Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running a thread in a Windows Service periodically using a Threading.Timer like so:

private Timer _timer;

public void Start()
{
    _timer = new Timer(MainLoop, null, 0, Timeout.Infinite);
}

private void MainLoop(object state)
{
    // Do something and then tell Timer to wait for a second
    _timer.Change(1000, Timeout.Infinite);
}

public void Stop()
{
    _timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);
}

My problem is that I want the Windows Service to be able to monitor the thread that the loop is running in and do something if it is found to have stopped.

Previously I was using a Thread.Sleep instead of a Timer and that meant that everything ran in a single Thread rather than individual threads in the thread pool and I could query the ThreadState of the Thread. Now that I am using a Timer the ThreadState is "Stopped" as the Thread stops once the Timer has been started.

So what is the best way for me to confirm that the thread is still running when using a Threading.Timer?

share|improve this question
    
The loop isn't running on any particular thread. When the timer period elapses, MainLoop will execute on the first available thread pool thread. If there are other things going on in your program, MainLoop will very likely execute on a different thread the next time it's called. You can't monitor the thread. The answer below that suggests using a last run time is probably the easiest way to get the effect you're looking for. –  Jim Mischel Jul 13 '11 at 14:52
    
What kind of work does the main loop spend most of its time doing? Process files? Poll database? Handle network requests? Perform a computational task? And what do you want to do if the loop is not running? –  Jason Jul 14 '11 at 5:36
    
@Jason the main loop is polling the database. I have two of these services running on different servers, one active and one passive. The passive polls the active service over TCP and if it finds that the loop has stopped then it should take over as the active. –  Martin Owen Jul 14 '11 at 7:53
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could add a try-finally block around the contents MainLoop to guarentee that the timer always gets restarted.

private void MainLoop(object state)
{
  try
  {
    // Do something and then tell Timer to wait for a second
  }
  finally
  {
    _timer.Change(1000, Timeout.Infinite);
  }
}

If you still think you need to monitor the execution of this method you could keep track of the last time the method started.

private void MainLoop(object state)
{
  _lastRunTime = DateTime.UtcNow;
  try
  {
    // Do something and then tell Timer to wait for a second
  }
  finally
  {
    _timer.Change(1000, Timeout.Infinite);
  }
}

You could then use _lastRunTime and compare it to the current time to see if the execution of MainLoop got hung up or the timer (for some obscure reason) did not restart.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Finally, a good idea –  Lourens Jul 13 '11 at 14:36
    
It stupidly hadn't occurred to me to wrap the whole thing in a try...catch. –  Martin Owen Jul 15 '11 at 8:08
add comment

Have the thread update some value that is visible to the Windows Service, and if the value is not updated, you know the thread has stopped. I dont know of any other way of monitoring the timer

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd take a different approach, creating your own thread and using a callback to signal that the thread is done. The callback passes back a result that your main thread uses to decide what to do. You don't even need a timer to do this, although you can use one to cause your worker to fire on an interval.

Here's an example that uses a WaitHandle to signal the supervisor that it's done.

class Supervisor
{
    EventWaitHandle waitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    public bool Success { get; set; }

    // launch worker thread and wait for result
    public void Start()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            Thread thread = new Thread(() => { new Worker(new DoneDelegate(WorkerDone)).DoWork(); });
            thread.IsBackground = true;
            thread.Start();
            waitHandle.WaitOne(); // wait for worker to finish
            if (!Success) break; // handle error here
        }
    }

    // callback for worker to report result
    public void WorkerDone(bool successArg)
    {
        Success = successArg;
        // wake up supervisor
        waitHandle.Set();
    }
}

public delegate void DoneDelegate(bool successArg);
class Worker
{
    public DoneDelegate Done { get; set; }
    public Worker(DoneDelegate doneArg)
    {
        Done = doneArg;
    }

    public void DoWork()
    {
        // simulate work and exception
        Random rnd = new Random();
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        try
        {
            int i = 10 / (1 - new Random().Next(5));
            Done(true);
        }
        catch
        {
            Done(false);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm going to go with Brian's answer because it is simpler but thanks a lot. –  Martin Owen Jul 15 '11 at 8:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.