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I have to remove duplicated objects in a List. This List have the object Blog that is like this:

public class Blog {
    private String title;
    private String author;
    private String url;
    private String description;
    ...
}

A duplicated object is an object that have title, author, url and description equal to other object.

And i can't alter the object. I can't put new methods on it.

How do i do this?

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1  
is the equals method already overriden? –  RMT Jul 13 '11 at 14:24

13 Answers 13

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you can't edit the source of the class (why not?), then you need to iterate over the list and compare each item based on the four criteria mentioned ("title, author, url and description").

To do this in a performant way, I would create a new class, something like BlogKey which contains those four elements and which properly implements equals() and hashCode(). You can then iterate over the original list, constructing a BlogKey for each and adding to a HashMap:

Map<BlogKey, Blog> map = new HashMap<BlogKey, Blog>();
for (Blog blog : blogs) {
     BlogKey key = createKey(blog);
     if (!map.containsKey(key)) {
          map.put(key, blog);
     }
}
Collection<Blog> uniqueBlogs = map.values();

However the far simplest thing is to just edit the original source code of Blog so that it correctly implements equals() and hashCode().

share|improve this answer
    
Because it is a class generated by MyBatis, and it is generated again ever when the database is changed, then i cant alter this class. And i cant create another class because i have more ten classes to do this. But i think i'll use the map but the Key will be the concatenation of the four fields. Thank you! Very useful!! Solved my problem! Thanks again! :) –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:28
3  
Personally I would question the utility of a tool that generates an entity class like this and doesn't implement equals() or hashcode(), as it seems like this class would be broken in a lot of other ways - but YMMV. –  matt b Jul 13 '11 at 14:32

Make sure Blog has methods equals(Object) and hashCode() defined, and addAll(list) then to a new HashSet(), or new LinkedHashSet() if the order is important.

Better yet, use a Set instead of a List from the start, since you obviously don't want duplicates, it's better that your data model reflects that rather than having to remove them after the fact.

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But i cant edit the class. –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:11
  1. override hashCode() and equals(..) using those 4 fields
  2. use new HashSet<Blog>(blogList) - this will give you a Set which has no duplicates by definition

Update: Since you can't change the class, here's an O(n^2) solution:

  • create a new list
  • iterate the first list
  • in an inner loop iterate the second list and verify if it has an element with the same fields

You can make this more efficient if you provide a HashSet data structure with externalized hashCode() and equals(..) methods.

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I cant edit the Class of the object, how i do this without alter the object ? –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:14

Here is the complete code which works for this scenario:

    class Blog {
private String title;
private String author;
private String url;
public String getTitle() {
    return title;
}

public void setTitle(String title) {
    this.title = title;
}

public String getAuthor() {
    return author;
}

public void setAuthor(String author) {
    this.author = author;
}

public String getUrl() {
    return url;
}

public void setUrl(String url) {
    this.url = url;
}

public String getDescription() {
    return description;
}

public void setDescription(String description) {
    this.description = description;
}

private String description;    

Blog(String title, String author, String url, String description)
{
    this.title = title;
    this.author = author;
    this.url = url;
    this.description = description; 
}
@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    if(obj instanceof Blog)
    {
        Blog temp = (Blog) obj;
        if(this.title == temp.title && this.author== temp.author && this.url == temp.url && this.description == temp.description)
            return true;
    }
    return false;

}
@Override
public int hashCode() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    return (this.title.hashCode() + this.author.hashCode() + this.url.hashCode() + this.description.hashCode());        
}

}

Here is the main function which will eliminate the duplicates:

    public static void main(String[] args) {
    Blog b1 = new Blog("A", "sam", "a", "desc");
    Blog b2 = new Blog("B", "ram", "b", "desc");
    Blog b3 = new Blog("C", "cam", "c", "desc");
    Blog b4 = new Blog("A", "sam", "a", "desc");
    Blog b5 = new Blog("D", "dam", "d", "desc");
    List<Blog> list = new ArrayList();
    list.add(b1);
    list.add(b2);
    list.add(b3);
    list.add(b4);       
    list.add(b5);

    //Removing Duplicates;
    Set<Blog> s= new HashSet<Blog>();
    s.addAll(list);         
    list = new ArrayList<Blog>();
    list.addAll(s);        
    //Now the List has only the identical Elements

}

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If your Blog class has an appropriate equals() method defined on it, the simplest way is just to create a Set out of your list, which will automatically remove duplicates:

List<Blog> blogList = ...; // your initial list
Set<Blog> noDups = new HashSet<Blog>(blogList)

The chances are this will work transparently with the rest of your code - if you're just iterating over the contents, for example, then any instance of Collection is as good as another. (If iteration order matters, then you may prefer a LinkedHashSet instead, which will preserve the original ordering of the list).

