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Is there a difference between the standard "Model View Controller" pattern and Microsoft's Model/View/ViewModel pattern?

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I kept running into this question so I wrote an article explaining the difference between MVC, MVVM, and MVP. One difference that people miss is in MVC,the controller chooses the view(ex. web server). After the view is chosen, the view's state isn't connected to the controller. MVVM, the state of the view is continuously connected to the ViewModel(has some features similar to the controller). Think WPF/datacontext. There is actually more to it than that. MVC vs MVP vs MVVM:Differences Explained - joel.inpointform.net/software-development/… –  i8abug Aug 10 '11 at 4:03
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Note that while MVVM was coined by Microsoft, plenty of non-Microsoft developers and projects have begun to adopt this pattern. This comment was brought to you by the spite-the-MS-haters department. –  BoltClock Oct 8 '13 at 5:10
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13 Answers 13

up vote 153 down vote accepted

Sorry to have to disagree with such a highly voted answer, but the ViewModel does not necessarily replace the need for separate Controllers.

The problem is: that to be independently testable*, and especially reusable when needed, a view-model has no idea what view is displaying it, but more importantly no idea where its data is coming from.

*Note: in practice Controllers remove most of the logic, from the ViewModel, that requires unit testing. The VM then becomes a dumb container that requires little, if any, testing. This is a good thing as the VM is just a bridge, between the designer and the coder, so should be kept simple.

Even in MVVM, controllers will typically contain all processing logic and decide what data to display in which views using which view models.

From what we have seen so far the main benefit of the ViewModel pattern to remove code from XAML code-behind to make XAML editing a more independent task. We still create controllers, as and when needed, to control (no pun intended) the overall logic of our applications.

The basic MVCVM guidelines we follow are:

  • Views display a certain shape of data. They have no idea where the data comes from.
  • ViewModels hold a certain shape of data and commands, they do not know where the data, or code, comes from or how it is displayed.
  • Models hold the actual data (various context, store or other methods)
  • Controllers listen for, and publish, events. Controllers provide the logic that controls what data is seen and where. Controllers provide the command code to the ViewModel so that the ViewModel is actually reusable.

We also noted that the Sculpture code-gen framework implements MVVM and a pattern similar to Prism AND it also makes extensive use of controllers to separate all use-case logic.

Basically I would encourage caution in assuming controllers are made obsolete by View-models.

I have started a blog on this topic which I will add to as and when I can. There are issues with combining MVCVM with the common navigation systems, as most navigation systems just use Views and VMs, but I will go into that in later articles.

Addendum:

An additional benefit of using an MVCVM model is that only the controller objects need to exist in memory for the life of the application and the controllers contain mainly code and little state data (i.e. tiny memory overhead). This makes for much less memory-intensive apps than solutions where view-models have to be retained and it is ideal for certain types of mobile development (e.g. Windows Mobile using Silverlight/Prism/MEF). This does of course depend on the type of application as you may still need to retain the occasional cached VMs for responsiveness.

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Isn't it that MVC is used to architect the whole (web) application, while MVVM is used inside View component of MVC ? So the whole paradigm would be M(VVM)C –  Tomasz Zielinski Jul 13 '11 at 22:59
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@Tomasz Zielinski: True, but "where they are used" was not the question (or the point of my answer). My point is that controllers are still useful in MVVM. –  TrueBlueAussie Jul 14 '11 at 7:43
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I agree. My comment was caused by sudden enlightement and not because I disagreed with you. –  Tomasz Zielinski Jul 14 '11 at 14:57
    
We also used controllers to control the "flow" of views in a wizard-like UI. –  riezebosch Aug 15 '12 at 14:28
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@Justin: I see my wording of that sentence is a little ambiguous. I actually mean unit-testing for all components is more easily supported, not specifically just improving testing of ViewModels (which as you point out don't actually do that much in MVCVM... which is what you want). The real benefit of controllers is that you are actually removing most of the requirements for testing from the ViewModel (where people keeps shoving controller logic) and putting it where it can be tested (mainly Controllers and Models). The reuse comment is specific to the VMs in that sentence. I have edited it. –  TrueBlueAussie Jun 12 '13 at 9:37
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MVVM Model-View ViewModel is similar to MVC, Model-View Controller

The controller is replaced with a View Model. The View Model sits below the UI layer. The View Model exposes the data and command objects that the view needs. You could think of this as a container object that view goes to to get its data and actions from. The View Model pulls its data from the model.

