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The following code fails to get me the first token of the string:

char *p1;
char array[100];
strcpy(array, "ANY STRING WOULD DO");
p1 = strtok(array, " ");
p1 = strtok(NULL, " ");
p1 = strtok(array, " ");
p1 = strtok(NULL, " ");

printf("%c", p1);
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Next time please use code formatting. I've done it this time for you. –  RedX Jul 12 '11 at 14:17
    
the program runs but terminates automatically, but if i remove the second p1 = strtok(NULL, " "); it runs perfectly –  shinshin32 Jul 12 '11 at 14:18
    
oops. sorry. i forgot to use it. –  shinshin32 Jul 12 '11 at 14:21
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5 Answers

strtok() actually replaces the delimiters with a literal '\0' - in effect writing over your original string. The second time you call strtok(array, "");, array now looks like

ANY'\0'STRING'\0'WOULD DO

(e.g. if you were to print the string, you'd just see "ANY")

Since strtok doesn't go beyond the end of a string, you'll only get the one token the second time around, and the call to strtok(NULL, " "); returns NULL. To overcome your problem, you need to either copy the string into another location for the second set of operations, or save a temporary string pointer.

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Please take a look at the example given here: MSDN: strtok, wcstok, _mbstok

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This would work:

char *p1;
char array[100];
strcpy(array, "ANY STRING WOULD DO");
p1 = strtok(array, " ");
p1 = strtok(NULL, " ");
strcpy(array, "ANY STRING WOULD DO");
p1 = strtok(array, " ");

printf("%s", p1);

strtok modifies the string it is passed so if you want to re-parse it you need to copy it again.

If you just want to keep the tokens, just copy the pointers.

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It wouldn't. Because you're passing a string literal to strtok, and it will want to modify that. –  Sander De Dycker Jul 12 '11 at 14:23
1  
nope... I'm passing a copy, just like the original code, the literal is the delimiter string and strtok won't change that. –  Spudd86 Jul 12 '11 at 14:28
    
heh ... my eyes deceived me heh ... For some reason I thought the "ANY STRING WOULD DO" string literal was passed to strtok directly - ignore me ;) –  Sander De Dycker Jul 12 '11 at 14:35
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Remember that strtok modifies the string by placing '\0' characters after every token.

So, when you try tokenizing the same string again, you're really tokenizing the first token only.

This will have as a result that the second p1 = strtok(NULL, " "); will return NULL, and when you then try to print p1, it'll try to dereference NULL, and probably fail.

Note btw, that you need to use "%s" instead of "%c", because you're printing a string, not a character.

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strtok() actually modifies the string you are looking for tokens in by adding zero-terminator characters ('\0') to it when it finds the end of a token. So after iterating through it, it is no longer a continuous string in memory anymore. This is why you can not start again at the beginning and re-parse the string for tokens.

You probably have two choices:

  • make a copy of the string first and tokenise that instead

    char *p1; char array[100]; strcpy(array, "ANY STRING WOULD DO");
    
    char tmp[100];
    strcpy( tmp, array );
    p1 = strtok(tmp, " ");
    p1 = strtok(NULL, " ");
    
    strcpy( tmp, array );
    p1 = strtok(tmp, " ");
    p1 = strtok(NULL, " ");
    
    printf("%c", p1);
    
  • or you could keep an array of pointers to the separate tokens as you find them and re-use the array, rather than re-calling strtok().

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