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Okay... We have a contact books in Exchange that gets exported into an XML file... that gets used by our intranet... for our Associate Directory. "Something" happened that caused a chain of events that lead to the XML getting updated.

Apparently, our Squirrel Mail server uses a Perl script to transform this XML into a global.abook.

I'm not versed in Perl, but the generic idea's seem easy to follow: Traversing the XML, for each person pull "Nickname", Full Name, Email & Title and put into global.abook.

I'm certain the OLD XML file didn't have the Root\XSD:Schema and Root\DataRoot layout. Uncertain as to what the best format for an update on this would be.

Perl Script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;

use XML::Parser;
use Data::Dumper;

my $url = 'http://intranet.mycompany.org/directory/directory.xml';
my $output = '/var/lib/squirrelmail/prefs/global.gabook';

my $file = "curl -sS '$url' |";
my $parser = new XML::Parser(Style => 'Tree');
my $tree = $parser->parsefile($file)->[1];

sub extract {
        my ($string, $record) = @_;
        for (my $i = 0; $i < @{$record}.''; $i++) {
                if ($record->[$i] eq $string) {
                        return $record->[$i + 1][2];
                }
        }
        return undef;
}

open FILE, "> $output"
        or die "Couldn't open: $!";
for (my $i = 4; $i < @{$tree}.''; $i += 4) {
        my $record = $tree->[$i];
        my $full = &extract('DisplayName', $record);
        my $title = &extract('JobTitle', $record);
        my $email = &extract('EMailDisplayName', $record);
        next unless($email);
        my $nickname;
        # Nickname is the first part of the email address
        if ($email =~ /^(\w+)\@/) {
                $nickname = $1;
        }
        print FILE "$nickname|$full||$email|$title" . "\n";
}
close FILE

XML File:

<?xml version="1.0" standalone="yes"?>
<root xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:od="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:officedata">
  <xsd:schema>
  ...
  </xsd:schema>
  <dataroot xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" generated="2011-07-12T14:14:13">
    <ROW>
      <DisplayName>John Doe</DisplayName>
      <FirstName>John</FirstName>
      <LastName>Doe</LastName>
      <JobTitle>I.D. 10 Technologist</JobTitle>
      <Company>My Company</Company>
      <Department>Administration</Department>
      <FileAs>Doe, John</FileAs>
      <BusinessPhone>(800) 867-5309</BusinessPhone>
      <EMailAddress>jdoe@mycompany.org</EMailAddress>
      <EMailAddressType>SMTP</EMailAddressType>
      <EMailDisplayName>jdoe@mycompany.org</EMailDisplayName>
      <Initials>J.D.</Initials>
      <Private>0</Private>
    </ROW>
    <ROW>
      ...
    </ROW>
  </dataroot>
</root>

Desired Text file:

jdoe|John Doe||jdoe@atlanticgeneral.org|I.D. 10 Technician
...
...
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by omz, Wooble, Zaid, musiKk, Dori Jul 14 '11 at 7:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
That's not even Python! It's a Perl script, as you can see from the shebang (#!/usr/bin/perl). –  Santa Jul 13 '11 at 17:25
    
I changed "Python" to "Perl" throughout. Makes more sense now. –  Gareth Rees Jul 13 '11 at 17:28
    
@GarethRees Yeah... was just coming back to change that... to much on my mind. Thanks. –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 17:32
    
at a glance I'd use lexical filehandles's and 3 arg open. But that won't solve your problem. –  xenoterracide Jul 13 '11 at 17:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Is this what you were looking for?

use strict;
use warnings;
use XML::Simple;
use LWP::Simple;


my $url = 'http://intranet.mycompany.org/directory/directory.xml';
my $outfile = '/var/lib/squirrelmail/prefs/global.gabook';


my $xml = get( $url );
my $structure = XMLin( $xml );

open my $out_fh, '>', $outfile or die $!;
foreach my $row ( @{ $structure->{dataroot}{ROW} } ) {
    next unless exists $row->{FileAs} and defined $row->{FileAs};
    my( $email, $name, $title ) = map{
        warn "Warning: $_ is undefined for $row->{FileAs}."
            unless exists $row->{$_} and defined $row->{$_};
        $row->{$_} || '';
    } qw/ EMailAddress DisplayName JobTitle /;
    my $nick;
    if( $email =~ m/^([^@]+)@/ ) {
        $nick = $1;
    } else {
        $nick = '';
        warn "Warning: No nickname for $row->{FileAs}.";
    }
    print $out_fh "$nick|$name||$email|$title\n";
}

close $out_fh or die $!;

If your XML is not terribly complex, XML::Simple is an easy solution. Also, I don't see a big need for using curl from the shell when you could just use LWP::Simple from within Perl. You could easily modify the above to become closer in its dependencies to your original script if you like though. My use of LWP::Simple could be replaced by your curl.

