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What is the best way to use the values stored in an Enum as String literals? For example:

public enum Modes {
    some-really-long-string,
    mode2,
    mode3
}

Then later I could use Mode.mode1 to return its string representation as mode1. Without having to keep calling Mode.model.toString().

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13 Answers 13

up vote 259 down vote accepted

You can't. I think you have three options here. All three offer a solution but with a slightly different approach...

Option One: add overriding properties to your enums

public enum Modes {
    mode1 ("Mode1"),
    mode2 ("Mode2"),
    mode3 ("Mode3");

    private final String name;       

    private Modes(String s) {
        name = s;
    }

    public boolean equalsName(String otherName) {
        return (otherName == null) ? false : name.equals(otherName);
    }

    public String toString() {
       return this.name;
    }
}

Option Two: use static finals instead of enums:

public final class Modes {

    public static final String MODE_1 = "Mode 1";
    public static final String MODE_2 = "Mode 2";
    public static final String MODE_3 = "Mode 3";

    private Modes() { }
}

Option Three: interfaces have every field public, static and final:

public interface Modes {

    String MODE_1 = "Mode 1";
    String MODE_2 = "Mode 2";
    String MODE_3 = "Mode 3";  
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm but what is best / most efficient I wonder? – Daniel Wilson Mar 14 at 13:36

Every enum has both a name() and a valueOf(String) method. The former returns the string name of the enum, and the latter gives the enum value whose name is the string. Is this like what you're looking for?

String name = Modes.mode1.name();
Modes mode = Modes.valueOf(name);

There's also a static valueOf(Class, String) on Enum itself, so you could also use

Modes mode = Enum.valueOf(Modes.class, name);
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12  
THIS should be an ANSWER! Using something like A("A") can be source of errors and it is senseless extra work! – Firzen Apr 18 '14 at 9:42
2  
@Firzen not if the string value is allowed to contain spaces or hyphens, which is the case in some-really-long-string. – ceving Jun 13 '14 at 15:28
    
@ceving The question is not phrased well in respect to spaces and hyphens. The questions shows a hyphenated example, but doesn't ask how to create an Enum using hyphenated values. Instead the question asks how to get the String value without having to call toString without specifying hyphenated values are a requirement. That said, I think this could be a better answer if it were amended to mention that the Enum values must still follow Java naming rules and would need to use something mentioned in the accepted answer if such characters were required. – Hazok May 15 '15 at 15:17
    
I wanted to add a link to mkyong who uses the valueOf(String) method in combination with toUpperCase(Locale) to ensure String conversion. – Unknown Id Oct 9 '15 at 7:45

You could override the toString() method for each enum value.

Example:

public enum Country {

  DE {
    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "Germany";
    }
  },
  IT {
    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "Italy";
    }
  },
  US {
    @Override
    public String toString() {
      return "United States";
    }
  }

}

Usage:

public static void main(String[] args) {
  System.out.println(Country.DE); // Germany
  System.out.println(Country.IT); // Italy
  System.out.println(Country.US); // United States
}
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I like this. No reason not to use an enum as a class with further functionality such as get a list of all the values, get a string of each type, etc. – reala valoro Oct 1 '14 at 23:03
2  
Ugly and not reusable. Much better to provide a string value as constructor for Country and then override the toString() method for the enum. – greg7gkb Mar 26 '15 at 22:36
    
@Larry should revisit this and tell if the original question required something else. Though other answers are very informative, I guess this is the only answer to the original question. – Mahesha999 Apr 10 '15 at 10:50
1  
This is a good technique when you have quite a large enumeration and only want to override what things print as for one or two members. – Donal Fellows Sep 11 '15 at 11:38
    
This doesn't scale at all. Don't do this. – sebnukem Oct 23 '15 at 15:19

mode1.name() or String.valueOf(mode1). It doesn't get better than that, I'm afraid

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2  
and mode1.toString() ? – Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:13

You can use Mode.mode1.name() however you often don't need to do this.

Mode mode =
System.out.println("The mode is "+mode);
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5  
It's worth noting that the + operator will call toString() on the enum, and not name(). And toString() may be overridden to return something other than the name (even if it isn't desirable) – JB Nizet Jul 12 '11 at 16:05
    
Both name() and toString() can be overriden, but hopefully this will be clear from reading the code for the enum if this is happening. – Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:12
3  
No. name() is final, and always returns the name of the enum as declared in its enum declaration. – JB Nizet Jul 12 '11 at 16:13
1  
@JB Nizet, You are right. name() is final. Thank you for correcting me. :) – Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:20

As far as I know, the only way to get the name would be

Mode.mode1.name();

If you really need it this way, however, you could do:

public enum Modes {
    mode1 ("Mode1"),
    mode2 ("Mode2"),
    mode3 ("Mode3");

    private String name;       

    private Modes(String s) {
        name = s;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But in this case, Mode.mode1 is still not of type String. – Larry Jul 12 '11 at 16:15
    
Oh right. You'd need a getName() method, which kind of defeats the purpose, so no, you cannot do this. – Jake Roussel Jul 12 '11 at 16:18
    
"name" is bad field name, it is standart field of enum. – Wooff Jul 10 '15 at 7:28

As Benny Neugebauer mentions, you could overwrite the toString(). However instead overwriting the toString for each enum field I like more something like this:

public enum Country{
    SPAIN("España"),
    ITALY("Italia"),
    PORTUGAL("Portugal");


    private String value;

    Country(final String value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public String getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return this.getValue();
    }
}

You could also add a static method to retrieve all the fields, to print them all, etc. Simply call getValue to obtain the string associated to each Enum item

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my solution for your problem!

