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In C++ I'm attempting to emulate how Java handles calls to it's constructor. In my Java code, if I have 2 different constructors and want to have one call the other, I simply use the this keyword. Example:

public Constructor1(String s1, String s2)
{
    //fun stuff here
}

public Constructor2(String s1)
{
    this("Testing", s1);
}

With this code, by instantiating an object with Constructor2 (passing in a single string) it will then just call Constructor1. This works great in Java but how can I get similar functionality in C++? When I use the this keyword it complains and tells me 'this' cannot be used as a function.

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1  
You can't do it like that with C++, you would need to do something like MyObject *x = new MyObject("Testing,s1") –  Eddie Jul 13 '11 at 15:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can write an init private member function for such job, as shown below:

struct A
{
   A(const string & s1,const string & s2)
   {
       init(s1,s2);
   }
   A(const string & s)
   {
      init("Testing", s);
   }
private:

   void init(const string & s1,const string & s2)
   {
         //do the initialization
   }

};
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+1 for combining constructor overloads with default initialization the way I would have. –  AJG85 Jul 13 '11 at 15:43
    
The string arguments should be std::string const &. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 13 '11 at 16:21
    
@David: Yeah. Thats better. Edited. –  Nawaz Jul 13 '11 at 16:23

This will be possible in C++11 with constructor delegation:

class Foo {
public:
    Foo(std::string s1, std::string s2) {
        //fun stuff here
    }

    Foo(std::string s1) : Foo("Testing", s1) {}
};
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You cannot achieve this in C++. The workaround is to create a single constructor with default parameters.

e.g.

class Foo {
    public:
       Foo(char x, int y=0);  // this line combines the two constructors
       ...
 }; 

Alternatively, you can use a separate method which contains the common code. Then in your two constructors, you call the helper method with the appropriate arguments.

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This is not same as OP wants. He wants Foo(0, x) not Foo(x,0). –  Nawaz Jul 13 '11 at 15:43
    
The code the OP gave was just an example. I believe in general he just wants some way to call a different constructor. But yes, in this particular case you would have to use the second solution with a separate helper method. –  tskuzzy Jul 13 '11 at 15:48

what you are looking for is called Constructor overloading

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Another way:

Foo(int a){ *this = Foo(a,a); }
Foo(int a, int b): _a(a), _b(b){}

Its not efficient but its similar to what you want. However I do not suggest this option because the option purposed above me are better(in terms of efficiency). I just posted this to show a different way of doing it.

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One expects assignment operator to take care of releasing resources held by the object that is being assigned to. Beware of using this, not because of any possible inefficiencies, but because of correctness. Since the object is not fully constructed yet, what happens to resources assignment is supposed to release, but may not be there yet? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 13 '11 at 16:20
    
Yes sorry I didn't mention my assumption. If there is dynamic memory allocated in Foo class then there is a chance(s) for bug(s). But in the above I assumed that the operator=(const Foo&) used shallow copy. –  user814628 Jul 13 '11 at 18:03

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