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I'm trying to catch unhandled exceptions from an asynchronous delegate call. The following program illustrates the issue. I get the following output:

Delegate called.
Unhandled exception: an exception.

or

Delegate called.
EndInvoke() threw an exception: an exception.
Program ended.

or

Delegate called.
EndInvoke() threw an exception: an exception.
Program ended.
Unhandled exception: an exception.

The different results are due to the synchronization issues. How to fix the call?

using System;

namespace AsyncCallback
{
    public delegate void SampleDelegate();

    public class Program
    {
        private static SampleDelegate sampleDelegate;

        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += UnhandledException;

            sampleDelegate = ThrowException;
            var result = sampleDelegate.BeginInvoke(Callback, null);

            Console.WriteLine("Delegate called.");

            result.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();

            Console.WriteLine("Program ended.");
        }

        private static void Callback(IAsyncResult result)
        {
            try
            {
                sampleDelegate.EndInvoke(result);
                Console.WriteLine("EndInvoke() completed.");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("EndInvoke() threw an exception: {0}.", ex.Message);
                throw;
            }
        }

        private static void UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Unhandled exception: {0}.", (e.ExceptionObject as Exception).Message);
        }

        private static void ThrowException()
        {
            throw new Exception("an exception");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
What do you want to happen? You are properly catching the exception from EndInvoke(). Why are you then re-throwing it? – Cory Nelson Jul 13 '11 at 13:55
    
There's an implicit race in this program. The WaitOne() call is racing against the throw statement. Which will cause the process to shut down with an unhandled exception. This may or may not happen before the main thread has progressed past the WaitOne call. Trying to fix this race doesn't make much sense, the process is dead either way. – Hans Passant Jul 13 '11 at 15:42
    
@Cory Nelson: it looks like I'm not doing this properly, because whether or not the message is printed is not deterministic. I need to log that exception. The rethrow is simulating an unhandled exception. – Stefan Jul 14 '11 at 7:19
    
@Hans Passant: it seems to make sense from the logging perspective. I'm need to log the exception before the app dies. – Stefan Jul 14 '11 at 7:20
1  
Then use your own AutoResetEvent instead of result.AsyncWaitHandle. Set() it at the end of the try block. – Hans Passant Jul 14 '11 at 9:37

When calling a delegate asynchronously, you have two options.

Option 1: no callback. I suspect this is what you're trying to do.

SomeDelegate d;

IAsyncResult res = d.BeginInvoke(null, null);

//..do some other work in the meantime.

try
{
    // EndInvoke will wait until execution completes.
    // WaitHandle use not needed!
    d.EndInvoke(res);
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    //
}

Option 2: callback.

SomeDelegate d;

d.BeginInvoke(res =>
{
    // this is called once the delegate completes execution.

    try
    {
        d.EndInvoke(res);
    }
    catch(Exception ex)
    {
        //
    }
}, null);

//..do some other work in the meantime.

// everything pertaining to the delegate's completion is done in the callback.
// no exception handling should be done here.

Both forms are correct -- whichever one you use depends on what you're doing. They're not normally combined, as you have done.

share|improve this answer
    
What I'm trying to do is the second option but without the try/catch block. I want the exception to be unhandled by AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException handler. – Stefan Jul 14 '11 at 7:40

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