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I'm naive to Git and Linux/SSH so my question is what is the public key is used for?

Nam.

Update

Thanks for @emboss as below answer. What I'm looking for is that the server need to verify a git client request is from registered account

A registered ones are the accounts whose public key are in the server list :)

Thank you emboss!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You normally provide the git server with your public key (e.g. as it is done in github - you first have to send them your public key) first. This is then used by the server for authentication. Once you connect to the git server, you sign a message with your private key. This message is validated by the server with your previously provided public key (cf. RFC 4252 section 7). If the server is able to validate the message with your public key it can be sure that you are indeed the person you claim to be.

On the server side, the public key is also used for authentication purposes. The server typically sends its public key to you once you connect via SSH (for RSA cf. e.g.RFC4432) - this is when you are asked to accept a certain public key fingerprint. If you do accept, during this connection and subsequent connections, the server will use its private key to sign a message for generating a session key (more on that in asecond) that is being sent to you. You try to authenticate this message by using the server's public key to be sure you are talking to the right server. The message is then used to derive a symmetric encryption key to be used throughout the rest of the session.

The purpose for using symmetric keys to do the actual encryption is simply for reasons of performance, symmetric cryptography is much faster. This implies that the asymmetric public/private keys are merely used for authentication purposes.

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You got me and I got it ^_^ Thanks a lot! –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 10:38
    
It saids in your link ... the possession of a private key serves as authentication. This method works by sending a signature created with a private key of the user. The server MUST check that the key is a valid authenticator for the user, and MUST check that the signature is valid. If both hold, the authentication request MUST be accepted; otherwise, it MUST be rejected... –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 10:38
    
@Nam: You're welcome! I'm sorry, I don't understand. You are asking how this can be done? –  emboss Jul 13 '11 at 13:40

It's the key generated by ssh-keygen command on your machine. It has extension ".pub".

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I know what it is - but NOT what it is used for. Thanks for your answer. –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 9:01
    
It's used by other servers to check your identity. –  Gedrox Jul 13 '11 at 9:05
    
Do you know what a car is, but not what to use it for? –  ralphtheninja Jul 13 '11 at 9:27
    
@Skog Yeah, my case is kind of - I know what a car is but when a car is used in a show, I have question What is that car used for in this show?; of course I know cars are used to move around but in a show where to drive then? Hope I made myself clear to you –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 9:37

It's used to encrypt the git communication between you and a remote repository, ensuring that your push and pull data can't be spied on or tampered with.

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That sounds interesting. May you tell it more details or site me some urls/references? –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 9:00
    
@Michael: The actual encryption is done with symmetric session keys, no? –  emboss Jul 13 '11 at 9:25
    
@emboss: correct, but those are first encrypted using the public/private keys; I didn't want to get too technical. –  Michael Borgwardt Jul 13 '11 at 10:49
    
@emboss: OK, I see :) –  emboss Jul 13 '11 at 13:09

You can use RSA or DSA when creating the keys with ssh-keygen with the -t option. How RSA works you can read on Wikipedia

RSA involves a public key and a private key. The public key can be known to everyone and is used for encrypting messages. Messages encrypted with the public key can only be decrypted using the private key. The keys for the RSA algorithm are generated the following way:[...]

Here is a a How-To for setup your keys for github:

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Thank you for your explanation on RSA. It understand it draftly - just NOT understand how it is used in a Git transaction between me & the repository server. –  Nam G VU Jul 13 '11 at 9:39
1  
Yeah you're right, I explained how and not realy for what. With this auth mechanism 1. you don't have to type in your user/password every time (only set your private key once time) and 2. the security is better when your keys are bigh enough / have enoguh bits –  timaschew Jul 13 '11 at 10:24

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