Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use gnuplot to plot execution times measured on the CPU and GPU depending on the data size. So I have two files with the execution times in it. Plotting them is straight forward.

set title "CPU vs GPU"

set xlabel "Number of Particles (* 10'000)"
set ylabel "Time in Microseconds"

plot "cpuTimes.txt" title "CPU" with linespoints, \
     "gpuTimes.txt" title "GPU" wit

The resulting plot can be found here: 1

I tried to use xtics however it doesn't shift the x-axis to start at 1 but just starts the ticks at 1. How can I shift the x-axis so it starts at 1 and ends at 50?

Update

Datafile cpuTimes.txt below

64780
129664
195490
266697
327871
391777
459150
517999
582959
647984
717377
790415
830869
900475
959599
1026041
1092899
1156022
1297471
1286325
1349227
1415936
1482857
1539580
1607389
1673436
1737098
1801568
1874431
1935975
2006892
2053077
2129867
2195117
2254467
2314478
2373546
2435416
2506850
2587302
2625556
2674799
2758387
2820720
2896794
2953550
3053817
3089501
3170513
3271537
share|improve this question
    
Some would say choosing your axes to hide data is misleading... –  Tom Jul 13 '11 at 14:04
    
@Tom I think Nils has just a single column of data. Then gnuplot stars plotting at 0 by default. This is however arbitrary. On the other hand I might just not understand the question correctly^^. –  Woltan Jul 13 '11 at 14:09
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

xtics are only to "label" the x-axis. What you are looking for is some sort of "data manipulation". I'd suggest making use of using like so:

plot "cpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 t "CPU" w lp, \
     "gpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 t "GPU" w lp

To make the plot end at 50 there are two ways:

  1. You could specify the x-range with set xrange [1:50] or with

    plot [1:50] "cpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 t "CPU" w lp, \
                "gpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 t "GPU" w lp
    
  2. You need to include every like so:

    plot "cpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 every 1::::50 t "CPU" w lp, \
         "gpuTimes.txt" u ($0+1):1 every 1::::50 t "GPU" w lp
    

    See every for documentation for further reference.

share|improve this answer
    
1 didn't work. Using 2 I got it plotting correctly, thanks! –  Nils Jul 13 '11 at 14:12
add comment

I haven't used gnuplot in awhile, but I believe you can use set xrange to adjust what is plotted.

In your case the command is:

set xrange [ 1 : 50 ]
share|improve this answer
    
Your belief is correct. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 13 '11 at 13:59
    
Tried it, doesn't work! –  Nils Jul 13 '11 at 14:03
add comment

Give an axis range in your plot command:

plot [1:50] "cpuTimes.txt"
share|improve this answer
    
Tried plot [1:50] "cpuTimes.txt" title "CPU" with linespoints doesn't work. –  Nils Jul 13 '11 at 14:04
    
ah it seems to affect the y-axis, but not the x-axis, it should affect the x-axis –  Nils Jul 13 '11 at 14:06
    
@Nils It would be easier to see what's going on if you provided a fragment of your data file. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 13 '11 at 14:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.