Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a C# program to read an Excel .xls/.xlsx file and output to CSV and Unicode text. I wrote a separate program to remove blank records. This is accomplished by reading each line with StreamReader.ReadLine(), and then going character by character through the string and not writing the line to output if it contains all commas (for the CSV) or all tabs (for the Unicode text).

The problem occurs when the Excel file contains embedded newlines (\x0A) inside the cells. I changed my XLS to CSV converter to find these new lines (since it goes cell by cell) and write them as \x0A, and normal lines just use StreamWriter.WriteLine().

The problem occurs in the separate program to remove blank records. When I read in with StreamReader.ReadLine(), by definition it only returns the string with the line, not the terminator. Since the embedded newlines show up as two separate lines, I can't tell which is a full record and which is an embedded newline for when I write them to the final file.

I'm not even sure I can read in the \x0A because everything on the input registers as '\n'. I could go character by character, but this destroys my logic to remove blank lines.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would recommend that you change your architecture to work more like a parser in a compiler.

You want to create a lexer that returns a sequence of tokens, and then a parser that reads the sequence of tokens and does stuff with them.

In your case the tokens would be:

  1. Column data
  2. Comma
  3. End of Line

You would treat '\n' ('\x0a') by its self as an embedded new line, and therefore include it as part of a column data token. A '\r\n' would constitute an End of Line token.

This has the advantages of:

  1. Doing only 1 pass over the data
  2. Only storing a max of 1 lines worth of data
  3. Reusing as much memory as possible (for the string builder and the list)
  4. It's easy to change should your requirements change

Here's a sample of what the Lexer would look like:

Disclaimer: I haven't even compiled, let alone tested, this code, so you'll need to clean it up and make sure it works.

enum TokenType
{
    ColumnData,
    Comma,
    LineTerminator
}

class Token
{
    public TokenType Type { get; private set;}
    public string Data { get; private set;}

    public Token(TokenType type)
    {
        Type = type;
    }

    public Token(TokenType type, string data)
    {
        Type = type;
        Data = data;
    }
}

private  IEnumerable<Token> GetTokens(TextReader s)
{
   var builder = new StringBuilder();

   while (s.Peek() >= 0)
   {
       var c = (char)s.Read();
       switch (c)
       {
           case ',':
           {
               if (builder.Length > 0)
               {
                   yield return new Token(TokenType.ColumnData, ExtractText(builder));
               }
               yield return new Token(TokenType.Comma);
               break;
           }
           case '\r':
           {
                var next = s.Peek();
                if (next == '\n')
                {
                    s.Read();
                }

                if (builder.Length > 0)
                {
                    yield return new Token(TokenType.ColumnData, ExtractText(builder));
                }
                yield return new Token(TokenType.LineTerminator);
                break;
           }
           default:
               builder.Append(c);
               break;
       }

   }

   s.Read();

   if (builder.Length > 0)
   {
       yield return new Token(TokenType.ColumnData, ExtractText(builder));
   }
}

private string ExtractText(StringBuilder b)
{
    var ret = b.ToString();
    b.Remove(0, b.Length);
    return ret;
}

Your "parser" code would then look like this:

public void ConvertXLS(TextReader s)
{
    var columnData = new List<string>();
    bool lastWasColumnData = false;
    bool seenAnyData = false;

    foreach (var token in GetTokens(s))
    {
        switch (token.Type)
        {
            case TokenType.ColumnData:
            {
                 seenAnyData = true;
                 if (lastWasColumnData)
                 {
                     //TODO: do some error reporting
                 }
                 else
                 {
                     lastWasColumnData = true;
                     columnData.Add(token.Data);
                 }
                 break;
            }
            case TokenType.Comma:
            {
                if (!lastWasColumnData)
                {
                    columnData.Add(null);
                }
                lastWasColumnData = false;
                break;
            }
            case TokenType.LineTerminator:
            {
                if (seenAnyData)
                {
                    OutputLine(lastWasColumnData);
                }
                seenAnyData = false;
                lastWasColumnData = false;
                columnData.Clear();
            }
        }
    }

    if (seenAnyData)
    {
        OutputLine(columnData);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a ton Scott. This looks like the appropriate solution. I'm a recent CompSci graduate so it's great to see help like this available. –  Tony Trozzo Mar 22 '09 at 22:11

You can't change StreamReader to return the line terminators, and you can't change what it uses for line termination.

