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While working on a project, I've been making some changes and browsing around existing framework API docs for insight.

While perusing the Kohana docs, I noticed that the getters/setters of any given class are typically combined:

public function someProperty($value = null){
    if(is_null($value){
        return $this->_someProperty;
    }
    $this->_someProperty = $value;
    return $this;
}

Rather than:

public function setSomeProperty($value){
    $this->_someProperty = $value;
    return $this;
}

public function getSomeProperty(){
    return $this->_someProperty;
}

Is there any value in doing this (the former), beyond lessening the method count of a given class? I was always under the understanding that methods (functions in general) should be more descriptive of an action. Do other experienced developers cringe, even a tiny bit, when they see this?

I was just surprised to see a popular framework use such conventions (I haven't used Kohana of course)

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4  
notice that this is used extensively in javascript frameworks, maybe it comes from there –  Gabi Purcaru Jul 13 '11 at 6:22
1  
Code of Kohana is far from ideal. Not only because of setters/getters. –  OZ_ Jul 13 '11 at 6:36
3  
Even when combining setter and getter into one method, in this case, it's being done wrong (IMHO). Rather than checking is_null($value), they should check if func_num_args() === 0. –  binaryLV Jul 13 '11 at 6:48
1  
Good question. Though Kohana is using this for its internal libraries, you may use the getters and setters in your models as you wish to. This perfectly works for Kohana internal libraries but it is not meant to be used in your code either. I wouldn't call that a coding standard for Kohana. There is a coding standard page somewhere but there isn't a word about this case. –  Xobb Jul 16 '11 at 23:21
1  
the PHPDOC block for such a method must look like crap! –  Andrew Heath Jul 19 '11 at 9:21
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I consider this bad practise because it violates CommandQuerySeparation. Setting a value is changing state (Command). Getting a value is asking for state (Query). A method should not do both, but one thing only.

Also, it's not really obvious what a method does when it's just called username, e.g. does not have a verb, like get or set. This gets even worse in your example, because the return value is either the object itself or the property value, so its not consistent.

Moreover, getters (and setters) should be used sparingly as they will quickly convolute your API. The more getters and setters you have, the more knowledge about an object is required by collaborators of that object. If you find your objects asking other objects about their internals, chances are you misplaced the responsibilities.

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1  
Fair point well made about return value. Although PHP provides possibility to return anything (int, float, bool, string, object, null etc), each and every method should return value of only one type. In some cases null can be an exception, i.e., method might return "either int or null" or "either object or null". –  binaryLV Jul 13 '11 at 8:43
    
@binary in case of "object or null", it is often better to use use a NullObject‌​. –  Gordon Jul 13 '11 at 8:57
1  
matter of taste. As stated in wiki, "this pattern should be used carefully as it can make errors/bugs appear as normal program execution." It also may complicate design a bit. Anyway, in both cases (both NULL and NullObject), return values of methods/functions have to be consistent. –  binaryLV Jul 13 '11 at 9:07
    
@Binary that comment in the wiki can easily be ignored when using a SpecialCase, which is a variant of the NullObject :) –  Gordon Jul 13 '11 at 9:10
1  
@Travitron when I said you should use getters and setters sparingly, I didnt mean to say you should have public properties instead. What I meant (and that's explained in the linked article as well) is that you should use Tell Dont Ask instead. –  Gordon May 2 '12 at 18:10
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jQuery goes the same way as Kohana. However I think it's better to create separate methods for setting and getting. It's more obvious what the method does and I think it's more practically in code-completition in your ide. For example you type set and you get a list of all Properties you can set.

Another disadvantage is: what if you want to set a value really to null? This wouldn't work since the null is the identifier for returnin the value, you are restricted in setting specific values...

So it's nice, since you'll have to write less, but hey what are three letters (set/get) in front of your methods?

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Thanks @faileN - All three of your points hit my concerns. Method chaining autocompletion gets clouded by possible arbitrary return values, the null factor, and the self description. Again, odd how a seemingly popular framework opts for such conventions. –  Dan Lugg Jul 13 '11 at 6:30
    
Second point can be fixed by checking if func_num_args() === 0. That said, I agree that setters and getters should be implemented as different methods. –  binaryLV Jul 13 '11 at 6:51
    
@binaryLV. You're right with the checking. Didn't think about that :) Thanks –  faileN Jul 13 '11 at 8:20
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Despite the fact that Kohana uses such unusual technique for the OOP, I think you should follow coding conventions at first. But of course it's better to use separate getters and setters for every property in your classes. So, if it's possible to use them not breaking the conventions - just do it and you won't be wrong ;) . You can also read here about good habits in PHP OOP - http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/opensource/library/os-php-7oohabits/ if you've doubted about using some OOP technics. Hope that it'll help :)

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Thanks @olezhek, I've developed conventions over time that don't stray far from the beaten track of PHP pseudo-standards like Zend, etc. –  Dan Lugg Jul 13 '11 at 7:08
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I'd rather believe they had a reasonable explanation for doing it this way. For example, for easier implementation of ArrayAccess. Only way to know for sure is to ask them directly.

To answer your question, yes I cringe when I see the first method. Goes against OOP principles.

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Which principle does it violate? –  Simon Svensson Jul 13 '11 at 6:31
    
I'm not making the connection in your example, between ArrayAccess and combined getter/setters. If you offer both a getter and setter, call them accordingly in your implemented wrapper methods, no? –  Dan Lugg Jul 13 '11 at 6:36
    
Principles - keep methods simple(1 method/1 action), readability of code; ArrayAccess - tbh I remembered interface differently when I wrote it, it's actually easier to implement with standart get/set, haha. My point was that maybe it was to easier implement something like it, not ArrayAccess in particular. –  Inoryy Jul 13 '11 at 6:43
    
Yea @Inori, but I can't think of any interfaces/interface-methods that would benefit from a combined getter/setter. Also, the principal you mention is sort of defeated when you combine a getter and setter. Regardless, I'm glad you cringe too; I sort of sat there furrowing my brow as I browsed the Kohana API docs. –  Dan Lugg Jul 13 '11 at 6:54
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Why not do it like this?

public function someProperty($value = null)
{
    if (func_num_args() === 1) {
        $this->someProperty = $value;
        return $this;
    } else {
        return $this->someProperty;
    }
}

This would imo be the only correct way to implement a combined getter/setter

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2  
+1, this is certainly a way to implement it; however, I've long since accepted that this is a bad practice anyway. –  Dan Lugg Feb 28 at 13:50
    
True, i agree with you on the fact it is a bad practise. Separate getters and setters is always the better way to go. –  Daniel Kraaij Mar 3 at 8:47
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If you do it everywhere it is a good way, but than it really needs to be for everything, maybe the programmers of this framework are used to is, (it's a bit jquery alike)

However it would confuse me

For setting and getting I always use setters and getters:

   public function __set($key, $value) {
      // assign value $value to $this->key
   }

   public function __get($key) {
      // return value of this->key
   }
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Thanks @gar_onn - I used to use magic, but have shifted away from it in favor of chain-ability (with setters of course) as well as to micro-optimize. –  Dan Lugg Jul 13 '11 at 6:32
1  
And you always write names of fields? Horrible. Try autocompletion in IDE. –  OZ_ Jul 13 '11 at 6:42
2  
If you just set $this->key in setters and read it in getters without any validation etc, there's actually no point in using __get() and __set(), you can set any non-existent property without them. It is quite wrong though (just like using __get() and __set() for setting arbitrary properties). –  binaryLV Jul 13 '11 at 6:55
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