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I've got a long running python project that uses the subprocess module to start various other programs. It waits for each program to finish, then ends the wrapper function and returns to its wait loop.

Eventually, this brings the computer it's running on to a grinding halt, with the error that there is no more file descriptors available.

I'm not able to find anywhere in the subprocess docs what happens to file descriptors when a child process closes. At first, I thought they would close automatically, since the subprocess.call() command waits until the child terminates.

But if that were the case I wouldn't have a problem. I also thought that if there was anything left over, python would garbage collect it when the function finishes, and the file descriptors go out of scope. But this doesn't seem to be the case either.

How would I get access to these file descriptors? the subprocess.call() function only returns the exit code, not open file descriptors. Is there something else I'm missing here?

This project acts as glue between various enterprise apps. Said apps cannot be pipelined, and they are gui systems. So, the only thing I can do is start them off with their built in macros. These macros output text files, which I use for the next program in the pipe.

Yes, it is as bad as it sounds. Luckily, All the files end up having pretty unique names. So, here in the next few days I'll be using the sys internals tool suggested below to try and track down the file. I'll let you know how it turns out.

Most of the files I don't open, I just move them with the win32file.CopyFile() function.

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maybe you're running a process which opens another process? then when your process ended you think you're cleaned but actually not really? did you check ps/top/task manager to see if you have running processes? –  RoeeK Jul 12 '11 at 19:49
    
Is this "python project that uses the subprocess module to start various other programs" building pipelines or redirecting stdin or stdout for the subprocesses? If so, you should summarize what's going on in this module. –  S.Lott Jul 12 '11 at 20:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have had the same issue.

We constantly use subprocess.Popen() to invoke external tools in a Windows environment. At some point, we had an issue where no more file descriptors were available. We drilled down to the issue and discovered that subprocess.Popen instances behave differently in Windows than in Linux.

If the Popen instance is not destroyed (e.g. by keeping a reference somehow, and thus not allowing the garbage collector to destroy the object), the pipes that were created during the call remain opened in Windows, while in Linux they were automatically closed after Popen.communicate() was called. If this is continued in further calls, the "zombie" file descriptors from the pipes will pile up, and eventually cause a Python exception IOError: [Errno 24] Too many open files.

How to Get Opened File Descriptors in Python

In order for us to troubleshoot our issues, we needed a way to get the valid file descriptors in a Python script. So, we crafted the following script. Note that we only check file descriptors from 0 to 100, since we do not open so many files concurrently.

fd_table_status.py :

import os
import stat

_fd_types = (
    ('REG', stat.S_ISREG),
    ('FIFO', stat.S_ISFIFO),
    ('DIR', stat.S_ISDIR),
    ('CHR', stat.S_ISCHR),
    ('BLK', stat.S_ISBLK),
    ('LNK', stat.S_ISLNK),
    ('SOCK', stat.S_ISSOCK)
)

def fd_table_status():
    result = []
    for fd in range(100):
        try:
            s = os.fstat(fd)
        except:
            continue
        for fd_type, func in _fd_types:
            if func(s.st_mode):
                break
        else:
            fd_type = str(s.st_mode)
        result.append((fd, fd_type))
    return result

def fd_table_status_logify(fd_table_result):
    return ('Open file handles: ' +
            ', '.join(['{0}: {1}'.format(*i) for i in fd_table_result]))

def fd_table_status_str():
    return fd_table_status_logify(fd_table_status())

if __name__=='__main__':
    print fd_table_status_str()

When simply run, it will show all open file descriptors and their respective type:

$> python fd_table_status.py
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR
$>

The output is the same by calling fd_table_status_str() through Python code. For details on the "CHR" and respecting "short-codes" meaning, see Python documentation on stat.

