Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I override a createSocket() method in my test cases to pas in a mocked Socket. After doing this the objects aren't serializable anymore.

Here's a example of what doesn't work.

Foo.java

import java.io.Serializable;

public class Foo implements Serializable {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = 3109852436898487119L;

    public void bar() {
        System.out.println("Foo");
    }
}

FooTest.java

import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;

import junit.framework.TestCase;

import org.junit.Test;

public class FooTest extends TestCase {

    // this passes
    @Test
    public void testFooIsSerializable() throws IOException {
        Foo foo = new Foo();

        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
        out.writeObject(foo);
    }

    // this throws a java.io.NotSerializableException
    @Test
    public void testFooIsStillSerializableAfterBarIsOverridden()
            throws IOException {

        // Eclipse gives me the warning "The serializable class  does not declare a static final serialVersionUID field of type long"
        // Adding it doesn't help
        Foo foo = new Foo() {
            @Override
            public void bar() {
                System.out.println("Bar");
            }
        };

        ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
        ObjectOutputStream out = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
        out.writeObject(foo);
    }
}

The stack trace when running FooTest with JUnit:

java.io.NotSerializableException: FooTest
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(ObjectOutputStream.java:1164)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.defaultWriteFields(ObjectOutputStream.java:1518)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeSerialData(ObjectOutputStream.java:1483)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeOrdinaryObject(ObjectOutputStream.java:1400)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject0(ObjectOutputStream.java:1158)
    at java.io.ObjectOutputStream.writeObject(ObjectOutputStream.java:330)
    at FooTest.testFooIsStillSerializableAfterBarIsOverridden(FooTest.java:33)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke0(Native Method)
    at sun.reflect.NativeMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(NativeMethodAccessorImpl.java:39)
    at sun.reflect.DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.invoke(DelegatingMethodAccessorImpl.java:25)
    at java.lang.reflect.Method.invoke(Method.java:597)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runTest(TestCase.java:168)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.runBare(TestCase.java:134)
    at junit.framework.TestResult$1.protect(TestResult.java:110)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.runProtected(TestResult.java:128)
    at junit.framework.TestResult.run(TestResult.java:113)
    at junit.framework.TestCase.run(TestCase.java:124)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.runTest(TestSuite.java:232)
    at junit.framework.TestSuite.run(TestSuite.java:227)
    at org.junit.internal.runners.JUnit38ClassRunner.run(JUnit38ClassRunner.java:83)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit4.runner.JUnit4TestReference.run(JUnit4TestReference.java:49)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.TestExecution.run(TestExecution.java:38)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:467)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.runTests(RemoteTestRunner.java:683)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.run(RemoteTestRunner.java:390)
    at org.eclipse.jdt.internal.junit.runner.RemoteTestRunner.main(RemoteTestRunner.java:197)

What is the problem with this? I have to admit, that I didn't dive too deep into Java's Serializable interface and more or less just followed Eclipse's quick fixes.

To be more specific to my implementation:

I have a class that should send an instance of itself via a ObjectOutputStream.

Is this a fundamentally wrong approach?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The problem is you have an anonymous inner class, which by definition contains a (compiler-generated) reference to the instance of the outer class (FooTest) which created it. Since serialization by default includes all members of the object, the runtime tries to serialize the FooTest object too - and that is not serializable (as it was not meant to be). This is attested by the error message:

java.io.NotSerializableException: FooTest

Thus if you turn your anonymous class into an explicit static inner class, the problem should go away.

share|improve this answer

Just declare a serialVersionUID if you want to serialize/deserialize:

   Foo foo = new Foo() {
     static final serialVersionUID = 348723598723589723L;
        @Override
        public void bar() {
            System.out.println("Bar");
        }
   };
share|improve this answer
    
as mentioned in a comment in my question's sourcecode this doesn't help – Zoran Zaric Jul 12 '11 at 10:18

After doing this the objects aren't serializable anymore.

You don't have any evidence of that. All you have is an Eclipse warning. What happens when you execute?

share|improve this answer
1  
A java.io.NotSerializableException is thrown. – Zoran Zaric Jul 12 '11 at 10:25
    
@Zoran Zaric: Naming which class? – EJP Jul 12 '11 at 10:28
    
I added the stacktrace – Zoran Zaric Jul 12 '11 at 10:33
1  
@Zoran Zaric So as it says there, what is not serializable is FooTest, not Foo. The reason for that is that constructing an anonymous inner class creates a secret reference to the containing class, in this case FooTest, which isn't serializable. In other words the test is invalid. To make a valid test you would have to define a static class that extends Foo and overrides the method. – EJP Jul 12 '11 at 10:41

You are creating a new annyonymous inner class that extends Foo by overriding its bar method. This newly created class does not implement the Serializable interface, and thus cannot be serialized.

EDIT:
Your subclass is withing FooTest, so this class with its inner classes are serialized. This is why FooTest would have to be serializable!

share|improve this answer
    
I guess a anonymous inner class can't implement interfaces, so I have to create a inner class that extends my original class? – Zoran Zaric Jul 12 '11 at 10:28
    
I was completely wrong, I just thought that could be a problem. But as the inner class will also "inherit" its super class's interfaces, it is of course serializable. I created an example similar to yours, and it just works as expected – king_nak Jul 12 '11 at 10:32

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.