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Is there any way to get base word instead of root word in stemming using NLP in R?

Code:

> #Loading libraries
> library(tm)
> library(slam)
> 
> #Vector
> Vec=c("happyness happies happys","sky skies")
> 
> #Creating Corpus
> Txt=Corpus(VectorSource(Vec))
> 
> #Stemming
> Txt=tm_map(Txt, stemDocument)
> 
> #Checking result
> inspect(Txt)
A corpus with 2 text documents

The metadata consists of 2 tag-value pairs and a data frame
Available tags are:
  create_date creator 
Available variables in the data frame are:
  MetaID 

[[1]]
happi happi happi

[[2]]
sky sky

> 

Can I get base word "happy" (base word) instead of "happi" (root word) for "happyness happies happys" using R.

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not sure about R specifically, but in general you need a morpological analyzer, for example you can get this OS one: seman.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/seman/trunk/Docs/… –  D_K Aug 1 '11 at 20:37
    
Most probably you are not interested in stems, you want instead a lemmatizer. hmmm i could share with you my own open lemmatizer for english if you require that. but it's written in python... –  alvas Feb 3 '13 at 8:37

4 Answers 4

You're probably looking for a stemmer. Here are some stemmers from CRAN Task View: Natural Language Processing:

  • RWeka is a interface to Weka which is a collection of machine learning algorithms for data mining tasks written in Java. Especially useful in the context of natural language processing is its functionality for tokenization and stemming.

  • Snowball provides the Snowball stemmers which contain the Porter stemmer and several other stemmers for different languages. See the Snowball webpage for details.

  • Rstem is an alternative interface to a C version of Porter's word stemming algorithm.

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stemCompletion could be used here. It's not the best one but manageable.

Stemm = tm_map(Txt, stemCompletion, dictionary=Txtt)
inspect(Stemm)

A corpus with 2 text documents

The metadata consists of 2 tag-value pairs and a data frame
Available tags are:
  create_date creator 
Available variables in the data frame are:
  MetaID 

[[1]]
happyness happies happies

[[2]]
sky sky
share|improve this answer
    
stemCompletion is time consuming task, is there any alternative to get same words? Please someone help for this. –  jay_phate Dec 30 '14 at 13:17

Without a good knowledge of English morphology, you would have to use an existing library rather than create your own stemmer.

English is full of unexpected morphological surprises that would affect both probabilistic and rule-based models. Some examples are:

  • Removing an in- prefix to remove an -able suffix, as in inhabitable.
  • Change of the word's category, as in the noun bicycle resulting from stemming the verb bicycling (can affect rules based on categories).
  • Words with negative meanings cannot take negative prefixes (you can have unpretty, but not unugly).
  • Two words as a compound, as in "truck driver" (you would treat them as one word when you stem).

English also has an issue with I-umlaut, where words like men, geese, feet, best, and a host of other words (all with an 'e'-like sound) cannot be easily stemmed. Stemming foreign, borrowed words, like automaton, may also be an issue.

Stemming the superlative form is a good example of exceptions:

best -> good

eldest -> old

A lemmatizer would account for such exceptions, but would be slower. You can look at the Porter stemmer rules to get an idea of what you need, or you can just use its SnowballC R package.

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When I needed to do something similar, I wrote out my list of words in a text file, and fed it to the English Lexicon Project's web query tool, then parsed the result back into R. A little clunky, but lots of good data is available from ELP. For your use, Check out ELP's MorphSP. For happiness, it gives {happy}>ness>

http://elexicon.wustl.edu/query14/query14.asp

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