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Example:

// can't forward declare with class Foo::Bar

// actual class
class Foo
{
public:
    class Bar // or enum Bar
    {
    }
};

I accept that this is not allowed under the current C++ standards, but I couldn't come up with a good reason of not allowing it though, especially with C++0x, we're now able to forward declare enums. I would imagine an argument against it would be if we foward declare nested class which turns out to be private, it wouldn't be allowed. But this wouldn't be too different to say forward declaring a class in a namespace, and then declaring it a nested class of an outer class. The compiler would simply give an error (perhaps an error message along the line of previous declaration doesn't match this declaration).

So why is it really not allowed then?

In other words (by James McNellis), "why is class Foo::Bar; without providing a definition for Foo or Bar not allowed?"

** Given that the C++ standards committee recognised the benefit of using forward declarations to reduce dependencies and compile time by introducing forward declaration of enums in C++0x, surely this is part of the same thing isn't it?

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as eric lippert has many times reiterated when answering these kinds of questions about C#, things aren't put into the C# spec without significant justification. implications of even what may seem to be a minor chance can mean a big difference in corner cases, compile times, etc., so every feature that goes in must be justified and the benefits must outweigh the costs. and, i would add, there are no "easy" features to implement. ;) –  shelleybutterfly Jul 13 '11 at 6:15
    
You mean C++, not C#? –  Zach Saw Jul 13 '11 at 6:18
    
@Zach: No, Eric Lippert discusses C#. But the same reasons are true for C++. –  Ben Voigt Jul 13 '11 at 6:24
2  
-1 for a question that was not so much a question as a springboard for expressing your dissatisfaction and then becoming combative when people tried to answer your question. stackoverflow is not a debate forum, it's a place to get help and get your questions answered. –  shelleybutterfly Jul 13 '11 at 6:35
1  
@shelley: If someone tells you "it can't be done". Wouldn't you want to find out why? –  Zach Saw Jul 13 '11 at 6:43
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The reason that it is not in the language is simply that nobody has come up with a good proposal on how to include it in the language. Features don't include themselves, someone has to write it up and explain the advantages and that there are no (or very minor) disadvantages.

The argument for not forward declaring enums (enum x;) was simply that the compiler cannot select the proper size for enum variables until it has seen how many values there are. This problem was solved by allowing you to decide for the compiler (enum x : int;). This has also been implemented and shown to work properly, before entering the standard.

See http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2008/n2764.pdf

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Nested classes most certainly CAN be forward declared:

class Foo
{
public:
    class Bar;
};

class Foo::Bar
{
};
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2  
Yes, but the first declaration must (as is the case with all members) be in the containing class definition. I think the question is really "why is class Foo::Bar; without providing a definition for Foo or Bar not allowed?" –  James McNellis Jul 13 '11 at 6:10
2  
@James: Well that's a different question, and the answer is: "How does the compiler know whether Foo should be a class or namespace?" –  Ben Voigt Jul 13 '11 at 6:22
1  
@Zach: Yes, but how does the compiler know that Foo is a class or namespace? You haven't declared Foo yet, therefore it could be either. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 13 '11 at 6:26
2  
Or perhaps the classier solution: class Foo::class Bar; –  James McNellis Jul 13 '11 at 6:40
3  
Within a single TU it doesn't much matter since namespace x { } class x { }; is ill-formed, but one could have namespace x { class foo { }; } in one TU and class x { class foo { }; }; in a second TU in the same program and the two foo are actually different (this might actually violate the ODR; I don't think it does, but I am not 100% sure and would certainly not press my luck in a real program). In any case, if that is valid, then it does matter whether x is a namespace or class in class x::foo; (among other things, the two foo would have different mangled names for sure). –  James McNellis Jul 13 '11 at 6:48
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How could you forward declare a nested class? In order to do so, you must declaration the class that it is nested in. Once you go:

class ClassName {

You have started a full class declaration. You can't partially declare a class; it's either all here or none of it is here. So what good would be forwardly declaring the inner class if the outer class has to be fully declared?

The only reason enums couldn't be forward declared until now is because their size was determined by their enumerators. This is why you have to give them an explicit size to forward declare them.

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Why must you declare the class that it is nested in? Of all the possibilities, why have you settled for a syntax that makes it impossible to forward declare a nested class? –  Zach Saw Jul 13 '11 at 6:07
    
i don't even think that prevents it; why not be able to declare the nested class in the class declaration and then flesh out the full declaration in another file? but the point is more whether the implications of any sort of forward nested class declarations would be useful enough to justify their inclusion in the language. –  shelleybutterfly Jul 13 '11 at 6:14
1  
@Zach Saw well, i'm not a compiler or spec designer so i couldn't tell ya. i just know that a feature's benefits have to outweigh it's costs, and i actually don't think you've proven it useful, just showed it could be a possible construct. regardless, stackoverflow is not really the place to have a debate; i simply tried to answer your question. it was likely not included either because it was something of limited use and therefore not thought of, or because it's usefulness was not considered to outweigh the negatives in designing the language and compilers for it. end of story. –  shelleybutterfly Jul 13 '11 at 6:28
1  
@Zach: You've proven nothing. Inner classes have dubious utility as it stands. All you've done is show that someone might want to forward declare them. That doesn't prove that it's useful. –  Nicol Bolas Jul 13 '11 at 6:28
1  
@shelley: That IS allowed (see my answer). –  Ben Voigt Jul 13 '11 at 6:29
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