Testing file descriptor behavior

Try running the following script in Linux and Windows:

test_fd_handling.py :

import fd_table_status
import subprocess
import platform

fds = fd_table_status.fd_table_status_str

if platform.system()=='Windows':
    python_exe = r'C:\Python27\python.exe'
else:
    python_exe = 'python'

print '1) Initial file descriptors:\n' + fds()
f = open('fd_table_status.py', 'r')
print '2) After file open, before Popen:\n' + fds()
p = subprocess.Popen(['python', 'fd_table_status.py'],
                     stdin=subprocess.PIPE,
                     stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                     stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
print '3) After Popen, before reading piped output:\n' + fds()
result = p.communicate()
print '4) After Popen.communicate():\n' + fds()
del p
print '5) After deleting reference to Popen instance:\n' + fds()
del f
print '6) After deleting reference to file instance:\n' + fds()
print '7) child process had the following file descriptors:'
print result[0][:-1]

Linux output

1) Initial file descriptors:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR
2) After file open, before Popen:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG
3) After Popen, before reading piped output:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG, 5: FIFO, 6: FIFO, 8: FIFO
4) After Popen.communicate():
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG
5) After deleting reference to Popen instance:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG
6) After deleting reference to file instance:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR
7) child process had the following file descriptors:
Open file handles: 0: FIFO, 1: FIFO, 2: FIFO, 3: REG

Windows output

1) Initial file descriptors:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR
2) After file open, before Popen:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG
3) After Popen, before reading piped output:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG, 4: FIFO, 5: FIFO, 6: FIFO
4) After Popen.communicate():
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG, 5: FIFO, 6: FIFO
5) After deleting reference to Popen instance:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR, 3: REG
6) After deleting reference to file instance:
Open file handles: 0: CHR, 1: CHR, 2: CHR
7) child process had the following file descriptors:
Open file handles: 0: FIFO, 1: FIFO, 2: FIFO

As you can see in step 4, Windows do not behave the same as Linux. The Popen instance must be destroyed for the pipes to be closed.

Btw, the difference in step 7 shows a different issue concerning behavior of the Python interpreter in Windows, you can see more details on both issues here.

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wonderful answer! That would explain why my refactoring fixed the problem, as the Popen instances did get fully destroyed. I had previously assumed that when they fell out of scope the gc would get them, but the open pipe probably kept it around. –  Spencer Rathbun May 21 '14 at 12:10
    
Most probably there was some lingering reference to the Popen instance in your code somewhere, which did not let the GC destroy it. This issue is closely related to the overall file descriptor inheritance problem. Have a look at some more "digging" I did on inherited file descriptors in Python‌​. –  mihalop May 26 '14 at 8:17

What python version are you using? There is a known leak of file descriptors with subprocess.Popen() that might also affect subprocess.call()

http://bugs.python.org/issue6274

As you can see, this was only fixed in python-2.6

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1  
I'm currently using 2.7, so I don't think that is an issue. Though if it's happened once, it could happen again... –  Spencer Rathbun Jul 13 '11 at 17:42

The problem went away after a major refactoring, so I'm just going to note here that part of the problem I ran into was looking for memory debugging tools for python.

I have since found heapy.

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I had same problem that you had on this question. I've got a long running python script use subprocess, too. And now, I'm out of file descriptor, could you please tell me more about how your major refactoring make the problem went away? thank you –  HVNSweeting Nov 23 '12 at 10:25
1  
@HVNSweeting I broke the code base down into individual objects with well defined roles. Only one object was responsible for running subprocess, and it was created and destroyed by a master long running object that did not open any files itself. That way, when the processing object was finished, destroying it cleanly snipped the reference chain, and the garbage collector could clean up. –  Spencer Rathbun Nov 26 '12 at 14:41
    
I fixed my problem and figured out it is not relate to Subprocess. It's my mistake not close socket when error happens. Thank you for your help. –  HVNSweeting Nov 26 '12 at 15:29

File descriptors go away when the process does, so it must be the parent holding onto file descriptors (you can verify this with lsof). What does the code in the parent do?

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The project is 'glue' between various different external programs. It watches a directory for a new file, and kicks off each of the external processes in sequence. To get them to play nice, it has to move some files around after each one is done. Unfortunately, it has to live on windows machine, so I don't have lsof. –  Spencer Rathbun Jul 12 '11 at 19:46
1  
On Windows, Sysinternals Process Monitor will do the same thing. Unfortunately, neither one will help you pinpoint where in Python the files are being held open. –  geekosaur Jul 12 '11 at 19:57

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