If you really need the result to be a List then keeping with the straightforward approach, you can just convert it straight back again by wrapping in an ArrayList (or similar). If your collections are relatively small (less than a thousand elements, say) then the apparent inefficiencies of this approach are likely to be immaterial.

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I cant edit the Class of the object, how i do this without alter the object ? –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:14

Use set:

yourList = new ArrayList<Blog>(new LinkedHashSet<Blog>(yourList));

This will create list without duplicates and the element order will be as in original list.

Just do not forget to implement hashCode() and equals() for your class Blog.

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I cant edit the Class of the object, how i do this without alter the object ? –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:16

You could override the equals() method, with title, author, url and description. (and the hashCode() since if you override one you should override the other). Then use a HashSet of type <blog>.

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I cant edit the Class of the object, how i do this without alter the object ? –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:14

First step you need is to implement the equals method and compare your fields. After that the steps vary.

You could create a new empty list and loop over the original, using: if(!list2.contains(item)) and then do an add.

Another quick way to do it, is to cram them all into a Set and pull them back into a List. This works because Sets do not allow duplicates to begin with.

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2  
Wrong! Comparable won't work with a Set (you can try yourself). For a set, you need equals and hashcode. –  Bohemian Jul 13 '11 at 14:12
    
Way ahead of ya! Fixed it about 30 seconds after I wrote it! Good catch though, nothing to compare in un-ordered collections. –  Brad Gardner Jul 13 '11 at 14:25

And i can't alter the object. I can't put new methods on it.

How do i do this?

In case you also mean how do I make the object immutable and prevent subclassing: use the final keyword

public final class Blog { //final classes can't be extended/subclassed
   private final String title; //final members have to be set in the constructor and can't be changed
   private final String author;
   private final String url;
   private final String description;
    ...
}

Edit: I just saw some of your comments and it seems you want to change the class but can't (third party I assume).

To prevent duplicates you might use a wrapper that implements appropriate equals() and hashCode(), then use the Set aproach mentioned by the others:

 class BlogWrapper {
   private Blog blog; //set via constructor etc.

   public int hashCode() {
     int hashCode = blog.getTitle().hashCode(); //check for null etc.
     //add the other hash codes as well
     return hashCode;
   }

   public boolean equals(Object other) {
     //check if both are BlogWrappers
     //remember to check for null too!
     Blog otherBlog = ((BlogWrapper)other).getBlog(); 
     if( !blog.getTitle().equals(otherBlog.getTitle()) {
       return false;
     }
     ... //check other fields as well
     return true
   }
 }

Note that this is just a rough and simple version and doesn't contain the obligatory null checks.

Finally use a Set<BlogWrapper>, loop through all the blogs and try to add new BlogWrapper(blog) to the set. In the end, you should only have unique (wrapped) blogs in the set.

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No, sorry... I am saying that i have to remove duplicates on a list of Blog object without adding the methods equals and hashCode because i cant alter this method. –  Diego Faria Jul 13 '11 at 14:23
    
@Diego look at my answer, I said provide a wrapper which you can write. That doesn't change the Blog class itself. –  Thomas Jul 13 '11 at 14:32

I tried doing several ways for removing duplicates from a list of java objects
Some of them are
1. Override equals and hashCode methods and Converting the list to a set by passing the list to the set class constructor and do remove and add all
2. Run 2 pointers and remove the duplicates manually by running 2 for loops one inside the other like we used to do in C language for arrays
3.Write a anonymous Comparator class for the bean and do a Collections.sort and then run 2 pointers to remove in forward direction.



