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OS : linux 64 bit ARCH.

BOOST : 1.46.1

COMPILER : clang++ / GCC.

I have a code fragment that has the wire up of a tcp acceptor modelled on a boost::asio example (Chat Server). However, when I run the fragment, No listening TCP socket shows up in a netstat listening(linux) . However, the chat server example, when compiled, does show up. Could someone please point out what I am doing wrong ?

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>


using namespace boost::asio;
  using namespace boost::asio::ip;

  class ClientConnection
  {
  public:
    ClientConnection(io_service & io_s)
      : m_socket(io_s) {}
    tcp::socket & socket() { return m_socket; }
  private:
    tcp::socket m_socket;  
  };

  typedef boost::shared_ptr<ClientConnection> client_connection_ptr;

  class ClientConnectionAcceptor
  {
  public:
    ClientConnectionAcceptor(unsigned short port)
      : m_io_service(),
        m_port(port),
        m_endpoint(tcp::v4(), m_port),
        m_acceptor(m_io_service, m_endpoint)
    {
      std::cout << "acceptor is open : " << m_acceptor.is_open() << std::endl;
      client_connection_ptr ccp(new ClientConnection(m_io_service));

      m_acceptor.async_accept(  
        ccp->socket(),
        boost::bind(&ClientConnectionAcceptor::handle_accept,this, 
        ccp, placeholders::error));
    } 

    void handle_accept(client_connection_ptr ccp, const boost::system::error_code & error)
    {
      std::cout << "in handle_accept" << std::endl;  
      if(!error)
      {
       // m_rpc_oracle.AddNewClient(ccp);
        client_connection_ptr new_ccp(new ClientConnection(m_io_service));
        m_acceptor.async_accept(  
          new_ccp->socket(),
          boost::bind(&ClientConnectionAcceptor::handle_accept,this, 
          ccp, placeholders::error));

      }
    }

    io_service & io_service() { return m_io_service; }
  private:
    boost::asio::io_service m_io_service;
    tcp::endpoint m_endpoint;
    tcp::acceptor m_acceptor;
    unsigned short m_port;
  };


int main()
{
  ClientConnectionAcceptor acceptor(5000);
  acceptor.io_service().run();
}    
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I found that I could get this to work on my Windows machine if I changed the endpoint and acceptor to shared pointers, and instead of creating them by passing them as arguments in the constructor, I specifically created the shared pointers inside the constructor. I'm not exactly sure why this works. My only guess is that perhaps there are no guarantees that the constructor arguments are passed or created in the order they appear, and thus you may try to create the acceptor with an endpoint that isn't correctly initialized yet? That's really my only guess. Let me know if this works for you. I could successfully connect via localhost on port 5000.

Without these changes, the client that I tried to connect with via localhost told me the connection was actively refused. This arrangement was successful, however, and seems to deviate as little as possible from your original code. Hope it helps.

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>

using namespace boost::asio;
using namespace boost::asio::ip;

class ClientConnection
{
public:
  ClientConnection(io_service & io_s)
    : m_socket(io_s) {}
  tcp::socket & socket() { return m_socket; }
private:
  tcp::socket m_socket;  
};

typedef boost::shared_ptr<ClientConnection> client_connection_ptr;

class ClientConnectionAcceptor
{
public:
  ClientConnectionAcceptor(unsigned short port)
    : m_io_service(),
    m_port(port)
  {
    // now initializing endpoint and acceptor as shared pointers inside the constructor
    m_endpoint = boost::shared_ptr<tcp::endpoint>(new tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), m_port));
    m_acceptor = boost::shared_ptr<tcp::acceptor>(new tcp::acceptor(m_io_service, *m_endpoint));

    std::cout << "acceptor is open : " << m_acceptor->is_open() << std::endl;
    client_connection_ptr ccp(new ClientConnection(m_io_service));

    m_acceptor->async_accept(  
      ccp->socket(),
      boost::bind(&ClientConnectionAcceptor::handle_accept,this, 
      ccp, placeholders::error));
  } 

  void handle_accept(client_connection_ptr ccp, const boost::system::error_code & error)
  {
    std::cout << "in handle_accept" << std::endl;  
    if(!error)
    {
      // m_rpc_oracle.AddNewClient(ccp);
      client_connection_ptr new_ccp(new ClientConnection(m_io_service));
      m_acceptor->async_accept(  
        new_ccp->socket(),
        boost::bind(&ClientConnectionAcceptor::handle_accept,this, 
        ccp, placeholders::error));

    }
  }

  io_service & io_service() { return m_io_service; }
private:
  boost::asio::io_service m_io_service;
  boost::shared_ptr<tcp::endpoint> m_endpoint;
  boost::shared_ptr<tcp::acceptor> m_acceptor;
  unsigned short m_port;
};


int main()
{
  ClientConnectionAcceptor acceptor(5000);
  acceptor.io_service().run();
}    

EDIT

After some further investigation, it was discovered that the problem was actually related to the initializer list for the ClientConnectionAcceptor class. In the class definition, the member m_port was declared after m_endpoint and m_acceptor. As a result, even though the initializer list appeared to set up the port number before the endpoint and acceptor were created, in fact, the port value was not valid or initialized until after the endpoint and acceptor were already created. Changing the class definition to have the member m_port declared before endpoint and acceptor fixes the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, that did solve the problem, thank you. It probably has something to do with the initialization order in the initialization list. I thought it was top down . –  Hassan Syed Jul 12 '11 at 14:45
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/4037219/…. User "in silico"'s response, My assumptions where that initializer list order determined order-of-evaluation. But it's the order of declaration that determines the order. I still have to try it out though. –  Hassan Syed Jul 12 '11 at 14:51
    
Does that answer your question then, or was there something else? –  aardvarkk Jul 12 '11 at 14:51
    
Yes it does, It is still odd that it works for others though :D –  Hassan Syed Jul 12 '11 at 14:52
    
Yeah -- I just read over that answer, and your code example does have the declarations in the correct order also, so I'm not sure what the problem could be exactly... –  aardvarkk Jul 12 '11 at 14:53

I got an error when compiling your code

async_accept.cc:56: error: declaration of ‘boost::asio::io_service& ClientConnectionAcceptor::io_service()’
/opt/local/include/boost/asio/io_service.hpp:186: error: changes meaning of ‘io_service’ from ‘class boost::asio::io_service’

changing

io_service & io_service() { return m_io_service; }

to

io_service & get_io_service() { return m_io_service; }

seems to resolve the compiler failure. Running the resulting binary shows a listen socket in netstat -l -t for me.

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