Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just wondering what everyone uses to name variables that relate to an already descriptive class?

For example:

Dim customersData as New CustomersData
Dim customersCollection as CustomersCollection
customersCollection = customersData.GetAll()

There doesnt seem to be any set rule above is ok in C# but not advised in VB (although it will compile just fine) I have seen prefixes like 'o' (oCustomersData) aswell as 'my' (myCustomersData) but I'm not sure I like either have also seen abbreviations like cd & cc the argument being that all you have to do is hover over the variable to see the type but this seriously damages self documentation and readability.

Whats your thoughts folks?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would code it thus:

Dim customersData As New CustomersData
Dim customers As CustomersCollection
customers = customersData.GetAll()

I'm suggesting the variable name customers because I'm assuming that is the variable you will be using throughout the method and therefore it is more descriptive of what you are working on. For example later in the code you might have:

For each customer In customers
    ....
Next

Not advised in VB (although it will compile just fine)

I've not seen that advise before and I use this method all the time.

I have seen prefixes like 'o' (oCustomersData) as well as 'my' (myCustomersData) but I'm not sure I like either.

I never prefix variables like this. The only variables I prefix are class variables with _; eg _customers

I have also seen abbreviations like cd & cc the argument being that all you have to do is hover over the variable to see the type but this seriously damages self documentation and readability.

You have provided the answer. There is no need and it's damaging to readability to use short variable names like this. If the argument to use short variable names is typing speed I'd argue learn to type properly and use intellisense.

share|improve this answer
    
This was really a follow up from: stackoverflow.com/questions/1347569/… where many people argue for and against using this, some provide some good reasons some merely cite it as bad practice some have had errors as a result but no one really provides a definitive approach to a solution so was just wondering what others did. –  baileyswalk Jul 12 '11 at 14:25

I would probably go with:

Dim custData as New CustomersData 'Better name might be CustomersDataService
Dim customers as CustomersCollection
customers = custData.GetAll()

Name the variables by their meaning in the current context: Another example might be.

Dim excludedCustomers as CustomersCollection
excludedCustomers = custData.GetExcluded()
share|improve this answer
    
This works ok for this example but say your type name could not be easily abreviated is there not one rule that could be used top promote tidy code and consistency? –  baileyswalk Jul 12 '11 at 12:37
    
I don't usually include the type in the variable name. For example calling a property like UserName of type string StringUsername –  Magnus Jul 12 '11 at 12:42
    
yea calling a vaiable StringUsername is not something I would consider and I use contextual names where possible... but, when the situation arises when nothing else fits I'm still unsure if using the type name in lower camel case is the best practice. In my real world situation I could use your suggestion of type = CustomersDataService and use customersData for my variable name as it is only really the ClassNameData types that are affected by this. –  baileyswalk Jul 12 '11 at 14:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.