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Is it possible to detect "idle" time in JavaScript?
My primary use case probably would be to pre-fetch or preload content.

Idle time: Period of user inactivity or without any CPU usage

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3  
How do you define IDLE TIME? –  Itay Moav -Malimovka Mar 20 '09 at 19:17

15 Answers 15

Here is a simple script using JQuery that handles mousemove and keypress events. If the time expires, the page reload.

<script type="text/javascript">
var idleTime = 0;
$(document).ready(function () {
    //Increment the idle time counter every minute.
    var idleInterval = setInterval(timerIncrement, 60000); // 1 minute

    //Zero the idle timer on mouse movement.
    $(this).mousemove(function (e) {
        idleTime = 0;
    });
    $(this).keypress(function (e) {
        idleTime = 0;
    });
});

function timerIncrement() {
    idleTime = idleTime + 1;
    if (idleTime > 19) { // 20 minutes
        window.location.reload();
    }
}
</script>   
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10  
You're missing a semicolon after the $(document).ready(function() body. Also, in the call to setInterval, it won't work with quotes around the function name and you don't need the parentheses after it. Just: setInterval(timerIncrement, 60000) –  Jesse Roper Apr 5 '13 at 17:30
    
Agreed. Very simple and effective implementation. Also allows for quick addition of extra interval based function calls. Perfect for an auto logout script with notification –  Foo_Chow Apr 18 '13 at 20:55
1  
@Jesse: Your suggestions are all good, this is how the code should be. But I just wanted to point out that even without these changes, the code is fully functional. Semicolons at the end of an expression statement are optional and you can in fact pass a string to setInterval, which then gets evaluated as JavaScript. –  Felix Kling Nov 17 '13 at 17:51
2  
Is this not heavy on a user's system? Let's say, a user with a fairly old browser on a not that heavy pc, is working in a javascript application for half a day, and it is processing these functions every time the user moves his mouse... I wonder if this won't affect the user's experience... –  Sander Jan 21 at 13:53
1  
@Sander About the performance - it costs little to none to assign 0 to idleTime. Hey, I even made jsperf test for you: jsperf.com/setting-values It's ~660 MOps/sec, do you really want to optimize it? Don't optimize prematurely, do it when you have a bottleneck. I can assure you, it will not be idleTime = 0. –  Killah May 9 at 3:28

Here is a rough jQuery implementation of tvanfosson's idea:

$(document).ready(function(){

   idleTime = 0;

   //Increment the idle time counter every second.
   var idleInterval = setInterval(timerIncrement, 1000);

   function timerIncrement()
   {
     idleTime++;
     if (idleTime > 2)
     {
       doPreload();
     }
   }

   //Zero the idle timer on mouse movement.
   $(this).mousemove(function(e){
      idleTime = 0;
   });

   function doPreload()
   {
     //Preload images, etc.
   }

})
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Easier to use the setTimeout/clearTimeout below. –  Tracker1 Mar 20 '09 at 21:12
6  
This solution doesn't consider keyboard events. –  Daniel Silveira Mar 1 '10 at 12:43
5  
Never pass setInterval a string! Just give a function as a variable! –  Eric Oct 7 '11 at 14:08
    
This helped me today, thanks –  jammypeach Jan 12 '12 at 14:50
    
This won't actually work because passing a string to setInterval() evaluates the expression in the global scope and thus it won't find the timerIncrement() function that is inside the .ready handler function. This is yet another reason to NEVER pass strings to setInterval(). Just pass an actual function reference and you won't have this problem because they are evaluated in the current scope. –  jfriend00 Jan 26 '13 at 5:22

Similar to Iconic's solution above (with jQuery)...

//when the document is loaded
$(function(){

  //create an event handler for the mousemove
  var preLoadTimer;
  $(this).mousemove(function(e){
    //clear prior timeout, if any
    window.clearTimeout(preLoadTimer);

    //create new timeout.
    preLoadTimer = window.setTimeout(doPreLoad, 2000);
  });

});
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Without using jQuery, only JavaScript:

var inactivityTime = function () {
    var t;
    window.onload = resetTimer;
    document.onmousemove = resetTimer;
    document.onkeypress = resetTimer;

    function logout() {
        alert("You are now logged out.")
        //location.href = 'logout.php'
    }

    function resetTimer() {
        clearTimeout(t);
        t = setTimeout(logout, 3000)
        // 1000 milisec = 1 sec
    }
};

Credits: http://forums.devshed.com/showpost.php?p=1965136&postcount=10

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You could probably hack something together by detecting mouse movement on the body of the form and updating a global variable with the last movement time. You'd then need to have an interval timer running that periodically checks the last movement time and does something if it has been sufficiently long since the last mouse movement was detected.

