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I have a page with content that looks similar to this:

<div id="level1">
    <div id="level2">
        <div id="level3">Crap i dont care about</div>
        Here is some text i want
        <br />
        Here is some more text i want
        <br />
        Oh i want this text too :)
    </div>
</div>

My goal is to capture the text in #level2 but the #level3 <div> is nested inside of it at the same level as the text I want.

Is it possible to some how exclude that <div>? Should I be modifying the document and simply removing the element before parsing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
require 'nokogiri'

xml = <<-XML
<div id="level1">
    <div id="level2">
        <div id="level3">Crap i dont care about</div>
        Here is some text i want
        <br />
        Here is some more text i want
        <br />
        Oh i want this text too :)
    </div>
</div>
XML

page = Nokogiri::XML(xml)
p page.xpath("//*[@id='level3']").remove.xpath("//*[@id='level2']").inner_text
# => "\n        \n        Here is some text i want\n        \n        Here is some more text i want\n        \n        Oh i want this text too :)\n    "

Now, you may clean the output text if you wish.

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Thank you... so it sounds like based on your response and "mu is too short"'s response, the proper way to deal with this situation is modify the document prior to parsing it out. –  Mario Zigliotto Jul 12 '11 at 21:38
    
With the given markup structure that's the best I can think of. –  Jakobinsky Jul 12 '11 at 22:03

If you're HTML fragment is in html, then you could do something like this:

doc = Nokogiri::HTML(html)
div = doc.at_css('#level2')   # Extract <div id="level2">
div.at_css('#level3').remove  # Remove <div id="level3">
text_you_want = div.inner_text

You could also do it with XPath but I find CSS selectors a bit simpler for simple cases like this.

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1  
With a more recent version of nokogiri it seems to be css(...) rather than at_css –  Besi Feb 2 at 9:47
2  
@Besi: Not really. at_css is just a css call with a first (i.e. x.at_css(s) is just x.css(s).first). So if you know there's only one match or you only want the first then you'd use at_css, if you want to work with possibly several matches then you'd use css. –  mu is too short Feb 2 at 18:29
    
thanks for clarification :-) –  Besi Feb 4 at 15:17

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