I added on-screen warnings and default behavior in the case of a particular field not containing anything or not being present. For example, if EMailAddress is missing for a given row, you will get a couple of warnings about that. But a default empty string will be inserted into that column position for graceful recovery. If you considered such an issue to be serious enough you could change the warns to die.

I'm also skipping any ROW that doesn't have a defined FileAs tag, under the assumption that at least one tag in particular has to exist for the record to be valid. You could alter that to taste, but I would keep some form of graceful 'move on if it's not a valid record' code in there just in case.

share|improve this answer
    
"Can't locate XML/Simple.pm in @INC (@INC contains: ... ..). –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 19:17
    
That means you need to have XML::Simple installed on your system. That could be as simple as typing cpan XML::Simple. But cpan.org/modules/INSTALL.html is an 'official' description of module installation, and perlmonks.org/?node_id=693828 is an even more thorough tutorial on the topic. It doesn't have to be intimidating. –  DavidO Jul 13 '11 at 19:26
1  
cpan worked wonders on my redhat box (hadn't tried similar on my Windows Eclipse/VS debugger yet). I had to change some things (mainly a couple wrong fields chosen on my part and a typo on my part) and I ended up doing the single line "my $nick =..." from ikegami. I like the warnings (which are being piped to a log file). –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 20:32
    
@DavidO, @Werner, Nit: doesn't work if there's only one ROW. XML::Simple is so hard to get right. (And slow.) –  ikegami Jul 13 '11 at 21:51
    
ikegami is correct that in the case of a single-row XML input XML::Simple changes the shape of the datastructure. And the ForceArray=>1 option is not much of a help in this case. Frustrating, and an eye opener. While my solution may be working for you, ikegami should get the "check mark" on this one, as his isn't sensitive to the edge case of a single row. Kudos, and thanks for pointing it out, ikegami. –  DavidO Jul 14 '11 at 7:08

XML::Parser is rather cryptic. I use XML::LibXML.

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;

use XML::LibXML               qw( );
use XML::LibXML::XPathContext qw( );

my $xml = <<'__EOI__';
<?xml version="1.0" standalone="yes"?>
<root xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:od="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:officedata">
  <xsd:schema>
  ...
  </xsd:schema>
  <dataroot xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" generated="2011-07-12T14:14:13">
    <ROW>
      <DisplayName>John Doe</DisplayName>
      <FirstName>John</FirstName>
      <LastName>Doe</LastName>
      <JobTitle>I.D. 10 Technologist</JobTitle>
      <Company>My Company</Company>
      <Department>Administration</Department>
      <FileAs>Doe, John</FileAs>
      <BusinessPhone>(800) 867-5309</BusinessPhone>
      <EMailAddress>jdoe@mycompany.org</EMailAddress>
      <EMailAddressType>SMTP</EMailAddressType>
      <EMailDisplayName>jdoe@mycompany.org</EMailDisplayName>
      <Initials>J.D.</Initials>
      <Private>0</Private>
    </ROW>
  </dataroot>
</root>
__EOI__

sub get_text { map $_->textContent, @_ }

my $parser = XML::LibXML->new();
my $doc = $parser->parse_string($xml);
my $root = $doc->documentElement();

for my $row ($root->findnodes('/root/dataroot/ROW')) {
   my ($name)  = get_text( $row->findnodes('DisplayName') );
   my ($title) = get_text( $row->findnodes('JobTitle') );
   my ($email) = get_text( $row->findnodes('EMailDisplayName') );

   if (!defined($name) || !defined($title) || !defined($email)) {
      warn("Bad record\n");
      next;
   }

   my ($nick) = $email =~ /^([^@]*)/;

   print("$nick|$name||$email|$title\n");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Same as below... "Can't Locate" LibXML. Looking up how to include. –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 19:31
    
I ended up using David's, simply because it worked via the get() method vs the EOI block. I did use the single line nick statement. Thanks :) –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 20:26
    
@WernerCD, You are gravely mistaken, Mine works equally well with get($url) –  ikegami Jul 13 '11 at 21:44
    
I replaced the EOI block with "my $xml = get( $url );" and it crapped out on me. –  WernerCD Jul 13 '11 at 22:07
    
I'll concede that ikegami has given a more robust solution. As he pointed out, XML::Simple has a nasty habit of changing the shape of its datastructure as the XML hits edge cases (such as only one row, for example). And even while trying to come up with a more robust implementation still using XML::Simple I found the structure changes again if a second row is empty, versus populated. In other words, it's way too easy to find edge cases that cause XML::Simple to alter its output. Lesson learned for both of us, which is one of the great aspects of these forums. Thanks ikegami. –  DavidO Jul 14 '11 at 7:05

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