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I've got a data schema like this:

cp
    id    te    su
    1     7     2
    2     7     1
    3     6     8

cl
    id    cp    st
    1     2     5
    2     2     6
    3     1     6

us
   id    na
   ..    ..
   5     Joe
   6     Mike
   7     Tina
   ..    ..

I want to run a php function foo($te) with foo(7) to output data like this from mySQL

[0]
    su: 1
    st_list:
        [0]
            id:6
            na:Mike
[1]
    su: 2
    st_list:
        [0]
            id:5
            na:Joe
        [1]
            id:6
            na:Mike

I want to know how best to do this. Right now I'm able to use JOINs, but the result looks like this

[0]
    su: 1
    st_id:6
    st_na:Mike
[1]
    su: 2
    st_id:5
    st_na:Joe
[3]
    su: 2
    id:6
    na:Mike

The su:2 is repeated... obviously that isn't a problem in this example, the problem is that in the real thing that su represents a lot more data, that i'll be getting through "this" (whatever answer I choose) method.

EDIT: I hope you understand what I'm asking... I know a lot of you guys are way more knowledgable in mySQL and development in general than me, so that's why i'm asking in such a plain (I HAVE THS----> WANT THIS) way, because I think if I asked any more specifically I would end up making assumptions about the way it should run). I want an effecient solution, because this data is being used to populate search results.

Thanks!!!!!!!!!!

share|improve this question
    
You're going to need to make these more descriptively named and you probably should have a more descriptive desired output. –  cwallenpoole Jul 13 '11 at 5:00
    
What is the question? –  Ben Scott Jul 13 '11 at 9:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+150

You will need to loop over the results yourself and build the array in the format you want. MySQL can't give you the results in the nested format you want. Here's a rough draft (untested):

$su = 0;
$st_list = array();
$nested = array();
foreach ($results as $row) {
    if ($su != 0 && $row['su'] != $su) {
        $nested[] = compact('su', 'st_list');
    }

    if ($su != $row['su']) {
        $su = $row['su'];
        $st_list = array();
    }

    $st_list[] = array(
        'id' => $row['st_id'],
        'na' => $row['st_na'],
    );
}

$nested[] = compact('su', 'st_list');

Edit: Usually it's best to simply fetch all the results you want using a single SQL query. That is almost always the most efficient way to do it. But if it really matters to you (and this is a performance critical part of your application), the only way to know for sure is benchmark both methods. A lot depends on your database layout, number of rows, SQL indexes, etcetera.

share|improve this answer
    
I have to loop over the results to build the desired structure, but is it best for me to use JOINS to get ALL the data, and then filter through it, or should I use multiple queries and queries in loops to only 'fetch' the data that i'm going to be using (i.e. not fetch duplicate su:2's –  mazlix Jul 21 '11 at 5:55
    
I've updated my answer in response. –  Sander Marechal Jul 21 '11 at 5:59
    
ok, thanks.. I wasn't sure between more data vs more hits but ultimately smaller data which tends to be more effecient... BONUS QUESTION (if you would): will there be any problems with me adding a join on su = ___ b/c of the duplicate su's? (if not then i'll probably do it this way) –  mazlix Jul 21 '11 at 6:04
1  
I can't tell. It depends on your original SQL query that you haven't posted. My best guess is not (as long as you do an outer join, not an inner join). The reason is that you want the multiple su entries in your result set. Because the code I posted uses those to determine how to aggregate the nested array. –  Sander Marechal Jul 21 '11 at 6:20
1  
There is no problem having duplicated su's. Making a big query versus making several smaller ones is, generally, faster. The results are compressed for transmission, and you don't have the overhead of preparing every new query. Obvioulsy, the only good answer is the truth of real testing and benchmarking, but if I have to choose I bet for the big one. –  Carlos Mora Jul 21 '11 at 7:04
SELECT distinct us.id,na FROM cp
LEFT JOIN cl ON cp.su = cl.cp
LEFT JOIN us ON us.id = cl.st
where te = "7"

Does this provide the results you are looking for?

Alternately,

SELECT su,us.id,na FROM cp
LEFT JOIN cl ON cp.su = cl.cp
LEFT JOIN us ON us.id = cl.st
where te = "7"
ORDER BY su

Is closer to the formatting you asked for in your post.

share|improve this answer

In your model, you can have something like these too...

function get_te($te)
{
    $qry = $this->db->get_where('cp', array('te' => $te));
    $raw_te = $qry->result_array();
    $te = array();
    $i = 0;
    while($i < count($raw_te))
    {
        $te[$i]['su'] = $raw_te[$i]['su'];
        $qry = $this->db->select('*')
                        ->from('cl')
                        ->join('us', 'us.id = cl.id')
                        ->where('cp', $raw_te[$i]['id'])
                        ->get();
        $te[$i]['st_list'] = $qry->result_array();
        $i++;
    }
    return $te;
}
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