Russel East does a blog discussing more in detail Why is MVVM is different from MVC

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The sentence "The controller is replaced with a View Model" is not correct. In MVVM what does the role of the controller is databinding (or binding by convention if you use that). –  DaniCE Mar 23 '10 at 9:58
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MVVM will only make sense when using WPF's two way data binding. Otherwise MVC/MVP etc would be sufficient. –  Jeff Sep 20 '10 at 23:42
    
@Jeff wouldn't MVVM also apply to JavaFX Script? –  ArtB May 26 '11 at 16:10
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@DaniCE: Josh Smith: If you put ten software architects into a room and have them discuss what the Model-View-Controller pattern is, you will end up with twelve different opinions. … –  sll Feb 13 '12 at 20:30
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Russel East is wrong. I stopped reading after he says the view knows about the controller for MVC. This answer is wrong too. The View Model encapsulates presentation logic and state. For example, whether an action - which the view might represent with a button - is enabled or disabled. –  Peter Tseng Feb 13 '13 at 2:47
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For one thing, MVVM is a progression of the MVC pattern which uses XAML to handle the display. This article outlines some of the facets of the two.

The main thrust of the Model/View/ViewModel architecture seems to be that on top of the data (”the Model”), there’s another layer of non-visual components (”the ViewModel”) that map the concepts of the data more closely to the concepts of the view of the data (”the View”). It’s the ViewModel that the View binds to, not the Model directly.

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I think the paragraph you quoted sums it up nicely IMHO. An aspect of the ViewModel is that it is a flattened/altered version of the model for the view. Many other MV* patterns bind against the real model. –  Daniel Auger Mar 20 '09 at 21:33
    
"Many other MV* patterns bind again the real model”? Really? I thought the view was always supposed to bind to the controller in MVC, no matter what. –  Nocturne Apr 9 '11 at 15:31
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Nocturne: In classic MVC, View doesn't have much to do with controller, it binds mostly to Model. Think of it as of a robot - Model represents the position of robot's joints, View is a LCD monitor on which you see the robot, Controller is e.g. keyboard. In such setup, View depends on Model, i.e. the spatial position of robot, that you can see on the monitor is a direct representation of Model. –  Tomasz Zielinski Jul 13 '11 at 22:55
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For some reason I like this explanation better so +1 –  Marin Mar 14 '13 at 14:18
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I think the easiest way to understand what these acronyms are supposed to mean is to forget about them for a moment. Instead, think about the software they originated with, each one of them. It really boils down to just the difference between the early web and the desktop.

The first acronym, MVC, originated on the web. (Yes, it may have been there before, but the web is how it got popularized to the masses of web developers.) Think database, HTML pages, and code inbetween. Let's refine this just a little bit to arrive at MVC: For »database«, let's assume database plus interface code. For »HTML pages«, let's assume HTML templates plus template processing code. For »code inbetween«, let's assume code mapping user clicks to actions, possibly affecting the database, definitely causing another view to be displayed. That's it, at least for the purpose of this comparison.

Let's retain one feature of this web stuff, not as it is today, but as it existed ten years ago, when Javascript was a lowly, despicable annoyance, which real programmers did well to steer clear of: The HTML page is essentially dumb and passive. The browser is a thin client, or if you will, a poor client. There is no intelligence in the browser. Full page reloads rule. The »view« is generated anew each time around.

