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I have an output that is basically a paragraph and when I try to search the string for a substring, if that substring is split up it doesnt' work. How can I make the paragraph string into just 1 line?

Example string:

I have an output that is basically a paragraph and when I try 
to search the string for a substring, if that substring is split up it 
doesn't work. How can I make the paragraph string into just 1 line?

substring: "it doesn't work"

When I try to search for that substring, it doesn't return true.

share|improve this question
up vote 10 down vote accepted

It seems like you want to treat newlines as spaces. Writing efficient search algorithms is not trivial, but an approach that works and answers the question in your title, is

str := StringReplace(str, sLineBreak, ' ', [rfReplaceAll]);

That is, we simply replace all linebreaks with spaces. Without the magic constants, this is

str := StringReplace(str, #13#10, #32, [rfReplaceAll]);

Perhaps there are already spaces between the words, in addition to the linebreaks? Then just remove the linebreaks, without adding spaces:

str := StringReplace(str, #13#10, '', [rfReplaceAll]);
share|improve this answer
    
I wonder why finding a substring wouldn't work. That can only happen if the newline was added inside the substrings to be found. In that case, your solution should work, if it was a newline. But if another type of line break character(s) was used to indicate a soft newline (e.g. for word wrap), it won't work. – Rudy Velthuis Jul 13 '11 at 15:22

You can try this function:

function NoLineFeed(const s: string): string;
var i: integer;
begin
  result := s;
  for i := 1 to length(result) do
    if ord(result[i])<32 then
      result[i] := ' ';
end;

It will change any control character (#10,#13,#9...) into a space, so the text will be on the same line. It will also be faster than calling StringReplace().

Edit:

function NoLineFeed(const s: string): string;
var i: integer;
begin
  result := s;
  for i := length(result) downto 1 do
    if ord(result[i])<32 then
      if (i>1) and (ord(result[i-1])<=32) then
        delete(result,i,1) else
        result[i] := ' ';
end;

So that it will change #13#10 into one single ' '.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. However, it does not handle the case #32#13#10. – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 12 '11 at 18:23
1  
Well, truth be told, it does not even handle the case #13#10, which will be converted to #32#32, and hence there will be no match. – Andreas Rejbrand Jul 12 '11 at 18:24
    
@Andreas Of course, but it's faster than deleting the duplicates. I've edited to avoid creating two spaces. – Arnaud Bouchez Jul 12 '11 at 18:30
    
When you delete(result,i,1) one character is skipped. – jordani Jul 13 '11 at 1:21
    
@jordani NO character is skipped, since I'm loop in reverse order: from length(result) downto 1. – Arnaud Bouchez Jul 13 '11 at 6:04

Try something like this:

S := 'paragraph here';
S := AdjustLineBreaks(S, tlbsLF);
S := StringReplace(S, #10, ' ', [rfReplaceAll]);
I := Pos('search string here', S);
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