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C++ initialization lists

What is the difference between member-wise initialization and direct initialization in a class? What is the difference between the two constructors defined in the class?

class A
{
    public:
    int x;
    int y;
    A(int a, int b) : x(a), y(b)
    {}

    A(int a, int b)
    {
        x = a;
        y = b;
    }
};
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marked as duplicate by Jacob, orlp, hammar, Karoly Horvath, Mark B Jul 13 '11 at 17:06

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The theoretical answers have been given by other members.

Pragmatically, member-wise initialization is used in these cases :

  • You have a reference attribute (MyClass & mMyClass) in your class. You need to do a member-wise initialization, otherwise, it doesn't compile.
  • You have a constant attribute in you class (const MyClass mMyClass). You also need to do a member-wise initialization, otherwise, it doesn't compile.
  • You have an attribute with no default constructor in your class (MyClass mMyClass with no constructor MyClass::MyClass()). You also need to do a member-wise initialization, otherwise, it doesn't compile.
  • You have a monstruously large attribute object (MyClass mMyClass and sizeof(MyClass) = 1000000000). With member-wise initialization, you build it only once. With direct initialization in the constructor, it is built twice.
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This was the kind of answer I was looking for. –  cppcoder Jul 13 '11 at 17:10
    
My pleasure! Though I'll be even more pleased if you accepted it! =) (Can you do it when it's closed?) –  Fezvez Jul 13 '11 at 17:12

First one uses initialization and second one does NOT use initialization, it uses assignment. In the second one, the members x and y are default-initialized first (with zero), and then they're assigned with a and b respectively.

Also note that in the second one, members are default initialized only if the types of members are having non-trivial default constructor. Otherwise, there is no initialization (as @James noted in the comment).

Now see this topic to know:

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+1. Although for "int" members the effect is the same. –  Nemo Jul 13 '11 at 16:56
    
In the second, there is only default initialization for types with a non-trivial default constructor. Otherwise, there is no initialization. –  James Kanze Jul 13 '11 at 16:58
    
@James: In this example, the types of x and y is int, hence its default-initialization. But your comment makes it more complete. Let me add it to my answer. –  Nawaz Jul 13 '11 at 17:00
    
@Nawaz In this example, the types are int, which is a POD, so there is no initialization. (But you got it right in the modification of your response.) –  James Kanze Jul 14 '11 at 8:51

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