Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have two eclipse Java EE 6 projects packaged in a WAR-file using maven 3. Now they should share JPA entities in a 3rd project among them, since they both use the same database.

When doing the research for my question, I found some hints mentioning for example a reference in a persistence.xml to a common jar, but I wasn't successful to make it work. So specifically asked:

1) Does the project, containing the common entities, has a persistence.xml file? If so, how does it differ from the one in the other projects?

2) How exactly are the commonly used entities referenced in the two projects? Do I use the tag in their persistence.xml for reference? And if so, would "lib/MyCommon.jar" be the right way to use, if MyCommin.jar is located in WEB-INF/lib?

3) Does it make any difference if the application is deployed as a WAR or an exploded archive in JBoss 6?

4) When deployed within eclipse via addition to server runtime and publish, is there anything different from deploying outside eclipse?

5) Is the described way putting common entities in a separate project, creating a JAR and use that JAR in the other project a sensible way to handle the problem of sharing common entity classes or is there a better way?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

1) Does the project, containing the common entities, has a persistence.xml file? If so, how does it differ from the one in the other projects?

Yes. The main difference is that the persistence.xml in the model project should define all entities and that the persistence.xml in the web projects should just reference the model project JAR file. Otherwise you keep duplicating entites in persistence.xml files.

Another possible difference is that the one in model project should use a resource local transaction type so that unit testing from within the project (e.g. using a main() method) is done very easily. The ones in web projects should of course use a datasource by e.g. JTA.


2) How exactly are the commonly used entities referenced in the two projects? Do I use the <jar-file> tag in their persistence.xml for reference? And if so, would "lib/MyCommon.jar" be the right way to use, if MyCommin.jar is located in WEB-INF/lib?

Yes and No. The <jar-file> is the right way, but you have a typo in the filename and the folder should be omitted. The lib folder is usually only used when you've an EAR and the JAR is included in EAR's lib folder.

<jar-file>MyCommon.jar</jar-file>

3) Does it make any difference if the application is deployed as a WAR or an exploded archive in JBoss 6?

No. Properly designed Java API's don't rely on the local disk file system, but just on the classpath. It makes for the classpath no difference if the WAR is expanded or not.


4) When deployed within eclipse via addition to server runtime and publish, is there anything different from deploying outside eclipse?

Technically, yes. Functionally, no.


5) Is the described way putting common entities in a separate project, creating a JAR and use that JAR in the other project a sensible way to handle the problem of sharing common entity classes or is there a better way?

It makes definitely sense. You don't want to repeat yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I tried what you said, but still something is wrong on my side. The common jar is in the (exploded) WAR's WEB-INF/lib and contains a persistence.xml under META-INF with a local PU. In the WAR's WEB-INF/classes/META-INF there's another persistence.xml with JTA PU referring to the 1st via jar-file tag. Both persistence.xml contain the db hibernate.hbm2ddl.auto set to create-drop. Is it possible that it causes problems to have Entities in both the common jar and the war application? Does all entities have to be together in the commmon or can one spread them among jars/wars? –  Geziefer Jul 13 '11 at 21:38
    
I also tried to move all my entities into the common jar and only referring to it in the 2nd persistence.xml, but the entities are not recognized during deployment of the application. Could there be anything preventing the detection or is there something else I could have configured wrong? –  Geziefer Jul 13 '11 at 22:13
    
Is it possible that there's still a bug in one of the used components? I read about Hibernate not treating the jar-file tag correctly. I'm using JBoss 6 with included Hibernate. –  Geziefer Jul 14 '11 at 8:06
    
If you have just a WAR and the JAR is in the root of /WEB-INF/lib folder, you should reference it as <jar-file>MyCommon.jar</jar-file>. Mixing <jar-file> and <class> declarations is supported. –  BalusC Jul 14 '11 at 8:15
    
Ok, thank you for the information. So, I decided to put all my entities in the common jar, since the database is common to all my applications even if they may not need all entities. In that case, is it ok that I put my original persistence.xml with the JTA datsource and the reference to it and all the hibernate settings in the JAR's META-INF and don't have any persistence.xml in the other applications since they only use the common entities but don't have their own ones? –  Geziefer Jul 14 '11 at 10:03

From my experience, each jar must have a persistence xml, and that means that each EntityManager will be bound to one persistence xml. This means that in order to have transactions that involve entities from different jars, you'll need to use a JTA provider. One option to avoid what I mentioned above, is to have some Ant or Maven task to assemble classes from different jars into a new jar which contains the final persistence xml.

Having said that, in the projects where I used a shared project to put my entities, I had to end up putting all my entities (for the reason above).

I now think that the best way to do this, is to break the system into vertical modules, where each module manages it's own entities and can reference entities in other modules just by id. This is the best way I've found to build SOA applications and normal apps too. The reason to do this, is that it reduces the coupling drastically between the entities and modules too.

A few questions to ask yourself

  • Do you really want 2 different applications to update the same database tables?
  • What are you going to do if you need to update one application but the other one should remain the same?
  • Do the entities expose more information that the application really needs?
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't the setup described in the post above yours care for what you said about transactions? I may as well put all entities in the common jar, but from a design perspective, only a few of them are common to all applications, others are only used by one of them. Concerning your questions, the database is the central point between applications and I assume that this is often the case. We indeed like to be able to update applications separately, but of course they still need to use the same entities, but which is perfectly fine if they share the same db. Exposing info is not a problem here. –  Geziefer Jul 13 '11 at 21:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.