Let's remember that this web way, despite being all the rage, was horribly backward and retarded compared to the desktop. Desktop apps are fat clients, or rich clients, if you will. (Even a program like Microsoft Word can be thought of as come kind of client, a client for documents.) They're clients full of intelligence, full of knowledge about their data. They're stateful. They cache data they're handling in memory. No such crap as a full page relaod.

And this rich desktop way is probably where the second acronym originated, MVVM. Don't be fooled by the letters, by the omission of the C. Controllers are still there. They need to be. Nothing gets removed. We just add one thing: statefulness, data cached on the client (and along with it intelligence to handle that data). That data, essentially a cache on the client, now gets called »ViewModel«. It's what allows rich interactivity. And that's it.

  • MVC = model, controller, view = essentially one-way communication = poor interactivity
  • MVVM = model, controller, cache, view = two-way communication = rich interactivity

We can see that with Flash, Silverlight, and - most importantly - Javascript, the web has embraced MVVM. Browsers can no longer be legitimately called thin clients. Look at their programmability. Look at their memory consumption. Look at all the Javascript interactivity on modern web pages.

Personally, I find this theory and acronym business easier to understand by looking at what it's referring to in concrete reality. Abstract concepts are useful, especially when demonstrated on concrete matter, so understanding may come full circle.

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MVC did not originate on the web. Trygve Reenskaug introduced MVC into Smalltalk-76 in the 1970s. –  Arialdo Martini May 2 at 21:02
    
Even if it were changed to "MVC was popularized through web application design." I would argue that this is speculation without proper citation. –  Dan May 9 at 13:58
    
Arialdo: Thanks, I didn't know about Smalltalk-76. (Played with other toys back then. :) Jokes aside, it's interesting how old some of these concepts are. - @Dan, what I wrote is: "[MVC] may have been there before [the web], but the web is how it got popularized to the masses of web developers." I still think that's correct. I don't have a citation for it, but then I don't feel I need one because that MVC mass popularizing is part of my personal experience when I started as a web developer at the beginning of the last decade. Apache Struts was en vogue back then, with lots of beans for MVC. –  Lumi May 10 at 7:48
    
@Lumi I was agreeing with that statement, but it directly conflicts your previous sentence "The first acronym, MVC, originated on the web." which states a web origin as fact. It's like saying "The sky is purple. (Actually the sky is blue, but on rare occasions it has a purple-like hue.)" :P –  Dan May 10 at 13:35
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I thought one of the main differences was that in MVC, your V reads your M directly, and goes via the C to manipulate the data, whereas in MVVM, your VM acts as an M proxy, as well as providing the available functionality to you V.

If I'm not full of junk, I'm surprised no one has created a hybrid, where your VM is merely a M proxy, and C provides all functionality.

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+1. The term is the correct one i think. but about creating hybrid M-MProxy-V-C isn't that too much separation? i think it would be enough using M-V-C whereas M is a Model with full support of Binding. ;) –  ktutnik Aug 24 '10 at 13:14
    
+1. As I commented above, I think that MVC is used to architect the whole (web) application, while MVVM is used inside View component of MVC. –  Tomasz Zielinski Jul 13 '11 at 23:01
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@ktutnik: Model usually sits on the server, whereas ViewModel lives on the client. So it's no feasible for HTML to bind directly to server-side Model. Therefore we need ModelView which acts as a local, unsaved working set of data extracted from model using e.g. AJAX/JSON. –  Tomasz Zielinski Jul 13 '11 at 23:03
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MVVM is a refinement (debatable) of the Presentation Model pattern. I say debatable, because the only difference is in how WPF provides the ability to do data binding and command handling.

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You can see an explanation of the MVVM Pattern in the Windows environment:

In the Model-View-ViewModel design pattern, an app is composed of three general components. enter image description here

  • Model: This represents the data model that your app consumes. For example, in a picture sharing app, this layer might represent the set of pictures available on a device and the API used to read and write to the picture library.

