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I am using "Edit Html" in firebug and inserting the following bit of code:

  <div title="show-details">
    X
    <p class="quick-details">
      <p title="about-player">
        <p title="name">Drew Brees #9</p>
        <p title="position">Quarterback</p>
        <p title="team">The Saints</p>
      </p>
    </p>
  </div>

However, when I move off of edit html mode, what is actually IN the DOM is this:

<div title="show-details">
    X
    <p class="quick-details">
      </p><p title="about-player">
    </p><p title="name">Drew Brees #9</p>
        <p title="position">Quarterback</p>
        <p title="team">The Saints</p>
      <p></p>
    <p></p>
  </div>

Am I missing something about how the p element works? The MDC says the content can be any flow element. Where are those </p>s coming from? Is it firefox? firebug?

Edit before I accept the answer: So apparently <p> cannot nest within <p>, does that mean that the MDC is wrong or that I am somehow misinterpreting it?

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Other elements that can be used in the <p> tags include: spans, b, anchors, small, strong and stuff like that. –  scrappedcola Jul 12 '11 at 14:53
    
I've updated my answer to reflect your edit. –  You Jul 12 '11 at 15:10
3  
The MDC page was wrong. I've fixed it. The spec at w3.org/TR/html5/grouping-content.html#the-p-element is pretty clear that only phrasing content is allowed as a child of <p> –  Boris Zbarsky Jul 12 '11 at 15:16
    
@Boris super upvote! –  George Mauer Jul 12 '11 at 15:26
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since the p element isn't allowed inside another p element, and its end tag is optional, Firebug (or rather, the underlying HTML/SGML parser) inserts an end tag where it (correctly) guesses there should be one.

Edit: The HTML 4.01 spec is very clear on this; you cannot nest p elements (and in that respect, the MDC is incorrect). The HTML5 spec, however, is very unclear on the subject (I have submitted feedback on the issue) The HTML5 spec is crystal clear on the subject, I'm just reading it wrong, and common sense as well as typographic effect dictates that a paragraph of text (which the p element represents) cannot contain a second paragraph of text.

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Really? According to developer.mozilla.org/en/HTML/Element/p#Usage_context p is one of the flow content elements and can accept any flow content element and be within any element that accepts flow content –  George Mauer Jul 12 '11 at 14:54
2  
@George: Well, according to the HTML 4.01 spec (and HTML5 as well), "The P element represents a paragraph. It cannot contain block-level elements (including P itself)." –  You Jul 12 '11 at 14:58
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It is incorrect to nest <p> elements.

Firefox parses the HTML to get a DOM tree. The DOM tree is always well-formed even if the source code isn't. This representation might also present whitespace and escape codes differently.

Firebug primarily works with the DOM representation. This

  • is simpler,
  • is less likely to suffer from discrepencies of interpretation,
  • and makes it possible to diagnose poorly-written HTML.

Firebug will refer back to the source only for things like script debugging.

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Probably happening because <p> are block-level elements and cannot contain other block-level elements.

Firebug is compensating and auto-correcting.

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from w3 documentation

The P element represents a paragraph. It cannot contain block-level elements (including P itself).

http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/text.html#h-9.3.1

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<div title="show-details">
  X
  <div class="quick-details">
    <div title="about-player">
      <p title="name">Drew Brees #9</p>
      <p title="position">Quarterback</p>
      <p title="team">The Saints</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</div>
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1  
-1. This does not address the question asked. –  You Jul 12 '11 at 15:00
    
It makes the corrections needed to prevent the issue presented so it actually does. –  Tyler Crompton Jul 12 '11 at 15:03
    
I disagree. The question is "Where are those </p>s coming from? Is it firefox? firebug?", not "How can I write correct code?". While these questions are related and can be dealt with at the same time, you should at least answer the explicit question. –  You Jul 12 '11 at 15:05
    
Yeah, I'm sorry Tyler, I know that <div> would work, I was confused by why <p> does not –  George Mauer Jul 12 '11 at 15:13
    
@You, I don't think my answer deserves a down-vote. No reason to hurt those that are trying to be constructive. A down-vote would be for an answer that is completely wrong or irrelevant. –  Tyler Crompton Jul 12 '11 at 15:18
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