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Given this XML data:

<root>
  <item>apple</item>
  <item>orange</item>
  <item>banana</item>
</root>

I can use this XSLT markup:

...
<xsl:for-each select="root/item">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>,
</xsl:for-each>
...

to get this result:

apple, orange, banana,

but how do I produce a list where the last comma is not present? I assume it can be done doing something along the lines of:

...
<xsl:for-each select="root/item">
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>
  <xsl:if test="...">,</xsl:if>
</xsl:for-each>
...

but what should the test expression be?

I need some way to figure out how long the list is and where I currently am in the list, or, alternatively, if I am currently processing the last element in the list (which means I don't care how long it is or what the current position is).

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7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Take a look at the position(), count() and last() functions; e.g., test="position() &lt; last()".

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1  
That's exactly what I was looking for, thanks! Where's stuff like this documented anyway? The XPath spec? –  Anders Sandvig Mar 20 '09 at 18:17
    
Have a look at w3schools.com/xpath, they have a couple of great overviews of basic xpath syntax and capabilities. –  Rahul Mar 22 '09 at 17:46
    
I have this line: <xsl:value-of select="@Courses"/> which displays all the CSV but it doesn't look too user friendly. Is there any way to instead of comma, separate them by new line for each value? –  SiKni8 Mar 21 at 15:13
    
@SiKni8 Please create a new question for that. –  Willie Wheeler Mar 21 at 18:49

This is a pretty common pattern:

<xsl:for-each select="*">
   <xsl:value-of select="."/>
   <xsl:if test="position() != last()">
      <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>
   </xsl:if>
</xsl:for-each>
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I have updated my answer to reflect your comment to it :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 21 '09 at 20:45
1  
This fails if any of the values you're iterating over are empty. This will result in trailing- or double-commas. –  aaronbauman Jan 23 '13 at 22:39
    
@aaronbauman I wouldn't call that failing, but rather a missing if not empty :) –  Svish Feb 19 '13 at 10:21
<xsl:if test="following-sibling::*">,</xsl:if>

or (perhaps more efficient, but you'd have to test):

<xsl:for-each select="*[1]">
   <xsl:value-of select="."/>
   <xsl:for-each select="following-sibling::*">
       <xsl:value-of select="concat(',',.)"/>
   </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:for-each>
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Could you please elaborate on what that test is actually doing? –  Anders Sandvig Mar 20 '09 at 18:04
1  
the something:: indicates an axis - in this case, the following-sibling axis. There are various axes - the following-sibling axis is those nodes with the same parent that follow the current node in document order. This checks for the existence of any such nodes. If there aren't any, we're the last. –  Marc Gravell Mar 20 '09 at 20:16
    
That works, but "position()=last()" doesn't have to build a node-set and then test it. The XSLT processor might not be smart enough to know that it isn't going to need to compile a list of every following node, and if it does, that makes it a (roughly) O(n^2) operation. –  Robert Rossney Mar 21 '09 at 6:08
    
(Of course I meant "position() != last()". The devil is in the details.) –  Robert Rossney Mar 21 '09 at 6:10
    
I'll post an alternative, then ;-p –  Marc Gravell Mar 21 '09 at 9:49

For an XSLT 2.0 option, you can use the separator attribute on xsl:value-of.

This xsl:value-of:

<xsl:value-of select="/root/item" separator="', '"/>

would produce this output:

apple,orange,banana

You could also use more than just a comma for a separator. For example, this:

<xsl:text>'</xsl:text>
<xsl:value-of select="/root/item" separator="', '"/>
<xsl:text>'</xsl:text>

Would produce the following output:

'apple', 'orange', 'banana'

Another XSLT 2.0 option is string-join()...

<xsl:value-of select="string-join(/*/item,', ')"/>
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Robert gave the classis not(position() = last()) answer. This requires you to process the whole current node list to get context size, and in large input documents this might make the conversion consume more memory. Therefore, I normally invert the test to be the first thing

<xsl:for-each select="*">
  <xsl:if test="not(position() = 1)>, </xsl:if>
  <xsl:value-of select="."/>   
</xsl:for-each>
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I'm trying to think of why you wouldn't want to do that, and not coming up with a reason. –  Robert Rossney Mar 22 '09 at 21:08
    
position()!=last() won't work if you want exclude some of the items in the sequence. For instance what would happen if had a list like this: <list> <apple>delicious</apple> <banana>dole</banana> <orange>navel</orange> </list> with the template <template match="orange"/> to exclude oranges. –  BeWarned Mar 23 '09 at 6:00
    
@BeWarned, if you can't omit oranges in the select statement, then solutions with position() will not work. However, in this questions there are no template based exlucedes, so that doesn't really apply here. –  jelovirt Mar 23 '09 at 11:06

A simple XPath 1.0 one-liner:

     concat(., substring(',', 2 - (position() != last())))

Put it into this transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output method="text"/>

    <xsl:template match="/*">
      <xsl:for-each select="*">
        <xsl:value-of select=
         "concat(., substring(',', 2 - (position() != last())))"
         />
      </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

and apply it to the XML document:

<root>
    <item>apple</item>
    <item>orange</item>
    <item>banana</item>
</root>

to get the wanted result:

apple,orange,banana

EDIT:

Here is a comment from Robert Rossney to this answer:

That's pretty opaque code for a human to read. It requires you to know two non-obvious things about XSLT: 1) what the substring function does if its index is out of range and 2) that logical values can be implicitly converted to numerical ones.

and here is my answer:

Guys, never shy from learning something new. In fact this is all Stack Overflow is about, isn't it? :)

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1  
That's pretty opaque code for a human to read. It requires you to know two non-obvious things about XSLT: 1) what the substring function does if its index is out of range and 2) that logical values can be implicitly converted to numerical ones. –  Robert Rossney Mar 21 '09 at 6:14
    
@ Robert-Rossney Sure, part of its value is exactly in this! –  Dimitre Novatchev Mar 21 '09 at 14:52

This is the way I got it working for me. I tested this against your list:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="text" />

<xsl:template match="root">
    <xsl:call-template name="comma-join"><xsl:with-param name="list" select="item"/></xsl:call-template>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template name="comma-join">
    <xsl:param name="list" />
    <xsl:for-each select="$list">
        <xsl:value-of select="." />
        <xsl:if test="position() != last()">
            <xsl:text>, </xsl:text>
        </xsl:if>
    </xsl:for-each>
</xsl:template> 
</xsl:stylesheet>
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