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Why does this fragment of shell script give an error in a Makefile?

-@for file in `cat export_mojave_tcl_files.list`; do \
if { [ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file]} ; \
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if {! [ -s $$file.diff ]}; \
then rm -f $$file.diff ; \
else echo $$file >> marker.fill.tcl.diff; \
fi \
elif {[ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file] && ! [ -f $$file]} ; \
then echo $$file >> gold_exists; \
else echo $$file >> test_exists; \
fi; \
done ;

Error

/bin/sh: -c: line 1: syntax error near unexpected token `then'
/bin/sh: -c: line 1: `for file in `cat export_mojave_tcl_files.list`; do  if { [ -f ../GOLD/$file ] && [-f $file] } ;  then diff $file bk_marker > $file.diff ;  if ! [ -s $file.diff ]};  then rm -f $file.diff ;  else echo $file >> marker.fill.tcl.diff;  fi  elif { [ -f ../GOLD/$file] && ! [ -f $file] } ;  then echo $file >> gold_exists;  else echo $file >> test_exists;  fi;  done ;'
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2  
what error.....? –  sdolgy Jul 12 '11 at 14:02
    
If you remove the line wrapping slashes from your script and run it again, it'll give you an actual line number where the error is occurring. What's the benefit in wrapping everything into a one-line script? –  razlebe Jul 12 '11 at 14:14
1  
In Makefile, we have to wrap the lines to run the shell script. –  crazy_prog Jul 12 '11 at 14:17
3  
Sure - but wrap it as one line after it works. –  razlebe Jul 12 '11 at 14:26
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to be careful with spaces around the braces, and semi-colons before close braces..

if { [ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file]} ; \
                                              ^ here!
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if {! [ -s $$file.diff ]}; \
    ^ here!             ^ here!

In an orthodox shell derived from the Bourne shell (where bash shares the same views on the subject), you need to write:

if { [ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file] ; } ; \
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if { ! [ -s $$file.diff ] ; }; \

The semi-colons before the close brace are necessary for the shell to recognize the close brace as the end of an I/O redirection unit. Of course, since there is no I/O redirection, it is all somewhat hypothetical. I believe you'd get the same effect from:

if [ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file] ; \
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if ! [ -s $$file.diff ]; \

with no braces at all. I've seen worse abuses, such as:

if ( [ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file]) ; \
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if (! [ -s $$file.diff ]); \

This runs the tests in sub-shells, for no good reason. And, even worse, I've seen:

if ( `[ -f $(TEST_PATH)/$$file ] && [-f $$file]`) ; \
then diff $$file bk_marker > $$file.diff ; \
if (! `[ -s $$file.diff ]`); \

Fortunately, the test command does produce any output so the back-ticks don't have anything to execute, but it is an appalling waste of processes.

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Thank You all for such a silly question. ;-) –  crazy_prog Jul 13 '11 at 6:53
1  
@Amitesh: The preferred way of saying "Thank you" on StackOverflow (and the other Stack Exchange sites) is to up-vote and/or accept an answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 13 '11 at 6:59
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