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In Ruby, how do you set a variable to a certain value if it is not already defined, and leave the current value if it is already defined?

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by "defined", do you mean "it exists in the current scope" or, "it is not == nil" ? –  zetetic Jul 12 '11 at 21:38
    
@zetetic: "it exists in the current scope" –  jrdioko Jul 12 '11 at 21:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

While x ||= value is a way to say "if x contains a falsey value, including nil (which is implicit in this construct if x is not defined because it appears on the left hand side of the assignment), assign value to x", it does just that.

It is roughly equivalent to the following. (However, x ||= value will not throw a NameError like this code may and it will always assign a value to x as this code does not -- the point is to see x ||= value works the same for any falsey value in x, including the "default" nil value):

if !x
  x = value
end  

To see if the variable has truly not been assigned a value, use the defined? method:

>> defined? z
=> nil                                                                  
>> z = nil                                                              
=> nil                                                                  
>> defined? z                                                           
=> "local-variable"                                                     
>> defined? @z                                                          
=> nil                                                                  
>> @z = nil                                                             
=> nil                                                                  
>> defined? @z                                                          
=> "instance-variable" 

However, in almost every case, using defined? is code smell. Be careful with power. Do the sensible thing: give variables values before trying to use them :)

Happy coding.

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What is it about ||= that makes it not throw a NameError if the variable is not defined? Is that built into the operator? Are there other operators that work that way? –  jrdioko Jul 12 '11 at 21:54
2  
@jrdioko "Magic" ;) Actually, it has to do with x appearing on the Left Hand Side of the assignment -- it doesn't matter if a value has not been assigned yet (it will "default" to nil). For instance, z = z.nil? # => true even when z was not currently defined. –  user166390 Jul 12 '11 at 21:57
    
@pst I guess the "defined?" method is just a more elegant alternative than fishing out the "NameError: undefined local variable or method" So the real answer is that you will know if you haven't already defined a variable when your program errors out. –  Dmitri Jul 12 '11 at 22:03
    
yeah, this is much better if you are setting variables as true/false –  Dark Passenger Jul 12 '11 at 22:06
    
@Dmitri @Codeglot Indeed. The most elegant way is to write code that can't cause a NameError! (and verified as such with good test coverage) ;-) –  user166390 Jul 12 '11 at 22:07
@variable ||= "set value if not set"

So false variables will get overridden

> @test = true 
 => true 
> @test ||= "test"
 => true 
> @test 
 => nil 
> @test ||= "test"
 => "test" 
> @test = false 
 => false 
> @test ||= "test"
 => "test" 
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It could be set to a falsey-value, however. As such, this is only approximately correct. –  user166390 Jul 12 '11 at 21:42
    
Can you clarify how that works (and how false values are handled)? –  jrdioko Jul 12 '11 at 21:49

As you didn't specify what kind of variable:

v = v
v ||= 1

Don't recommend doing this with local variables though.

Edit: In fact v=v is not needed

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It could be set to a falsey-value, however. As such, this is only approximately correct. –  user166390 Jul 12 '11 at 21:43
    
irb(main):007:0> v = v => nil // irb(main):008:0> v.class => NilClass // so same as initializing it as v = nil –  Dmitri Jul 12 '11 at 21:48
    
@Dmitri No, it is not the same, if v has a value, it won't change. That is the point. –  Victor Moroz Jul 13 '11 at 1:11

If the variable is not defined (declared?) it doesn't exist, and if it is declared then you know how you initialized it, right?

Usually, if I just need a variable whose use I don't yet know---that I know will never use as a Boolean---I initialize it by setting its value to nil. Then you can test if it has been changed later quite easily

x = nil


some code


if x do 
[code that will only run if x has changed]
end

that's all.

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It could be set to a falsey-value, however. As such, this is only approximately correct. –  user166390 Jul 12 '11 at 21:43
    
that is quite true, @pst I don't use this technique if the expected value is a Boolean. –  Dmitri Jul 12 '11 at 21:46

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