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Is there better way to calculate circle from radius and num of vertices? My solution compute sin and cos for every vertex. Is it necessary?

void getCircle2D(Vector2 * perimeterPointsArray, int32 numOfPoints, Vector2 & center, flt32 radius)
{
    ASSERT(numOfPoints >= 3);
    flt32 pieceAngle = MathConst::TAU / numOfPoints;
    flt32 iterAngle = 0;
    for (int32 i = 0; i < numOfPoints; ++i)
    {
        perimeterPointsArray[i] = Vector2(radius * cos(iterAngle) + center.x, radius * sin(iterAngle) + center.y);
        iterAngle += pieceAngle;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your suggested approach should be the usual method to do it. But maybe you can come up with an iterative computation using the following addition theorems (see Wikipedia):

sin(a+b) = sin(a)*cos(b) + cos(a)*sin(b)
cos(a+b) = cos(a)*cos(b) - sin(a)*sin(b)

Where in your case a is the previous angle (whose cos and sin you just computed) and b is the constant angle step (whose cos and sin are also constant, of course). So something like this could work:

void getCircle2D(Vector2 * perimeterPointsArray, int32 numOfPoints, Vector2 & center, flt32 radius)
{
    flt32 pieceAngle = MathConst::TAU / numOfPoints;
    flt32 sinb = sin(pieceAngle), cosb = cos(pieceAngle);
    flt32 sina = 0.0, cosa = 1.0;
    for (int32 i = 0; i < numOfPoints; ++i)
    {
        perimeterPointsArray[i] = Vector2(radius * cosa + center.x, radius * sina + center.y);
        flt32 tmp = sina * cosb + cosa * sinb;
        cosa = cosa * cosb - sina * sinb;
        sina = tmp;
    }
}

Here you only have to compute one sin and one cos (that could even be precomputed if the number of points is known at compile time).

@yi_H I don't know if the circle rasterization algorithm is really suited for floating point circle approximation, but maybe in floating point it generalizes to the above mentioned iterative computation.

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You don't need sin and cos:

Midpoint circle algorithm. It's for pixel graphics but should be very easy to modify it to create verices. Of course this only makes sense if the number of vertices is comparable to the number of pixels (say an order of magnitude smaller).

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You could calculate half the points and then mirror around the X center.

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quarter and double-mirror –  Karoly Horvath Jul 12 '11 at 19:23
    
@yi_H how would you make it works with e.g. 5 vertices? –  relaxxx Jul 12 '11 at 19:36
    
you're right, if you have strict requirements like that (it should work with odd numbers) then I wouldn't... but that doesn't sound realistic to me. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 12 '11 at 19:40
    
@yi_H, quarter doesn't work if the number of points is odd. For an extreme example, consider 3 points. –  AShelly Jul 12 '11 at 19:47
    
yepp I said the same thing. But you tipically approximate a circle with let's say 100 vertices or more and I just don't think that it is a realistic scenario that you will need exactly 101 vertices. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 12 '11 at 19:51

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