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I want to be able to parse any url with ruby to get the main part of the domain without the www (just the XXXX.com)

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Ruby does not handle hostname matching correctly under all conditions when matching an end entity server cert. I'm aware of some unexpected and nonsensical results. – jww Apr 9 '14 at 18:57
up vote 38 down vote accepted

This should work with pretty much any URL:

# URL always gets parsed twice
def get_host_without_www(url)
  url = "http://#{url}" if URI.parse(url).scheme.nil?
  host = URI.parse(url).host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

Or:

# Only parses twice if url doesn't start with a scheme
def get_host_without_www(url)
  uri = URI.parse(url)
  uri = URI.parse("http://#{url}") if uri.scheme.nil?
  host = uri.host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

You may have to require 'uri'.

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1  
That probably won't work if url is just www.example.com, URI doesn't react well to URIs that don't have schemes. – mu is too short Jul 13 '11 at 5:22
    
You are right. Didn't think of that. – Mischa Jul 13 '11 at 5:27
2  
You can get around that by checking u.scheme right after u = URI.parse(url) and then adding a scheme if necessary and reparsing. – mu is too short Jul 13 '11 at 5:33
    
Thanks, I'll update my answer. – Mischa Jul 13 '11 at 5:39
4  
I think these are getting too complex. This should work: URI('http://www.example.com').host.match(/[^\.]+\.\w+$/).to_s. – Chip Dec 7 '13 at 18:06

Please note there is no algorithmic method of finding the highest level at which a domain may be registered for a particular top-level domain (the policies differ with each registry), the only method is to create a list of all top-level domains and the level at which domains can be registered.

This is the reason why the Public Suffix List exists.

I'm the author of PublicSuffix, a Ruby library that decomposes a domain into the different parts.

Here's an example

require 'uri/http'

uri = URI.parse("http://toolbar.google.com")
domain = PublicSuffix.parse(uri.host)
# => "toolbar.google.com"
domain.domain
# => "google.com"

uri = URI.parse("http://www.google.co.uk")
domain = PublicSuffix.parse(uri.host)
# => "www.google.co.uk"
domain.domain
# => "google.co.uk"
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Thanks - this works great (for my limited usage so far). – Andy Triggs Oct 27 '12 at 21:42
2  
Is the last domain.domain #=> "google.com" a mistake or am I not understanding something?? – Mischa Dec 5 '12 at 7:49
    
No, it's not a mistake. The first domain is a variable, the second is the method call. The variable can be called whatever you want. – Simone Carletti Dec 5 '12 at 11:49
    
Great lib, thanks! – Damien Roche Apr 22 '13 at 1:46
3  
@SimoneCarletti My original comment was a while ago, but what I meant was that in the last example .co.uk, becomes .com all of a sudden. – Mischa Apr 12 '14 at 0:22

Just a short note: to overcome the second parsing of the url from Mischas second example, you could make a string comparison instead of URI.parse.

# Only parses once
def get_host_without_www(url)
  url = "http://#{url}" unless url.start_with?('http')
  uri = URI.parse(url)
  host = uri.host.downcase
  host.start_with?('www.') ? host[4..-1] : host
end

The downside of this approach is, that it is limiting the url to http(s) based urls, which is widely the standard. But if you will use it more general (f.e. for ftp links) you have to adjust accordingly.

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if the URL is in format http://www.google.com, then you could do something like:

a = 'http://www.google.com'
puts a.split(/\./)[1] + '.' + a.split(/\./)[2]

Or

a =~ /http:\/\/www\.(.*?)$/
puts $1
share|improve this answer
    
would these solutions work on any url? – Justin Meltzer Jul 13 '11 at 5:01
    
definitely not - it really depends on your input - are your receiving just an url at a time as input? do the urls have relative paths? do they always come with www as a subdomain? do they always have a subdomain? are they all http urls or you get urls with https, ftp, etc? and there are many more questions that could be asked - this is just to get you started :) – Tudor Constantin Jul 13 '11 at 5:08
    
That wouldn't work for a UK domains co.uk for example – Maged Makled Jan 11 at 0:42

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