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I am using the asp:FileUpLoad to upload files in my asp.net c# project. This all works fine as long as the file size does not exceed the maximum allowed. When the maximum is exceeded. I get an error "Internet Explorer cannot display the webpage". The problem is the try catch block doesn't catch the error so I cannot give the user a friendly message that they have excced the allowable size. I have seen this problem while searching the web but I cannot find an acceptable solution.

I would look at other controls, but my managemment probably wouldn't go for buying a third-party control.

In light of answer suggesting ajac, I need to add this comment. I tried to load the ajax controls months ago. As soon as I use an ajax control, I get this compile error.

Error 98 The type 'System.Web.UI.ScriptControl' is defined in an assembly that is not referenced. You must add a reference to assembly 'System.Web.Extensions, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=31bf3856ad364e35'.

I could get rid of it although I did add 'System.Web.Extensions'. So I abandoned Ajax and used other techniques.

So I need to solved this problem or a completely new solution.

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6 Answers 6

Default file size limit is (4MB) but you can change the default limit in a localized way by dropping a web.config in the directory where your upload page lives. That way you don't have to make your whole site allow huge uploads (doing so would open you up to a certain kinds of attacks).

Just set in web.config under <system.web> section. e.g. In the below example I am setting the maximum length that is 2GB

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="2097152" executionTimeout="600" />

Please note that the maxRequestLength is set in KB's and it can be set up to 2GB (2079152 KB's). Practically we don't often need to set 2GB request length, but if you set the request length higher, we also need to increase the executionTimeout.

Execution Timeout Specifies the maximum number of seconds that a request is allowed to execute before being automatically shut down by ASP.NET. (Default time is 110 seconds.)

For Details please read httpRuntime Element (ASP.NET Settings Schema)

Now if you want to show the custom message to user, if the file size is greater than 100MB.

You can do like..

if (FileUpload1.HasFile && FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength > 104857600)
{
    //FileUpload1.PostedFile.ContentLength -- Return the size in bytes
    lblMsg.Text = "You can only upload file up to 100 MB.";
}
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1  
And see here for additional errata: support.microsoft.com/kb/295626 –  Kirk Woll Jul 13 '11 at 16:35
    
I understand that I can increase the limit, but whatever I set someone can exceed it. I want to give them a friendly message in that case. –  Bob Avallone Jul 13 '11 at 17:10
    
Before uploading(Saving) file you can check the file size and give proper message to user that file size increase the limit. if(FileUpload.Lenght>TotalBytes of your limit (1024*2(MB))) {} –  Muhammad Akhtar Jul 14 '11 at 2:05
    
Thanks but it crashes as soon as I do a post back before I save the file. –  Bob Avallone Jul 14 '11 at 20:56
1  
@Bob Your problem is that IIS handles these limits without giving control back to your web application. maxRequestLength is there to protect IIS from malicious requests trying to bring it down by posting large amounts of data. As Muhammad describes your only solution is to set a bigger value for maxRequestLength than ContentLength thus still receiving the uploaded file but inform the user that you will not process it due to size restriction. –  Filburt Aug 3 '11 at 19:36

Indeed, a try catch won't help you. But here is a workaround : you could handle the error in your Global.asax Application_Error method.

Example :

void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e) 
{
    // manage the possible 'Maximum Length Exceeded' exception
    HttpContext context = ((HttpApplication)sender).Context;
    /* test the url so that only the upload page leads to my-upload-error-message.aspx in case of problem */
    if (context.Request.Url.PathAndQuery.Contains("mypage"))
        Response.Redirect("/my-upload-error-message.aspx");

}

Of course , be aware that if any other kind of error occurs on your "mypage" page, you will be redirected to the /my-upload-error-message.aspx, regardless of what happened.

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That a good thought, unfortunately, it does work. The Application_Error code is never being reached. I still get an Internet Explorer cannot display web page error. –  Bob Avallone Jul 28 '11 at 13:17
    
did you try to set a break point in the Application_error ? also : maybe there is a bug in the application_error itself ? –  Jean-Yves Pagès Jul 28 '11 at 20:18
    
Maybe also try to run your project on a real iis website, and not with your Visual Studio localhost server. –  Jean-Yves Pagès Jul 29 '11 at 8:08
  1. At the client, Flash and/or ActiveX and/or Java and/or HTML5 Files API are the only ways to test file size and prevent submit. Using a wrapper/plug-in like Uploadify, you don't have to roll your own and you get a cross-browser solution.

