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I'm new to Resharper and I'm trying to understand why it seems to suggest:
catch (Exception) { }
for
catch { }

and

catch { }
for
catch (Exception) { }

I'm baffled.

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5 Answers 5

Basically it's offering you a way of switching between the two alternatives, rather than making a concrete recommendation of which is better.

You can change what's offered under ReSharper / Options / Code Inspection / Inspection Severity - find the relevant option and change the priority between none, hint, suggestion, warning or error.

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8  
Downvoters: Please explain your downvotes, or they're essentially useless. –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 20:12

Resharper does have another message that is more of a recommendation: it advises you not to catch the Exception class.

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Hear, hear! Both "catch {}" and "catch (Exception) {}" should be avoided. –  Dan Mar 20 '09 at 20:07

catch { } <-- supresses all errors. we should do, only if we are sure to discard any error.

catch { throw; } <-- This is not required. It is already taken care by compiler to rethrow the error to calling function. It is not required to add explicitly.

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It's just giving you alternatives to consider, which may spark some insight into improving your code. Just ignore the suggestion if it doesn't make sense.

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Because sometimes when tidying catch blocks you move to/from catch(Exception ex) to catch(Exception) to catch and vice versa, depending on whether you're trying to purely filter, log/wrap, or swallow the exception. (See me requesting the same feature for CodeRush without being aware it even existed in R#)

IIRC there may also be a difference between the two from the point of view of the code they generate/things they filter and miss

EDIT: The link was previously labelled "Empty catch is bad" hence very correct downvotes!

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While that maybe true, but according to the OP, Resharper is suggesting to use catch{} if you use catch{Exception} –  Alan Mar 20 '09 at 19:24
    
catch() { ... } is not "an Empty Catch", it is just alt syntax for "catch(Exception) { ...} " the code inside braces does not have to be empty.. .You can (should) put code inside the braces. If not, then it IS evil as you are swallowing generic Exception... –  Charles Bretana Mar 20 '09 at 19:29
1  
It's actually pretty evil whatever code you put in the braces. –  Daniel Earwicker Mar 20 '09 at 19:53
1  
Not if it's at the absolute top stackframe of a thread. Do you not think it's useful to log an exception before the whole process falls over, for example? (There's nothing to say that part of the ... isn't "throw;") –  Jon Skeet Mar 20 '09 at 20:14
    
Mea culpa - didnt actually follow the link I posted. In my mind it was article that explained the difference between catch{...} and catch (Exception) {...}. cant find anything remotely like the post I was dreaming about now - IIRC something changed from .NET 1.1 vs 2 in this area (SEH exceptions?). –  Ruben Bartelink Mar 20 '09 at 20:43

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