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What is the best way to use the values stored in an Enum as String literals?

For example:

public enum Modes {
    some-really-long-string,
    mode2,
    mode3
}

Then later I could use Mode.mode1 to return its string representation as: “mode1”. Without having to keep calling Mode.model.toString().

EDIT: some more explanation... What I like to have is when users call certain functions, they need to specify a mode type (using this as an example). So instead of remembering the long-string that a particular mode is represented as, they can just call Mode.mode1, for example.

EDIT: I guess the answer finally is it can’t be done. Better off to use a class definition with static variables, in order to achieve the effect I want.

Thnx!

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You can’t. Give us more details about what exactly you need, maybe then we can tell you another solution. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 12 '11 at 15:59
    
It's a duplicate from stackoverflow.com/questions/604424/… , or very similar, isn't it ? –  woliveirajr Jul 12 '11 at 16:07
1  
some-really-long-string is supposed to be the natural name of the enum value. If it feels more natural to call it mode1, then definitely change its name to mode1. The name of the enum and the name used to display it to end users (not developers) should be different. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '11 at 16:12
3  
Why not just pass enum, not String, around. It is much more robust solution and guarantees not to mix apples and oranges. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 12 '11 at 16:24
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6 Answers

up vote 76 down vote accepted

You can't. I think you have three options here. All three offer a solution but with a slightly different approach...

Option One: add overriding properties to your enums

public enum Modes {
    mode1 ("Mode1"),
    mode2 ("Mode2"),
    mode3 ("Mode3");

    private final String name;       

    private Modes(String s) {
        name = s;
    }

    public boolean equalsName(String otherName){
        return (otherName == null)? false:name.equals(otherName);
    }

    public String toString(){
       return name;
    }

}

Option Two: use static finals instead of enums:

public final class Modes {
    public static final String MODE_1 = "Mode 1";
    public static final String MODE_2 = "Mode 2";
    public static final String MODE_3 = "Mode 3";

    private Modes(){
    }  
}

Option Three: interfaces have every field public, static and final:

public interface Modes {
    String MODE_1 = "Mode 1";
    String MODE_2 = "Mode 2";
    String MODE_3 = "Mode 3";  
}
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Yes, option2 would be the only way to achieve the effect I want. (rather than using enums) –  Larry Jul 12 '11 at 16:21
1  
+1 the return type of 'equalsName' should be boolean or Boolean –  Vladtn Jan 25 '13 at 12:15
3  
I think option three is the least verbose and looks cleaner than the other two. What do you think? –  Igor Ganapolsky Dec 13 '13 at 14:55
2  
@IgorGanapolsky option three lacks enumeration and can not be used for EnumMap. –  ceving Jun 13 at 15:25
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Every enum has both a name() and a valueOf(String) method. The former returns the string name of the enum, and the latter gives the enum value whose name is the string. Is this like what you're looking for?

String name = Modes.mode1.name();
Modes mode = Modes.valueOf(name);

There's also a static valueOf(Class, String) on Enum itself, so you could also use

Modes mode = Enum.valueOf(Modes.class, name);
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THIS should be an ANSWER! Using something like A("A") can be source of errors and it is senseless extra work! –  Firzen Apr 18 at 9:42
    
@Firzen not if the string value is allowed to contain spaces or hyphens, which is the case in some-really-long-string. –  ceving Jun 13 at 15:28
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mode1.name() or String.valueOf(mode1). It doesn't get better than that, I'm afraid

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and mode1.toString() ? –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:13
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You can use Mode.mode1.name() however you often don't need to do this.

Mode mode =
System.out.println("The mode is "+mode);
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4  
It's worth noting that the + operator will call toString() on the enum, and not name(). And toString() may be overridden to return something other than the name (even if it isn't desirable) –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '11 at 16:05
    
Both name() and toString() can be overriden, but hopefully this will be clear from reading the code for the enum if this is happening. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:12
3  
No. name() is final, and always returns the name of the enum as declared in its enum declaration. –  JB Nizet Jul 12 '11 at 16:13
1  
@JB Nizet, You are right. name() is final. Thank you for correcting me. :) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 12 '11 at 16:20
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As far as I know, the only way to get the name would be

Mode.mode1.name();

If you really need it this way, however, you could do:

public enum Modes {
    mode1 ("Mode1"),
    mode2 ("Mode2"),
    mode3 ("Mode3");

    private String name;       

    private Modes(String s) {
        name = s;
    }
}
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But in this case, Mode.mode1 is still not of type String. –  Larry Jul 12 '11 at 16:15
    
Oh right. You'd need a getName() method, which kind of defeats the purpose, so no, you cannot do this. –  Jake Roussel Jul 12 '11 at 16:18
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Enum is just a little bit special class. Enums can store additional fields, implement methods etc. For example

public enum Modes {
    mode1('a'),
    mode2('b'),
    mode3('c'),
    ;
    char c;

    private Modes(char c) {
        this.c = c;
    }
    public char character() {
        return c;
    }
}

Now you can say:

System.out.println(Modes.mode1.character())

and see output: a

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