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I am having the issue of my below shown lines not storing the variable into the global scope:

var somedata;

$.ajax({
    cache: false,
    url: verification_url,
    success: function(data){
        somedata = data;
    }
});

alert(somedata); // Undefined

What am I doing wrong? Do I need to wrap this into a separate function or what?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The alert() code runs before the response from $.ajax is received.

That's why it's undefined.

var somedata;

$.ajax({
    cache: false,
    url: verification_url,
    success: function(data){
        somedata = data;

        alert( somedata );   // 2. this will occur after the response is received
    }
});

alert(somedata); // 1. this will occur first

Here you can see that the alerts happen out of order. By default an AJAX request does not prevent subsequent code from running.

That's the entire purpose of having a callback method. It is a method that gets called at the appropriate time, instead of relying on synchronous execution.

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So what would be an appropriate alternative design then? –  Industrial Jul 13 '11 at 18:53
1  
@industrial: Either use somedata in the callback, or make sure your design doesn't require information stored in somedata until after a successful ajax request. –  Brad Christie Jul 13 '11 at 18:55
    
add the alert to the success callback function. or define a function before making the request and have it called within the success function. either way what you want to have done needs to occur within the success function. (if you want it to run async) –  thescientist Jul 13 '11 at 18:55
3  
@Industrial: Any code that relies on the successful response needs to be located in your success: callback, or in a function that is invoked from the success: callback. –  user113716 Jul 13 '11 at 18:55

AJAX is asynchronous. That's what the A stands for in the acronym. You can access the results only in the success callback:

$.ajax({
    cache: false,
    url: verification_url,
    success: function(data){
        // HERE AND ONLY HERE YOU HAVE THE RESULTS
        // So it is here that you should manipulate them
        alert(data);
    }
});

// this line is executed MUCH BEFORE the success callback 
// and the server hasn't yet sent any response.

So any code that needs to manipulate the results must be place inside the success callback or in a function which is invoked from the success callback. You should not be relying on global state for this pattern.

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Not entirely true, it can only be access after the callback has been executed. (assuming somedata is assigned the returned result(s)) –  Brad Christie Jul 13 '11 at 18:52
1  
@Brad Christie, while this is true, it has no practical application as you don't know when the AJAX request completes. The only place you know is the success callback. Thus, as I said in my answer, that's the only place where you can know for sure that results are available. Any other place would be gambling. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '11 at 18:55
    
Gambling, true. However, it is possible to retrieve the value of somedata after a successful callback. Though it may be gambling, I was just trying to make mention that's it's not only accessible in the callback, just impractical. –  Brad Christie Jul 13 '11 at 18:58
1  
@Brad Christie, can you provide an example where you would access the results of an asynchronous AJAX callback other than the success callback itself or a function invoked directly from within the success callback? –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '11 at 19:04
1  
@Darin Dimitrov - narrow-minded and presumptive? Unless, of course, you DO know the requirements, limitations, design principles and developer preferences of every application ever written? What he wrote is factually correct :) –  tomfumb Jul 13 '11 at 19:13

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