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When comparing two utf-8 strings (one being the text and the other being the pattern to find) in java for an exact match, is it required to use a Collator or is it enough to normalize both strings and use a simple charAt comparison?

For more information about internationalized text search and the use of Collators, please look at http://www.developertutorials.com/tutorials/java/text-searching-java-050524-1453/

Example: In Spanish "ch" may be a single letter, while in English is 2 letters. So the word "Chiapas" may look the same, but if that is not taken into consideration, the match will fail.

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What do you mean by "UTF-8 strings"? By the time it's a String in Java, the original binary encoding is irrelevant. –  Jon Skeet Jul 13 '11 at 14:23
    
Can you give us an example of two Strings that are "exact matches" as an edge case, so we know what you mean? –  Bohemian Jul 13 '11 at 14:32
    
Example: In Spanish "ch" may be a single letter, while in English is 2 letters. So the word "Chiapas" may look the same, but if that is not taken into consideration, the match will fail. –  rreyes1979 Jul 13 '11 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you search exact matches I think normalization is enough. You will need Collator if for instance only Collator.PRIMARY differences make sense.

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String.equals already does a comparison char-by-char, so for an exact match (i.e., not considering normalization, etc.), you can use it.

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I need to consider normalization because I am going to be handling text in different languages. –  rreyes1979 Jul 13 '11 at 14:27
    
@rreyes So what is an "exact match" for you? –  Artefacto Jul 13 '11 at 14:27
    
RReyes, it will do a char by char match. What Artefacto is hinting at is if you are using string replacement through the internationalization libraries, it will not match the Italian version of the String to the German one. Same language matches are not an issue. –  Edwin Buck Jul 13 '11 at 14:29
    
@rreyes By the way, "I need to consider normalization because I am going to be handling text in different languages" doesn't really make sense to me; I don't see the causality. –  Artefacto Jul 13 '11 at 14:30
    
@Artefacto Find all the places where a pattern appears in a text. –  rreyes1979 Jul 13 '11 at 14:31

Just use String.equals().

FYI String.getBytes() method returns an array of bytes in UTF-8 format, but that shouldn't be relevant to comparing for "exact match" - that's what String.equals(String) does.

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Strings are Unicode in Java. I dont think they are UTF-8 ... but I might be wrong on that one. –  Guillaume Jul 13 '11 at 15:07
    
String are unicode yes, but getbytes returns UTF-8 bytes - see download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/i18n/text/string.html –  Bohemian Jul 13 '11 at 15:13

Collators are for sorting. String.equals() is for equality comparisons.

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