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In Programming in Scala, it gives a description on how to run Scala scripts from batch files (link).

For Windows

  ::#!
  @echo off
  call scala %0 %*
  goto :eof
  ::!#

I'm having a problem googling ::#!. What does this mean? I know :: denotes a comment and in Unix #! is a direction to the shell to be used, but what is it exactly here? And the ::!#?

What exactly does %0 %* mean, and is it necessary to express it like this?

Is it possible to run multiple scripts from the same batch file?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is a gimmick, but it works. It intends to replicate Unix shell's ability to invoke a particular command to process a shell file. So, here's the explanation:

::#!

Lines starting with :: are comments in Windows shell, so this is just a comment.

@echo off

Don't show lines executed from here on. The @ at the beginning ensure this line itself won't be shown.

call scala %0 %*

Transfer execution to the scala script. The %0 means the name of this file itself (so that scala can find it), and %* are the parameters that were passed in its execution.

For example, say these lines are in a file called count.bat, and you invoked it by typing count 1 2 3. In this case, that line will execute scala count 1 2 3 -- in which case you'll get an error. You must invoke it by typing count.bat.

goto :eof

Finish executing the script.

::!#

Another comment line.

So, here's the trick... Scala, once invoked, will find the file passed as the first argument, check if the first line is ::#!, ignore everything up to the line ::!# if so, and then execute the rest of the file (the lines after ::!#) as a Scala script.

In other words, it is not the Windows shell that is smart, it's Scala. :-)

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%0 indicates for the program name(the script file name maybe), %* indicates for the command line parameters list. %1 means the first parameter...

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The same arguments are used in this Javascript batch file stackoverflow.com/questions/4999395/… –  Michael Dillon Jul 13 '11 at 8:51

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