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Important to note that the script will only be able to detect motion on the body of the page, not all user input. I don't think there's a way to get CPU or process info from javascript. –  Dave Swersky Mar 20 '09 at 19:47
    
I took the liberty of implementing your idea in jQuery. –  Peter J Mar 20 '09 at 21:14

I have created a small lib that does this a year ago:

https://github.com/shawnmclean/Idle.js

Description:

Tiny javascript library to report activity of user in the browser (away, idle, not looking at webpage, in a different tab, etc). that is independent of any other javascript libraries such as jquery.

Visual Studio users can get it from NuGet by: PM> Install-Package Idle.js

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I have tested this code working file:

var timeout = null;
    var timee = '4000'; // default time for session time out.
    $(document).bind('click keyup mousemove', function(event) {

    if (timeout !== null) {
            clearTimeout(timeout);
        }
        timeout = setTimeout(function() {
              timeout = null;
            console.log('Document Idle since '+timee+' ms');
            alert("idle window");
        }, timee);
    });
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You can do it more elegantly with underscore and jquery-

$('body').on("click mousemove keyup", _.debounce(function(){
    // do preload here
}, 1200000)) // 20 minutes debounce
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You could probably detect inactivity on your web page using the mousemove tricks listed, but that won't tell you that the user isn't on another page in another window or tab, or that the user is in Word or Photoshop, or WOW and just isn't looking at your page at this time. Generally I'd just do the prefetch and rely on the client's multi-tasking. If you really need this functionality you do something with an activex control in windows, but it's ugly at best.

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Improving on equiman's answer:

function idleLogout() {
    var t;
    window.onload = resetTimer;
    window.onmousemove = resetTimer;
    window.onmousedown = resetTimer; // catches touchscreen presses
    window.onclick = resetTimer;     // catches touchpad clicks
    window.onscroll = resetTimer;    // catches scrolling with arrow keys
    window.onkeypress = resetTimer;

    function logout() {
        window.location.href = 'logout.php';
    }

    function resetTimer() {
        clearTimeout(t);
        t = setTimeout(logout, 10000);  // time is in milliseconds
    }
}
idleLogout();

.
Apart from the improvements regarding activity detection, and the change from document to window, this script is actually called, rather than sitting idle by.

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Just a few thoughts, an avenue or two to explore.

Is it possible to have a function run every 10 seconds, and have that check a "counter" variable? If that's possible, you can have an on mouseover for the page, can you not? If so, use the mouseover event to reset the "counter" variable. If your function is called, and the counter is above the range that you pre-determine, then do your action.

Again, just some thoughts... Hope it helps.

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Well you could attach a click or mousemove event to the document body that resets a timer. Have a function that you call at timed intervals that checks if the timer is over a specified time (like 1000 millis) and start your preloading.

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For other users with the same problem. Here is a function i just made up.

It does NOT run on every mouse movement the user makes, or clears a timer every time the mouse moves.

<script>
// Timeout in seconds
var timeout = 10; // 10 seconds

// You don't have to change anything below this line, except maybe
// the alert('Welcome back!') :-)
// ----------------------------------------------------------------
var pos = '', prevpos = '', timer = 0, interval = timeout / 5 * 1000;
timeout = timeout * 1000 - interval;
function mouseHasMoved(e){
    document.onmousemove = null;
    prevpos = pos;
    pos = e.pageX + '+' + e.pageY;
    if(timer > timeout){
        timer = 0;
        alert('Welcome back!');
    }
}
setInterval(function(){
    if(pos == prevpos){
        timer += interval;
    }else{
        timer = 0;
        prevpos = pos;
    }
    document.onmousemove = function(e){
        mouseHasMoved(e);
    }
}, interval);
</script>
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Tried @freddoo solution but it didn't work for 1 minute timeouts so I've changed it slightly to record the date+time when the user last clicked on the page and in my timerIncrement function I calculate the difference between the current time and the last clicked time and if the value happens to be bigger or equal to the timeout value then I redirect:

var clickedDate = new Date();
var idleTime = 1;//

function timerIncrement() {

    var nowDate = new Date();
    var diffMs = (nowDate - clickedDate); //Milliseconds between now & the last time a user clicked somewhere on the page
    var diffMins = Math.round(((diffMs % 86400000) % 3600000) / 60000); //Convert ms to minutes

    if (diffMins >= idleTime) {
        //Redirect user to home page etc...
    }
}

$(document).ready(function () {

    var idleInterval = setInterval(timerIncrement, 60000); // 1 minute

    $(this).click(function (e) {
        clickedDate = new Date();
    });

});
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Javascript has no way of telling the CPU usage. This would break the sandbox javascript runs inside.

Other than that, hooking the page's onmouseover and onkeydown events would probably work.

You could also set use setTimeout in the onload event to schedule a function to be called after a delay.

// Call aFunction after 1 second
window.setTimeout(aFunction, 1000);
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