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If we look at the source of the jQuery UI Dialog Modal confirmation demo:

$("#dialog-confirm").dialog({
    resizable: false,
    height: 140,
    modal: true,
    buttons: {
        "Delete all items": function () {
            $(this).dialog("close");
        },
        Cancel: function () {
            $(this).dialog("close");
        }
    }
});

we can see a difference between how the Delete all items and Cancel buttons are specified: only the Delete all items button has its caption in "quotes". Similar code can be found copy-pasted and strewn across the net.

Is there any significance to this? I've looked at the (uncompressed) source of jquery.ui.dialog.js and I don't think there's any funny business, but JS isn't exactly my strong point so I could easily be missing something.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is nothing funny about this, its simply a way of specifying a property with an unusual name. You could also do this:

$("#dialog-confirm").dialog({
resizable: false,
height: 140,
modal: true,
buttons: {
    "Delete all items": function () {
        $(this).dialog("close");
    },
    "Cancel": function () {
        $(this).dialog("close");
    }
}});

And it would amount to the same thing.

Basically what you are passing in to $("...").dialog is just a set of options as a javascript object. What jQuery will do underneath is use $.extend(...) to merge this with its defaults.

EDIT: deleted dodgy code

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Object literals in JavaScript must have the property names quoted if the names are not valid identifiers (or if they're reserved words like "class").

Other than that, there's no difference between those two properties in your example. They're just properties of an object.

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Cancel is a UI element that's virtually assured to be required by any dialog UI element. After all, while you can close out a window with the "X" in the upper corner, it's not the proper UI pattern to follow.

It works the same if you quote the cancel element.

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