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I am doing feature enhancement on a piece of code, and here is what i saw in existing code. If there is a enum or struct declared, later there is always a typedef:

enum _Mode {
   MODE1 = 0,
   MODE2,
   MODE3
};
typedef enum _Mode Mode;

Similary for structure:

struct _Slot {
     void * mem1;
     int mem2;
};
typedef struct _Slot Slot;

Can't the structures be directly declared as in enum? Why there is a typedef for something as minor as underscore? Is this a coding convention?

Kindly give good answers, because i need to add some code, and if this is a rule, i need to follow it.

Please help. P.S: As an additional info, the source code is written in C, and Linux is the platform.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In C, to declare a varaible with a struct type you would have to use the following:

struct _Slot a;

The typedef allows you to make this look somewhat neater by essentially creating an alias. And allowing variable declaration like so:

Slot a;
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Your answer looks to be more logical. –  kingsmasher1 Jul 13 '11 at 8:33
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In C there are separate "namespaces" for struct and typedef. Thus, without a typedef you would have to access Slot as struct _Slot, which is more typing. Compare:

struct Slot { ... };

struct Slot s;
struct Slot create_s() { ... }
void use_s(struct Slot s) { ... }

vs

typedef struct _Slot { ... } Slot;

Slot s;
Slot create_s() { ... }
void use_s(Slot s) { ... }

Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Struct_(C_programming_language)#typedef for details, like possible namespace clash.

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so why not declare the structure as struct Slot instead of struct _Slot? –  kingsmasher1 Jul 13 '11 at 8:30
    
I've tried to illustrate that in the edit. –  vines Jul 13 '11 at 8:37
    
I upvote your answer, but i accept first one because the _ (underscore) reason is better mentioned there. –  kingsmasher1 Jul 13 '11 at 9:32
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If the following is a structure:

struct _Slot {
     void * mem1;
     int mem2;
};

you need the following to declare a variable:

struct _Slot s;

Notice the extra struct before _Slot. It seems more natural to declare a variable like Slot s, isn't it?

If you want to get rid of extra struct, you need a typedef:

typedef struct _Slot Slot;
Slot s;
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Same comment as i gave for @vines. In that case, we can declare struct as struct Slot and later do, typedef struct Slot Slot –  kingsmasher1 Jul 13 '11 at 8:31
    
@kingsmasher1: all three answers look same to me. :) –  Donotalo Jul 13 '11 at 9:00
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It's sort of code obfuscation technique which only make sense in small amount of cases.

People say it's more natural to not write "struct" and other subjective things.

But objectively, one at least a) can't forward declare such typedeffed struct, b) have to jump through one hoop when using ctags.

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