Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sorry for the entry-level database question but I really want to learn this.

I have two tables customer_change and customer_full and I want to select rows from customer_full that same customer(same customer_id) but with different customer_points.

I wrote the following query:

SELECT * 
FROM customer_change a,customer_full b 
WHERE 
    a.ID = b.ID AND 
    a.CUSTOMER_POINTS != b.CUSTOMER_POINTS

Now it works. But it will return rows in both tables, how could I change the query to only return the rows in the second table?

Also, the returned rows may contain two rows that have the same IDs, could I modify my query to only include the first row that has this ID?

Could experts offer some help? Thanks!

share|improve this question
2  
What error is it given you? –  Dirk Jul 12 '11 at 20:02
1  
It would be useful if you posted the error message. –  a'r Jul 12 '11 at 20:02
1  
Curious, what's up with your exclamation mark? It looks special, which could just be this site, but if it is a special character, mysql might not recognize it. You can try <> instead of != if that's the case. –  Paul DelRe Jul 12 '11 at 20:05
    
@all, thanks. It is actually the ! has the problem, since it is in another character set. MySql maybe doesn't recognize it. –  Kevin Jul 12 '11 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The SQL inequality operator is <>, not !=. (Apologies: I note that != is supported in at least some implementations! As the comments on the question have pointed out, it seems to be a character set problem. I stand by the rest of my answer, though. :))

That said, I recommend learning about JOIN syntax, rather than joining tables using WHERE criteria. The former lends itself to more-readable queries, and lets you exercise finer control over how the tables are joined.

For example, your query above would be:

SELECT * 
FROM customer_change a
JOIN customer_full b ON a.ID = b.ID AND a.CUSTOMER_POINTS <> b.CUSTOMER_POINTS
share|improve this answer
    
MySQL does allows either != or <>. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/… (+1 for correction edit). –  Paul DelRe Jul 12 '11 at 20:07
1  
<> and != are the same things in MySQL... (+1 for correction edit too) –  dino Jul 12 '11 at 20:08
    
And in SQL Server, I've just found out. Updated my answer. –  Dan J Jul 12 '11 at 20:09

The * will select everything which results from the cross product of all tables in your query. You can "select" specific columns by giving their name in the SELECT clause such as:

SELECT customer_points 
FROM customer_change

Or you can select only columns from a specific table (or multiple tables) by adding the table name to the beginning of the column name followed by a period. Such as:

SELECT customer_change.customer_points, customer_full.ID
FROM customer_change, customer_full

In your case, you can select ONLY the records in the second table:

SELECT b.* 
FROM customer_change a,customer_full b 
WHERE 
    a.ID = b.ID AND 
    a.CUSTOMER_POINTS != b.CUSTOMER_POINTS

Both <> and != are acceptable "not equals" operators.

If you wanted to use JOINs, then you can do:

SELECT b.* 
FROM customer_change a
JOIN customer_full b ON a.ID = b.ID AND a.CUSTOMER_POINTS != b.CUSTOMER_POINTS
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I'd argue this is the better, more-complete answer at this point (I didn't acknowledge how to only return records from the second table...) –  Dan J Jul 12 '11 at 20:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.