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I'm trying to use a queue with the multiprocessing library in Python. After executing the code below (the print statements work), but the processes do not quit after I call join on the Queue and there are still alive. How can I terminate the remaining processes?

Thanks!

def MultiprocessTest(self):
  print "Starting multiprocess."
  print "Number of CPUs",multiprocessing.cpu_count()

  num_procs = 4
  def do_work(message):
    print "work",message ,"completed"

  def worker():
    while True:
      item = q.get()
      do_work(item)
      q.task_done()

  q = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()
  for i in range(num_procs):
    p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker)
    p.daemon = True
    p.start()

  source = ['hi','there','how','are','you','doing']
  for item in source:
    q.put(item)
  print "q close"
  q.join()
  #q.close()
  print "Finished everything...."
  print "num active children:",multiprocessing.active_children()
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

try this:

import multiprocessing

num_procs = 4
def do_work(message):
  print "work",message ,"completed"

def worker():
  for item in iter( q.get, None ):
    do_work(item)
    q.task_done()
  q.task_done()

q = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()
procs = []
for i in range(num_procs):
  procs.append( multiprocessing.Process(target=worker) )
  procs[-1].daemon = True
  procs[-1].start()

source = ['hi','there','how','are','you','doing']
for item in source:
  q.put(item)

q.join()

for p in procs:
  q.put( None )

q.join()

for p in procs:
  p.join()

print "Finished everything...."
print "num active children:", multiprocessing.active_children()
share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason you are putting None into the queue after completion? I thought task_done() could help avoid that problem? I was trying to model my code after the example on the bottom of this page: docs.python.org/library/queue.html –  aerain Jul 12 '11 at 23:54
    
This doesn't actually work :( –  aerain Jul 13 '11 at 6:17
    
Not rating the solution, but hinting at how to have it run: move the "q =" declaration line before it's first usage in def worker() ... ;-) –  Dilettant Apr 11 at 9:13
    
@aerain - but it does work ... there is a reason i put None into the the queue. the line for item in iter( q.get, None ): is key. It tells the loop itself to exit after getting the value of None from the queue. This is what makes the actual process exit. q.join waits for all task_done calls. p.join waits for the termination of processes which can only happen if something breaks out of the look in the worker (or you call terminate on the process but that is less ideal). –  underrun Apr 11 at 16:22
    
@Dilettant - no, that won't actually change anything. q is available in the global namespace when the processes are created so the worker will actually have a copy of q when it is called. it would probably be better to specify args=(q,) in the call to multiprocessing.Process because then we are explicitly sharing the item - which is good to get in the habit of so you avoid accidentally sharing things you should/can not share. –  underrun Apr 11 at 16:31

Your workers need a sentinel to terminate, or they will just sit on the blocking reads. Note that using sleep on the Q instead of join on the P lets you display status information etc.
My preferred template is:

def worker(q,nameStr):
  print 'Worker %s started' %nameStr
  while True:
     item = q.get()
     if item is None: # detect sentinel
       break
     print '%s processed %s' % (nameStr,item) # do something useful
     q.task_done()
  print 'Worker %s Finished' % nameStr
  q.task_done()

q = multiprocessing.JoinableQueue()
procs = []
for i in range(num_procs):
  nameStr = 'Worker_'+str(i)
  p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(q,nameStr))
  p.daemon = True
  p.start()
  procs.append(p)

source = ['hi','there','how','are','you','doing']
for item in source:
  q.put(item)

for i in range(num_procs):
  q.put(None) # send termination sentinel, one for each process

while not q.empty(): # wait for processing to finish
  sleep(1)   # manage timeouts and status updates etc.
share|improve this answer
1  
while not q.empty(), is not a reliable way to know processing is finished, only when a worker grabs the last piece of work to be done. Frankly, with how you're improperly using the JoinableQueue, you don't need a JoinableQueue. If you chose not to use a one, you wouldn't need the worker threads to flag task_done. The purpose of using such a queue is so you can join it, which is exactly what you want to do at the end of this program instead of waiting for the queue to be empty. –  leetNightshade Nov 8 '12 at 22:42
    
Yes, with this method, the job finishes prematurely. –  Forethinker Dec 11 '13 at 19:26

You have to clear the queue before joining the process, but q.empty() is unreliable.

The best way to clear the queue is to count the number of successful gets or loop until you receive a sentinel value, just like a socket with a reliable network.

share|improve this answer

The code below may not be very relevant but I post it for your comments/feedbacks so we can learn together. Thank you!

import multiprocessing

def boss(q,nameStr):
  source = range(1024)
  for item in source:
    q.put(nameStr+' '+str(item))
  q.put(None) # send termination sentinel, one for each process

def worker(q,nameStr):
  while True:
     item = q.get()
     if item is None: # detect sentinel
       break
     print '%s processed %s' % (nameStr,item) # do something useful

q = multiprocessing.Queue()

procs = []

num_procs = 4
for i in range(num_procs):
  nameStr = 'ID_'+str(i)
  p = multiprocessing.Process(target=worker, args=(q,nameStr))
  procs.append(p)
  p = multiprocessing.Process(target=boss,   args=(q,nameStr))
  procs.append(p)

for j in procs:
  j.start()
for j in procs:
  j.join()
share|improve this answer

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