I'm not entirely clear about the problem in terms of what escaping you're doing, particularly in terms of "and write them as \x0A". A sample of the file would probably help.

It sounds like you may need to work character by character, or possibly load the whole file first and do a global replace, e.g.

x.Replace("\r\n", "\u0000") // Or some other unused character
 .Replace("\n", "\\x0A") // Or whatever escaping you need
 .Replace("\u0000", "\r\n") // Replace the real line breaks

I'm sure you could do that with a regex and it would probably be more efficient, but I find the long way easier to understand :) It's a bit of a hack having to do a global replace though - hopefully with more information we'll come up with a better solution.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for "you may need to work character by character" –  eglasius Mar 20 '09 at 20:16
    
I kind of like my solution (which you can see below), but I really like developing compilers, so it could be one of those "to someone with a hammer everything looks like a nail" type of things –  Scott Wisniewski Mar 20 '09 at 21:13

Essentially, a hard-return in Excel (shift+enter or alt+enter, I can't remember) puts a newline that is equivalent to \x0A in the default encoding I use to write my CSV. When I write to CSV, I use StreamWriter.WriteLine(), which outputs the line plus a newline (which I believe is \r\n).

The CSV is fine and comes out exactly how Excel would save it, the problem is when I read it into the blank record remover, I'm using ReadLine() which will treat a record with an embedded newline as a CRLF.

Here's an example of the file after I convert to CSV...

Reference,Name of Individual or Entity,Type,Name Type,Date of Birth,Place of Birth,Citizenship,Address,Additional Information,Listing Information,Control Date,Committees
1050,"Aziz Salih al-Numan
",Individual,Primary Name,1941 or 1945,An Nasiriyah,Iraqi,,Ba’th Party Regional Command Chairman; Former Governor of Karbala and An Najaf Former Minister of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform (1986-1987),Resolution 1483 (2003),6/27/2003,1518 (Iraq)
1050a,???? ???? ???????,Individual,Original script,1941 or 1945,An Nasiriyah,Iraqi,,Ba’th Party Regional Command Chairman; Former Governor of Karbala and An Najaf Former Minister of Agriculture and Agrarian Reform (1986-1987),Resolution 1483 (2003),6/27/2003,1518 (Iraq)

As you can see, the first record has an embedded new-line after al-Numan. When I use ReadLine(), I get '1050,"Aziz Salih al-Numan' and when I write that out, WriteLine() ends that line with a CRLF. I lose the original line terminator. When I use ReadLine() again, I get the line starting with '1050a'.

I could read the entire file in and replace them, but then I'd have to replace them back afterwards. Basically what I want to do is get the line terminator to determine if its \x0a or a CRLF, and then if its \x0A, I'll use Write() and insert that terminator.

share|improve this answer

I know I'm a little late to the game here, but I was having the same problem and my solution was a lot simpler than most given.

If you are able to determine the column count which should be easy to do since the first line is usually the column titles, you can check your column count against the expected column count. If the column count doesn't equal the expected column count, you simply concatenate the current line with the previous unmatched lines. For example:

string sep = "\",\"";
int columnCount = 0;
while ((currentLine = sr.ReadLine()) != null)
{
    if (lineCount == 0)
    {
        lineData = inLine.Split(new string[] { sep }, StringSplitOptions.None);
        columnCount = lineData.length;
        ++lineCount;
        continue;
    }
    string thisLine = lastLine + currentLine;

    lineData = thisLine.Split(new string[] { sep }, StringSplitOptions.None);
    if (lineData.Length < columnCount)
    {
        lastLine += currentLine;
        continue;
    }
    else
    {
        lastLine = null;
    }
    ......
share|improve this answer

Thank you so much with your code and some others I came up with the following solution! I have added a link at the bottom to some code I wrote that used some of the logic from this page. I figured I'd give honor where honor was due! Thanks!

Below is a explanation about what I needed: Try This, I wrote this because I have some very large '|' delimited files that have \r\n inside of some of the columns and I needed to use \r\n as the end of the line delimiter. I was trying to import some files using SSIS packages but because of some corrupted data in the files I was unable to. The File was over 5 GB so it was too large to open and manually fix. I found the answer through looking through lots of Forums to understand how streams work and ended up coming up with a solution that reads each character in a file and spits out the line based on the definitions I added into it. this is for use in a Command Line Application, complete with help :). I hope this helps some other people out, I haven't found a solution quite like it anywhere else, although the ideas were inspired by this forum and others.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/12640862/1582188

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.