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I have a @Transactional JUnit Test set up and I want to persist some test data to the database and also test if the associations are correct. However, when testing the associations, they always evaluate to null, even though it does work in a non-transactional test.

I persist two objects using the @Before annotation:

@Before
public void testData() {
    TestObjectOne o = new TestObjectOne();
    o.setName("One");
    repo.saveEntity(o); //autowired

    TestObjectTwo t = new TestObjectTwo();
    t.setOne(o);
    t.setName("Two");
    repo.saveEntity(t);
}

When accessing those two objects in a test, I get the correct instances:

    TestObjectOne o = repo.getOneByName("One");
    TestObjectOne t = repo.getTwoByName("Two");

When checking on the association between t and o, I get a correct reference because I explicitly defined that association:

    Assert.assertNotNull(t.getOne());

But when checking on the other way round, the object o is not correctly updated:

    Assert.assertNotNull(o.getTwos());

The association is defined in the domain object as

In One:

   @OneToMany(mappedBy = "one", fetch = FetchType.EAGER)
   private List<Two> twos;

In Two:

  @ManyToOne(optional = false)
  private One one;

When I have the test not run as @Transactional, it works nicely however.

edit saving the entities inside the test instead of the @Before method, doesn't make any difference.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

You need to flush and clear the current session after saving and before loading test objects for assertions.

When You save the TestObjectOne o the instance of it is kept in Hibernate session. Than You create TestObjectTwo t and add reference to o and save it so this instance is now also kept in Hibernate session. Than when You call get Hibernate gets You the instances You created earlier without updating them to reflect the actual state. So You need to flush and clear the session before loading - than the session L1 cache will be empty, and entities will be loaded corectly.

public class MyTest {

    @Before
    public void setUp() {

        TestObjectOne o = new TestObjectOne();
        o.setName("One");
        repo.saveEntity(o); //autowired

        TestObjectTwo t = new TestObjectTwo();
        t.setOne(o);
        t.setName("Two");
        repo.saveEntity(t);

        /* push all changes to current transaction*/
        repo.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().flush();
        /* clean current session, so when loading objects they'll
           be created from sratch and will contain above changes */
        repo.getSessionFactory().getCurrentSession().clear();
    }

    @Test
    public void test() {
        TestObjectOne o = repo.getOneByName("One");
        TestObjectOne t = repo.getTwoByName("Two");

        Assert.assertNotNull(t.getOne());
        Assert.assertNotNull(o.getTwos());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
clearing the session actually did the job. thanks. however, i feel it is kind of annoying to take care of the session during the test whilst it is managed correctly through spring in an production environment :(. is there any other way to test this? the test can give a false positive or a false negative because I forgot to flush/clear - which I don't have to do in production code :( –  chzbrgla Jul 15 '11 at 12:38
1  
If You want a single transaction with a rollback in the end - no, I don't think there's any other way. That's just how Hibernate works - the entity is populated with data from db only once, when it's loaded to the current session. When You flush the session Hibernate will perform update do Your data in DB, but it won't change entities in current session. It'll actually work the same way in production code if You'd call it in a single transactions. It'll work correctly only if You call load in another transaction after save. –  Roadrunner Jul 15 '11 at 13:22
1  
To make things a little easier I usually write a base class for transactional tests that @Autowires SessionFactory and has a single method flushAndClear() that just takes the current session and calls flush() and clear(), but You still need to remember to call it and reload objects before assertions. –  Roadrunner Jul 15 '11 at 13:27

The @Transactional annotation triggers a rollback after the test, so the results are not persisted into the database.

For tests that require data to be persisted, you can add the @Rollback(false) annotation in addition to the @Transactional one.

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The strange hing is that in your case some elements are persisted (objects) and other elements are not (relationships). Maybe it has to do with the underlying persistence technology used (JPA+Hibernate?). –  Pau Giner Jul 13 '11 at 15:33
    
I know that @Transactional triggers a rollback - that's exactly what I want :p. However, I want the associations between objects to be propagated even within the transaction. And that's what's not happening right now. I'm kinda stuck here :p –  chzbrgla Jul 14 '11 at 8:01

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