  2. On the server, in global.asax, put this:

    public const string MAXFILESIZEERR = "maxFileSizeErr";
    
    public int MaxRequestLengthInMB
    {
        get
        {
            string key = "MaxRequestLengthInMB";
    
            double maxRequestLengthInKB = 4096; /// This is IIS' default setting 
    
            if (Application.AllKeys.Any(k => k == key) == false)
            {
                var section = ConfigurationManager.GetSection("system.web/httpRuntime") as HttpRuntimeSection;
                if (section != null)
                    maxRequestLengthInKB = section.MaxRequestLength;
    
                Application.Lock();
                Application.Add(key, maxRequestLengthInKB);
                Application.UnLock();
            }
            else
                maxRequestLengthInKB = (double)Application[key];
    
            return Convert.ToInt32(Math.Round(maxRequestLengthInKB / 1024));
        }
    }
    
    void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        HandleMaxRequestExceeded(((HttpApplication)sender).Context);
    }
    
    void HandleMaxRequestExceeded(HttpContext context)
    {
        /// Skip non ASPX requests.
        if (context.Request.Path.ToLowerInvariant().IndexOf(".aspx") < 0 && !context.Request.Path.EndsWith("/"))
            return;
    
        /// Convert folder requests to default doc; 
        /// otherwise, IIS7 chokes on the Server.Transfer.
        if (context.Request.Path.EndsWith("/"))
            context.RewritePath(Request.Path + "default.aspx");
    
        /// Deduct 100 Kb for page content; MaxRequestLengthInMB includes 
        /// page POST bytes, not just the file upload.
        int maxRequestLength = MaxRequestLengthInMB * 1024 * 1024 - (100 * 1024);
    
        if (context.Request.ContentLength > maxRequestLength)
        {
            /// Need to read all bytes from request, otherwise browser will think
            /// tcp error occurred and display "uh oh" screen.
            ReadRequestBody(context);
    
            /// Set flag so page can tailor response.
            context.Items.Add(MAXFILESIZEERR, true);
    
            /// Transfer to original page.
            /// If we don't Transfer (do nothing or Response.Redirect), request
            /// will still throw "Maximum request limit exceeded" exception.
            Server.Transfer(Request.Path);
        }
    }
    
    void ReadRequestBody(HttpContext context)
    {
        var provider = (IServiceProvider)context;
        var workerRequest = (HttpWorkerRequest)provider.GetService(typeof(HttpWorkerRequest));
    
        // Check if body contains data
        if (workerRequest.HasEntityBody())
        {
            // get the total body length
            int requestLength = workerRequest.GetTotalEntityBodyLength();
            // Get the initial bytes loaded
            int initialBytes = 0;
            if (workerRequest.GetPreloadedEntityBody() != null)
                initialBytes = workerRequest.GetPreloadedEntityBody().Length;
            if (!workerRequest.IsEntireEntityBodyIsPreloaded())
            {
                byte[] buffer = new byte[512000];
                // Set the received bytes to initial bytes before start reading
                int receivedBytes = initialBytes;
                while (requestLength - receivedBytes >= initialBytes)
                {
                    // Read another set of bytes
                    initialBytes = workerRequest.ReadEntityBody(buffer,
                        buffer.Length);
    
                    // Update the received bytes
                    receivedBytes += initialBytes;
                }
                initialBytes = workerRequest.ReadEntityBody(buffer,
                    requestLength - receivedBytes);
            }
        }
    }
    

    Create a BasePage class that your pages will inherit and add this code to it:

    public int MaxRequestLengthInMB
    {
        get
        {
            return (Context.ApplicationInstance as Global).MaxRequestLengthInMB;
        }
    }
    
    protected override void OnInit(EventArgs e)
    {
        base.OnInit(e);
    
        CheckMaxFileSizeErr();
    }
    
    private void CheckMaxFileSizeErr()
    {
        string key = Global.MAXFILESIZEERR;
        bool isMaxFileSizeErr = (bool)(Context.Items[key] ?? false);
        if (isMaxFileSizeErr)
        {
            string script = String.Format("alert('Max file size exceeded. Uploads are limited to approximately {0} MB.');", MaxRequestLengthInMB);
            ScriptManager.RegisterClientScriptBlock(this, this.GetType(), key, script, true);
        }
    }
    

    Finally, in web.config, you MUST set maxAllowedContentLength (in bytes) greater than maxRequestLength (in kB).

<system.web>
  <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="32400" />
</system.web>

<system.webServer>
  <security>
    <requestFiltering>
      <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="2000000000" />
    </requestFiltering>
  </security>
</system.webServer>
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Thanks for this. My management has told me not to pursue solving the problems regarding file uploading. I'd like to pursue this at some point, but my schedule does not permit me to look into it at this time. –  Bob Avallone Aug 2 '11 at 15:06
    
+1: You the man! –  Jim G. Aug 20 at 21:42

You can try the asp.net tool kit upload control. It's free!

http://www.asp.net/ajax/ajaxcontroltoolkit/samples/AsyncFileUpload/AsyncFileUpload.aspx

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I switched to asyncfileupload which is better. However I still get a crash that I cannot trap when the user issues a post back. I'd like to prevent that from happening. –  Bob Avallone Jul 22 '11 at 21:07

This seems to be problem of session timeout, increase session time and then try again. You can set session timout in web.config file

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In your web.config, set the max allowed content lenght higher than what you want to accept:

<system.webServer>
  <security>
    <requestFiltering>
      <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="2000000000" />
    </requestFiltering>
  </security>
</system.webServer>

Then, in global.asax, use Application_BeginRequest to set your own limit:

  private const int MyMaxContentLength = 10000; //Wathever you want to accept as max file.
  protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
     if (  Request.HttpMethod == "POST"
        && Request.ContentLength > MyMaxContentLength)
     {
        Response.Redirect ("~/errorFileTooBig.aspx");
     }
  }
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