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I have a form with multiple addresses. A business address, a billing address, and a shipping address. Naturally I want to use the same code.

My razor template looks something like this:

<div class="std-form-line">
    <span class="std-form-no-label"></span>
    @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.BillingAddress.Line2, new { Class = "optional" })
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.BillingAddress.Line2)
</div>
<div class="std-form-line">
    <span class="std-form-no-label"></span>
    @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.BillingAddress.Line3, new { Class = "optional" })
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.BillingAddress.Line3)
</div>
....

And when rendered looks something like this:

<input type="text" value="" name="BillingAddress.Line1" id="BillingAddress_Line1" data-val-required="The Street Address field is required." data-val="true" class="text-box single-line">

Now say I will have the same code, for Business and shipping but it will look like this:

<div class="std-form-line">
    <span class="std-form-no-label"></span>
      @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.BusinessAddress.Line2, new { Class = "optional" })
</div>
<div class="std-form-line">
    <span class="std-form-no-label"></span>
      @Html.TextBoxFor(x => x.BusinessAddress.Line3, new { Class = "optional" })
</div>

How can I get rid of this code duplication?

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I will try to answer but I think you need to review and edit your sample code. It currently doesn't follow your narrative. –  trebormf Jul 13 '11 at 1:17
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The way I do it, is to create strongly typed Display/Editor templates for "Address".

Then call @Html.EditorFor(x=>x.BusinessAddress) or @Html.DisplayFor(x=>x.BusinessAddress)

You can also create different templates for different uses, and then optionally supply the name of the template in the Editor/DisplayFor methods.

BTW, the templates I mention may reside in the ~Views/Shared/EditorTemplates or ~Views/Shared/DisplayTemplates folders, respectively. Or they may reside with in a specific Controllers views folder, under EditorTemplates or DisplayTemplates.

Edit: Here is a link that demonstrates this. Editor Tempates

Edit 2: Here is an example to try and explain further, per your comment.

Address Model

public partial class Address
{
    public int AddressId { get; set; }
    public string Street1 { get; set; }
    public string Street2 { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
    public string Zip { get; set; }
}

Editor Template: This file is named "Address.cshtml" and located in my "~Views/Shared/EditorTemplates" folder.

@model Address

@Html.HiddenFor(model => model.AddressId)

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Street1)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Street1)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Street1)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Street2)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Street2)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Street2)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.City)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.City)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.City)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.State)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @* Populated from Helper *@
    @Html.DropDownListFor(m => m.State, new SelectList(statesDictionary, "Key", "Value"), string.Empty)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.State)
</div>

<div class="editor-label">
    @Html.LabelFor(model => model.Zip)
</div>
<div class="editor-field">
    @Html.EditorFor(model => model.Zip)
    @Html.ValidationMessageFor(model => model.Zip)
</div>

Create View: This is my view that will implement the editor template for my model. Note the line @Html.EditorForModel();

@model Address

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Create";
}

<h2>Create</h2>

<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script src="@Url.Content("~/Scripts/jquery.validate.unobtrusive.min.js")" type="text/javascript"></script>

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.ValidationSummary(true)
    <fieldset>
        <legend>Address</legend>

        @Html.EditorForModel()

        <p>
            <input type="submit" value="Create" />
        </p>
    </fieldset>
}

<div>
    @Html.ActionLink("Back to List", "Index")
</div>

Now if my model for my view was something else, that linked to an "Address", I would have used @Html.EditorFor(model => model.BusinessAddress)

As for the names, that's completely under your control. By default, they get mapped to you property names, but you can change any by supplying an object containing your html attribues in the EditorFor overloads.

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Okay so I would Create a BusinessAddress Model that extends an Address Model and then create an editor template for an address. Will the name attribute of each input be named differently so that they can be validated using the MVC3 TryValidateModel? –  Brandon シ Renfrow Jul 14 '11 at 19:06
    
I added an edit. I hope it helps. –  Jason.Net Jul 14 '11 at 19:40
    
Great, thanks for your help! –  Brandon シ Renfrow Jul 14 '11 at 20:33
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I don't see any duplication to get rid of in the DRY sense. If you have 3 similar fields on a form, you will need three similar elements in the markup.

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Why not introduce an AddressType field? All 3 address types you mention share the same fields just their type is different; what will set each appart is the value of AddressType. Make sense?

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