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I have a java application which basicaly consists of three things:

  • application core
  • web ui
  • java applet

Using web ui, users launch java applet to access services provided by application core. The application is hosted on my servers.

What if i take source code of another java applet, licensed under GPLv2 and integrate it in my applet, to provide additional feature. I also tweak the source code slightly to provide better integration with my applet and application core.

Do i have to release my whole applet's source code under GPL license or just the modified files? And when and how should i do that? Should i bundle the modified source code in applet jar?

Will there be any difference if:

  • people use this service for free
  • people pay for this service
  • i sell my whole application as closed source product to people

Edit 1:

  • application is sold to people. Core - closed source, Applet - GPL`ed, with source code.

The integrated applet can be considered as a module of the main applet - do i still have to provide source code of the whole applet or just the module?

Also, what if i use gpl'ed applet as a library/jar without modification?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice.

What if i take source code of another java applet, licensed under GPLv2 and integrate it in my applet, to provide additional feature. I also tweak the source code slightly to provide better integration with my applet and application core.

On creation time, nothing special happens, but when you distribute this to users, i.e. when they download it, they receive the applet under the terms of the GPL. So, you must provide them with source code for the whole applet.

And when and how should i do that?

You should offer the source code for download and tell users where they can get it. (Althrough I believe you could in theory offer it for mail order of something like that, but a download link would be the most convenient for both parties, I guess. Check the GPL text for details.)

Will there be any difference if:

  • people use this service for free
  • people pay for this service

No. You can charge people for GPL software; you just can't prevent them from spreading it for free to others. You can certainly charge them for using services (data, computing time) on your servers.

  • i sell my whole application as closed source product to people

Yes, that would be against the law.

Regarding Edit 1:

The integrated applet can be considered as a module of the main applet - do i still have to provide source code of the whole applet or just the module?

If it's a necessary module for the whole program to function, then the whole program is GPL'd. If it's optional, you're venturing into areas of copyright law that I'm not familiar with, though I suspect the GPL would still apply to any copy of the software that includes the GPL'd module. Ask a lawyer to be sure.

Also, what if i use gpl'ed applet as a library/jar without modification?

That makes no difference whatsoever. Once you link with it, you've created a derived work.

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4  
As far as I understand, GPL is more restrictive than what you are indicating: any derivative work must be GPL rather than "licensed under a compatible, free software license", see section 2.b). –  Sébastien Le Callonnec Jul 13 '11 at 12:16
1  
@Sébastien: I think that depends on whether the rest of the program can reasonably function without the GPL-licensed part. If I link a GPL'd module into the FreeBSD kernel, I can still distribute the rest of the kernel under its original license. The binary would be GPL'd, though. –  larsmans Jul 13 '11 at 12:21
2  
I am not sure about the situation you're describing, but here the situation is clear. The applet is modifying and built on another Java work licensed under GPL, so it should be GPL -- it should be noted that even inheriting from a GPL'd class is a derivative work. –  Sébastien Le Callonnec Jul 13 '11 at 12:30
    
Hmm, I guess you're right. Edited. –  larsmans Jul 13 '11 at 12:35
1  
@dvd, done that, though you're stretching my knowledge of copyright law. I'm a programmer, not a lawyer :) –  larsmans Jul 13 '11 at 13:31

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