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I'm attempting to write a simple Select method on a class that inherits from IList.

public class RowDataCollection : IList<RowData> {
  private List<RowData> rowList;

  internal RowDataCollection(List<RowData> data) {
    rowList = data;
  }
  // ...
}

public RowDataCollection Rows;

public RowDataCollection Select(string colName, object value) {
  List<RowData> rowList = from item in Rows
         where item[colName].Value == value
         select item;
  return new RowDataCollection(rowList);
}

Some problems I'm having:

First:

  • VS2010 reports Cannot implicitly convert type 'IEnumerable<RowData>' to 'List<RowData>'. An explicit conversion exists (are you missing a cast?)

OK, where does the CAST go?

Second:

  • Someone could pass in an invalid colName value (i.e. String.IsNullOrEmpty(colName)) or a null parameter (object value == null).

How would I handle the way my function returns if the input parameters are invalid?

[Solved]

I edited my Select statement (even renamed it per the suggestions here). I had to use a switch to cast to the data type that the data was in, but it does work.

public RowDataCollection SelectRow(string colName, object value) {
  if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(colName) && (value != null) && (0 < Rows.Count)) {
    switch (Rows[0][colName].GetValueType()) {
      case TableDataType.Boolean:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => (bool)r[colName].Value == (bool)value).ToList());
      case TableDataType.Character:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => (char)r[colName].Value == (char)value).ToList());
      case TableDataType.DateTime:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => (DateTime)r[colName].Value == (DateTime)value).ToList());
      case TableDataType.Decimal:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => (Decimal)r[colName].Value == (Decimal)value).ToList());
      case TableDataType.Integer:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => (int)r[colName].Value == (int)value).ToList());
      case TableDataType.String:
        return new RowDataCollection(Rows.Where(r => r[colName].Value.ToString() == value.ToString()).ToList());
    }
  }
  return null;
}

[Solved (short version)]

Jon Skeet posted this about the same time I posted my solution, and (as always) his code is much nicer.

public RowDataCollection SelectRow(string colName, object value) {
  List<RowData> rowList = Rows.Where(r => r[colName].Value.Equals(value)).ToList();
  return new RowDataCollection(rowList);
}

@Jon Skeet: If I ever see your face in the same line at some software developer position I'm applying for, I'm just going to turn around and go home.

@Everyone: Thanks for all the help!

share|improve this question
    
LOL... four exact same answers with @Jon Skeet posting an answer 16 seconds ahead of @sixlettervariables who posted 2 seconds ahead of @Justin Niessner who was 16 seconds ahead of @alexanderb... SO is amazing... –  Dean Kuga Jul 12 '11 at 17:02
    
Something makes me think I'm missing some vital piece of the puzzle to making this LINQ work. I just haven't seen an explanation yet that clicks with me. It's VOO-DOO I tell ya! –  jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 17:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The result of a query like that isn't a List<T>, it's an IEnumerable<T>. If you want to convert that into a List<T>, just call ToList:

List<RowData> rowList = (from item in Rows
                         where item[colName].Value == value
                         select item).ToList();

As it happens, you're only calling Where in your query. I would rewrite this as:

List<RowData> rowList = Rows.Where(item => item[colName].Value.Equals(value))
                            .ToList();

I'd also rename the method to something which is obviously filtering rather than projecting, given that the latter is the more common use of the term "select" in LINQ.

As for input parameters - I suggest you validate the arguments and throw an exception if they're not valid:

if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(colName))
{
    throw new ArgumentException("colName");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to debug LINQ? It seems to be returning all rows and the column I'm searching on has distinct values. –  jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 19:42
    
@jp2code: It's not really clear what you mean... but for LINQ to Objects, you could always put a break point in the lambda expression. –  Jon Skeet Jul 12 '11 at 19:43
    
I can look at my data and see that there is only one row with an ID of 102, for example. Including the values, Rows.Where(item => item["ID"].Value == 102).ToList(); is returning everything in my Rows collection. This is hard to explain on SO. –  jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 20:25
    
@jp2code: It really won't do that. I suspect you're misunderstanding your code, or you're looking at the wrong collection, or something like that. Honestly, Where does work :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 12 '11 at 20:30
1  
@jp2code: Uh, yes, that would be it... it'll be boxing the value, and then comparing by reference. I've edited the answer to use Equals instead, and that should be okay. –  Jon Skeet Jul 12 '11 at 21:27

You're getting the error message because LINQ Queries return IEnumerable, not List.

If you need a List, it's easy enough:

List<RowData> rowList = (from item in Rows
                         where item[colName].Value == value
                         select item).ToList();
share|improve this answer

You can't directly cast an IEnumerable<RowData> to a List<RowData>, however, there does exist a convenience function Enumerable.ToList<T>(), used like so:

List<RowData> rowList = (from item in Rows
                         where item[colName].Value == value
                         select item).ToList();

As for your second question, an exception would occur during the ToList() call as the LINQ expression is evaluated immediately. You have a few options, including throwing ArgumentExceptions or returning an empty list. It depends on your use cases. I'd suggest simply throwing an exception (assuming you have some HasColumn() method on your RowData class):

if (colName == null)
{
    throw new ArgumentNullException("colName");
}
else if (!Rows.All(row => row.HasColumn(colName)))
{
    throw new ArgumentException("No such column " + colName, "colName");
}

Per your edit, another approach, if a column missing is not necessarily a "problem":

...
// note the change to Any()
else if (!Rows.Any(row => row.HasColumn(colName))
{
    throw new ArgumentException("No such column " + colName, "colName");
}

List<RowData> rowList = (from item in Rows
                         where item.HasColumn(colName)
                            && item[colName].Value == value
                         select item).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
RowData contains HasColumn now! :) –  jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 17:36

You have to convert IQueriable<> to List<>, by calling ToList();

  public RowDataCollection Select(string colName, object value) {
      List<RowData> rowList = from item in Rows
             where item[colName].Value == value
             select item;
      return new RowDataCollection(rowList.ToList());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
VS2010 puts my red squiggly line under the where clause! –  jp2code Jul 12 '11 at 17:31
1  
-1 the Enumerable.ToList<T>() is being called too late. @jp2code: the result of a raw LINQ-to-Objects query is IEnumerable<T> where T is type of the last statement. In your case this is select item, and item is RowData. Hence, rowList is IEnumerable<RowData> not List<RowData>. –  user7116 Jul 12 '11 at 17:46

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