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public enum MapEnumSample {
    Mustang("One of the fastest cars in the world!"), 
    Mercedes("One of the most beautiful cars in the world!"), 
    Ferrari("Ferrari or Mercedes, which one is the best?");

    private final String description;
    private static Map<String, String> enumMap;

    private MapEnumSample(String description) {
        this.description = description;
    }

    public String getEnumValue() {
        return description;
    }

    public static String getEnumKey(String name) {
        if (enumMap == null) {
            initializeMap();
        }
        return enumMap.get(name);
    }

    private static Map<String, String> initializeMap() {
        enumMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
        for (MapEnumSample access : MapEnumSample.values()) {
            enumMap.put(access.getEnumValue(), access.toString());
        }
        return enumMap;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        // getting value from Description
        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("One of the fastest cars in the world!"));

        // getting value from Constant
        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.Mustang.getEnumValue());

        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("One of the most beautiful cars in the world!"));
        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.Mercedes.getEnumValue());

        // doesnt exist in Enum
        System.out.println("Mustang or Mercedes, which one is the best?");
        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("Mustang or Mercedes, which one is the best?") == null ? "I don't know!" : "I believe that "
                + MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("Ferrari or Mustang, which one is the best?") + " is the best!.");

        // exists in Enum
        System.out.println("Ferrari or Mercedes, wich one is the best?");
        System.out.println(MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("Ferrari or Mercedes, which one is the best?") == null ? "I don't know!" : "I believe that "
                + MapEnumSample.getEnumKey("Ferrari or Mercedes, which one is the best?") + " is the best!");

    }
}
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It looks like the OP's problem was solved 4 years ago, but welcome to StackOverflow :) – TDG Aug 14 '15 at 20:56
1  
Thanks, just to help somebody like me, looking for more objective answers to old problems :) – Renan Galdino da Silva Aug 14 '15 at 21:13

Enum is just a little bit special class. Enums can store additional fields, implement methods etc. For example

public enum Modes {
    mode1('a'),
    mode2('b'),
    mode3('c'),
    ;
    char c;

    private Modes(char c) {
        this.c = c;
    }
    public char character() {
        return c;
    }
}

Now you can say:

System.out.println(Modes.mode1.character())

and see output: a

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You can simply use:

""+ Modes.mode1
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I'm not 100% sure on this but as far as my knowledge goes this cast isn't necessary, is it? Concatenating an empty string with another variable should automatically call for a conversion, or are there any exceptions to this rule? – Unknown Id Oct 9 '15 at 7:39
1  
You are right, the correct version should be "" + Modes.mode1. I fixed the answer – E B Oct 9 '15 at 11:13
package com.common.test;

public  enum Days {


    monday(1,"Monday"),tuesday(2,"Tuesday"),wednesday(3,"Wednesday"),
    thrusday(4,"Thrusday"),friday(5,"Friday"),saturday(6,"Saturday"),sunday(7,"Sunday");

    private int id;
    private String desc;


    Days(int id,String desc){
        this.id=id;
        this.desc=desc;
    }

    public static String getDay(int id){

        for (Days day : Days.values()) {
            if (day.getId() == id) {
                return day.getDesc();
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getDesc() {
        return desc;
    }

    public void setDesc(String desc) {
        this.desc = desc;
    }



};
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1  
Can you pls explain on how it would resolve the issue ? – Phani Jan 28 at 13:46
    
you can call this enum anywhere by using this line : int id=1; String dayName = Days.getDay(id); , pass here id . it will return Description for that id that is "Tuesday" – Bhanwar Rathore Jan 29 at 12:32

after many tries I have come with this solution

public static enum Operation {

    Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division,;

    public String getUserFriendlyString() {
        if (this==Addition) {
            return " + ";
        } else if (this==Subtraction) {
            return " - ";
        } else if (this==Multiplication) {
            return " * ";
        } else if (this==Division) {
            return " / ";
        }
        return "undefined";
       }
}
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public enum Modes {
  MODE1("Mode1"),
  MODE2("Mode2),
  MODE3(Mode3);

 private String value;
 public String getValue() {
    return value;
   }
 public Modes(String value) {
  this.value = value;
 } 
}

you can call like below whereever you want to get value as string from enum.

Modes.MODE1.getvalue();

This will return "Mode1" as String.

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