  • View: An app typically is composed of multiple pages of UI. Each page shown to the user is a view in MVVM terminology. The view is the XAML code used to define and style what the user sees. The data from the model is displayed to the user, and it’s the job of the ViewModel to feed the UI this data based on the current state of the app. For example, in a picture sharing app, the views would be the UI that show the user the list of albums on the device, the pictures in an album, and perhaps another that shows the user a particular picture.

  • ViewModel: The ViewModel ties the data model, or simply the model, to the UI, or views, of the app. It contains the logic with which to manage the data from the model and exposes the data as a set of properties to which the XAML UI, or views, can bind. For example, in a picture sharing app, the ViewModel would expose a list of albums, and for each album expose a list of pictures. The UI is agnostic of where the pictures come from and how they are retrieved. It simply knows of a set of pictures as exposed by the ViewModel and shows them to the user.

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The viewmodel is an "abstract" model for your user interface elements. It must allow you to execute the commands, and actions in your view in a non-visual way (for example to test it).

If you have worked with MVC, you probably have sometime found useful to create model objects to reflect the state of your view, for example, to show and hide some edit dialog, etc. In that case you are using a viewmodel.

The MVVM pattern is simply the generalization of that practice to all the UI elements.

And it's not a Microsoft pattern, what appends is that WPF / Silverlight data-bindings are specially well-suited to work with this pattern. But nothing stops you to use it with jave server faces, for example.

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From what I can tell, the MVVM maps to the MV of MVC - meaning that in a traditional MVC pattern the V does not communicate directly with the M. In the second version of MVC, there is a direct link between M and V. MVVM appears to take all tasks related to M and V communication, and couple it to decouple it from the C. In effect, there's still the larger scope application workflow (or implementation of the use scenarios) that are not fully accounted for in MVVM. This is the role of the controller. By removing these lower level aspects from the controllers, they are cleaner and makes it easier to modify the application's use scenario and business logic, also making controllers more reusable.

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Well, generally MVC is used in Web development and MVVM is most popular in WPF/Silverlight development. However, sometimes the web architecute might have a mix of MVC and MVVM.

For example: you might use knockout.js and in this case you will have MVVM on your client side. And your MVC's server side can also change. In the complex apps, nobody uses the pure Model. It might have a sense to use a ViewModel as a "Model" of MVC and your real Model basically will be a part of this VM. This gives you an extra abstraction layer.

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I found this article very helpful to clear the mess. Read the article and the discussion below. Hope this will help beginners.

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MVVM adds the view model into the mix. This is important, as it allows you to use a lot of the binding approach of WPF, without putting all that UI specific pieces in your regular model.

I may be wrong, but I am not sure MVVM really forces the controller into the mix. I find the concept to be more in line with: http://martinfowler.com/eaaDev/PresentationModel.html. I think that people choose to combine it with MVC, not that it is built in into the pattern.

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MVVM, strictly speaking, is Presentation Model, though MVVM is becoming the preferred name for the WPF specific realization of the pattern. –  wekempf Mar 27 '09 at 21:26
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MVVMC, or perhaps MVC+, seems to be a viable approach for enterprise as well as rapid application development. While it is nice to separate the UI from business and interaction logic, the 'pure' MVVM pattern and most available examples work best on singular views.

Not sure about your designs, but most of my applications, however, contain pages and several (reusable) views and thus the ViewModels do need to interact to some degree. Using the page as controller would defeat the purpose of the MVVM altogether, so not using a "VM-C" approach for the underlying logic might result in .. well .. challenging constructs as the application matures. Even in VB-6 most of us probably stopped coding business logic into the Button event and started 'relaying' commands to a controller, right? I recently looked at many emerging framworks on that topic; my favorite clearly is the Magellan (at codeplex) approach. Happy coding!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_View_ViewModel#References

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