Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public char[] calculateGrade(int [] scores, char [] grades){
    for (int r = 0; r < scores.length; r++){
        //System.out.println(scores[r] + " ");
        if (scores[r] > 90)
            grades[r] = 'A';
        else if (scores[r] > 80)
            grades[r] = 'B';
        else if (scores[r] > 70)
            grades[r] = 'C';
        else if (scores[r] > 60)
            grades[r] = 'D';
        else
            grades[r] = 'F';
    for (int i = 0; i < grades.length; i++)
        System.out.println(grades[i]);

    }
    return grades;

}

Above is a small part of my overall program that takes scores from a file and turns them into letter grades. I need to put these letter grades into that file. The letter grade needs to correspond with the score. There are 26 different scores one line at a time. I would put my entire code in here but it is really long. Please help guys!

share|improve this question
1  
The last for loop only prints all the grades multiple times. I am really confused... –  Josh Jul 12 '11 at 23:53
    
By the way, I realize nobody else mentioned the problem with your code. Your loops are nested. So every time you read a score, you print all grades. Be careful with the brackets. –  besamelsosu Aug 22 '11 at 11:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd recommend having each method do one thing and do it well. Don't calculate grades and print them out.

public void printGrades(PrintStream ps, char [] grades) {
    for (char grade : grades) {
       ps.println(grade);
    }
}

public char[] calculateGrade(int [] scores){

    char [] grades = new char[scores.length];

    for (int r = 0; r < scores.length; r++){
        if (scores[r] > 90)
            grades[r] = 'A';
        else if (scores[r] > 80)
            grades[r] = 'B';
        else if (scores[r] > 70)
            grades[r] = 'C';
        else if (scores[r] > 60)
            grades[r] = 'D';
        else
            grades[r] = 'F';
    }
    return grades;

}
share|improve this answer
    
and I suppose, he only reads the scores from the file. So, "char [] grades" as a parameter of calculateGrade() is also a wrong approach. –  Mustafa Zengin Jul 13 '11 at 0:00
    
I dont understand, you obviously are creating the grades array in the method and returning it to the class but how does the class understand it. Isnt it a local variable? –  Josh Jul 13 '11 at 0:03
    
I took the "char [] grades" out of the parameter list after realizing that the cut & paste solution was not preferred. –  duffymo Jul 13 '11 at 0:06
    
So instead of printing the grades, how would I assign them to a file? Lets say there are 20 lines of someones name and their score, I need to put the letter grade after that score. How would I go about doing this? Sorry for the noobness... –  Josh Jul 13 '11 at 0:09
    
the file is already created –  Josh Jul 13 '11 at 0:14

Change your method to just the following:

public void calculateGrade(int[] scores, char[] grades){
    for (int r = 0; r < scores.length; r++) {
        if (scores[r] > 90)
            grades[r] = 'A';
        else if (scores[r] > 80)
            grades[r] = 'B';
        else if (scores[r] > 70)
            grades[r] = 'C';
        else if (scores[r] > 60)
            grades[r] = 'D';
        else
            grades[r] = 'F';
    }
}

There's no need to return grades since arrays are passed by reference anyways. Then in your calling method (main?), you should write grades to the file you want.

To write to a file, consult: http://www.exampledepot.com/egs/java.io/WriteToFile.html

So something like:

try {
    PrintWriter out = new PrintWriter(new BufferedWriter(new FileWriter("filename")));

    for( char grade : grades )
        out.println(grade);

    out.close();
} catch (IOException e) { }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks man but the last part is a little too complicated lol. I am a junior CS student and I haven't learned about those keywords so far. So I need to keep it simple haha. But I understand the first part! –  Josh Jul 13 '11 at 0:01
    
That's just how you write to a file. Don't worry about the try or the catch. Just think of out.println as similar to System.out.println except writing to a file. –  tskuzzy Jul 13 '11 at 0:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.