And more over my requirement was to remove almost 1 million duplicates from almost 5 million objects.
So after so many trials I ended up with third option which I feel is the most efficient and effective way and it turned out to be evaluating within seconds where as other 2 options are almost taking 10 to 15 mins.
First and Second options are very ineffective because when my objects increase the time taken to remove the duplicates increase in exponential way.

So Finally third option is the best.

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First override equals() method:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj)
{
    if(obj == null) return false;
    else if(obj instanceof MyObject && getTitle() == obj.getTitle() && getAuthor() == obj.getAuthor() && getURL() == obj.getURL() && getDescription() == obj.getDescription()) return true;
    else return false;
}

and then use:

List<MyObject> list = new ArrayList<MyObject>;
for(MyObject obj1 : list)
{
    for(MyObject obj2 : list)
    {
        if(obj1.equals(obj2)) list.remove(obj1); // or list.remove(obj2);
    }
}
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1  
This is horribly inefficient. O(N^2) or worse. Not to mention incorrect as Arrays.deepEquals() takes arrays as parameters. –  Christoffer Hammarström Jul 13 '11 at 14:10
    
@Christoffer You are totally right but this is first thing coming to my mind. –  Eng.Fouad Jul 13 '11 at 14:13
    
You can't compare Strings with ==! If i had another -1 to give i would. –  Christoffer Hammarström Jul 13 '11 at 15:29

Create a new class that wraps your Blog object and provides the equality/hashcode method you need. For maximum efficiency I would add two static methods on the wrapper, one to convert Blogs list -> Blog Wrapper list and the other to convert Blog Wrapper list -> Blog list. Then you would:

  1. Convert your blog list to blog wrapper list
  2. Add your blog wrapper list to a Hash Set
  3. Get the condensed blog wrapper list back out of the Hash Set
  4. Convert the blog wrapper list to a blog list

Code for Blog Wrapper would be something like this:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class BlogWrapper {
    public static List<Blog> unwrappedList(List<BlogWrapper> blogWrapperList) {
        if (blogWrapperList == null)
            return new ArrayList<Blog>(0);

        List<Blog> blogList = new ArrayList<Blog>(blogWrapperList.size());
        for (BlogWrapper bW : blogWrapperList) {
            blogList.add(bW.getBlog());
        }

        return blogList;
    }

    public static List<BlogWrapper> wrappedList(List<Blog> blogList) {
        if (blogList == null)
            return new ArrayList<BlogWrapper>(0);

        List<BlogWrapper> blogWrapperList = new ArrayList<BlogWrapper>(blogList
                .size());
        for (Blog b : blogList) {
            blogWrapperList.add(new BlogWrapper(b));
        }

        return blogWrapperList;
    }

    private Blog blog = null;

    public BlogWrapper() {
        super();
    }

    public BlogWrapper(Blog aBlog) {
        super();
        setBlog(aBlog);
    }

    public boolean equals(Object other) {
        // Your equality logic here
        return super.equals(other);
    }

    public Blog getBlog() {
        return blog;
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        // Your hashcode logic here
        return super.hashCode();
    }

    public void setBlog(Blog blog) {
        this.blog = blog;
    }
}

And you could use this like so:

List<BlogWrapper> myBlogWrappers = BlogWrapper.wrappedList(your blog list here);
Set<BlogWrapper> noDupWrapSet = new HashSet<BlogWrapper>(myBlogWrappers);
List<BlogWrapper> noDupWrapList = new ArrayList<BlogWrapper>(noDupSet);
List<Blog> noDupList = BlogWrapper.unwrappedList(noDupWrapList);

Quite obviously you can make the above code more efficient, particularly by making the wrap and unwrap methods on Blog Wrapper take collections instead of Lists.

An alternative route to wrapping the Blog class would be to use a byte code manipulation library like BCEL to actually change the equals and hashcode method for Blog. But of course, that could have unintended consequences to the rest of your code if they require the original equals/hashcode behaviour.

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The easiest and the most effective way would be to allow eclipse to generate and override the equals and hashcode method. Just select the attributes to be checked for duplicates when prompted and you should be all set.

Also once the list is ready, put it into a Set and you have the duplicates gone.

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