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I'm struggling a bit to understand the power behind OO programming. Granted I am only slightly experienced in coding in general, I was hoping this would come a lot easier than it has. For this example I created some basic code in order to determine if this is a correct/good way of containing objects within objects. If not, would you please guide me in the correct direction.

I have 2 classes: a Boy and a Dog Class. The Boy Class contains a Dog object. The Dog object knows who its owner is.

Here is a Boy class:

Public Class Boy

Protected mName As String
Public Property Name() As String
    Get
        Return mName
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        mName = value
    End Set
End Property

Protected mAge As Integer
Public Property Age() As Integer
    Get
        Return mAge
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As Integer)
        mAge = value
    End Set
End Property

Protected mReturnHome As New TimeSpan(3, 15, 0)
Public Property ReturnHome() As TimeSpan
    Get
        Return mReturnHome
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As TimeSpan)
        mReturnHome = value
    End Set
End Property

Protected mPet As New Dog(Me)
Public Property Pet() As Dog
    Get
        Return mPet
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As Dog)
        mPet = value
    End Set
End Property
End Class

And here is a Dog class:

Public Class Dog

Private _owner As Boy
Public Sub New(ByRef Owner As Boy)
    _owner = Owner
End Sub

Protected mName As String
Public Property Name() As String
    Get
        Return mName
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        mName = value
    End Set
End Property

Protected mBreed As String
Public Property Breed() As String
    Get
        Return mBreed
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        mBreed = value
    End Set
End Property

Protected mCanPlay As Boolean
Public Sub PlayBall()
    If Now.TimeOfDay >= _owner.ReturnHome Then
        mCanPlay = True
    Else
        mCanPlay = False
    End If
End Sub
End Class

I need to be able to gain access to the Boy Class from the Dog Class because the Dog needs to be able to recognize properties specific to its owner (Boy).

Thank you.

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1  
IMO - I find (and found when learning) the OO examples a lot easier to understand when they are modelled around real life programming examples rather then the Dog>Owner stuff which you would never code. –  Matt Wilko Jul 13 '11 at 10:09
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First off, make your variables Private, not Protected. There is no need whatsoever for derived classes to access them directly.

Secondly, although this is done a lot in .NET, consider not having so many setters. Most properties shouldn’t change in an object’s lifetime. The exception are DTOs – objects which represent database entities.

Also take care only to model those aspects of an object that you actually use. In real software, most attributes of a given entity are irrelevant (e.g. hair colour of the customers in a library management software) and only a few are really needed by the software. Only model those.

Thirdly, if your Dog class needs to access specific functionality from the Boy class, the easiest recourse is to make this specific functionality Public.

Finally, don’t pass the dog’s owner via ByRef to the constructor. This works, but makes absolutely no sense. Use ByVal everywhere except where it really is required (and I argue that it’s never required, there are better solutions).

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But if I simply just make the properties of the Boy Class Public, how would a Dog know its specific owner? –  Adam Beck Jul 12 '11 at 13:37
    
@Adam Uhm, it does through the owner reference that it has. That’s unrelated to access modifiers such as Public. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 12 '11 at 13:46
    
Well then I have correctly done that right? The Dog needs to access the ReturnHome property of the Boy which is set to Public. My bigger concern with this problem is how the Dog knows its Boy (the Parent Object, the Owner Object, whatever). –  Adam Beck Jul 12 '11 at 13:51
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You're on the right track, although there are a few things that Boy and Dog have in common, such as Name and Age, so now you would look at those common attributes and methods and create a base class Animal from which both Boy and Dog would derive.

WRT how you tie the two together - consider that a boy could have multiple dogs, but a dog can have only one owner, so probably Boy.Dog should be Boy.Dogs (a collection) but Dog.Owner (as Boy) is absolutely fine.

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I didn't want to make my example to complex, but I did know that I could inherit from a class such as Animal and I could also create a collection - I'm learning and I'm glad to hear you say those things! I was more concerned with the way I define a new Dog and how the Boy contains the Dog. –  Adam Beck Jul 12 '11 at 13:35
    
I would question, also, initializing the Dog object in the Boy object automatically like that. Anytime you instantiate a Boy, it automatically gets a Dog! There are probably Boys who don't have a dog. –  Chris Dunaway Jul 12 '11 at 15:06
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