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I'm working with a database that is only capable of supporting data types that I have written code for.

I created an Enum parameter with a list of available types.

public enum TableDataType
{
  None=0, String=1, Integer=2, Character=3, Boolean=4, DateTime=5, Decimal=6
}

This works, but I still have to process going in and coming back out of my data structures:

TableDataType GetMyType(DataGridViewColumn col) {
  TableDataType type;
  if (col.ValueType == typeof(bool)) {
    type = TableDataType.Boolean;
  } else if (col.ValueType == typeof(char)) {
    type = TableDataType.Character;
  } else if (col.ValueType == typeof(DateTime)) {
    type = TableDataType.DateTime;
  } else if (col.ValueType == typeof(Decimal)) {
    type = TableDataType.Decimal;
  } else if (col.ValueType == typeof(Int32)) {
    type = TableDataType.Integer;
  } else if (col.ValueType == typeof(string)) {
    type = TableDataType.String;
  } else {
    throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("Data Type of '{0}' is not supported.", col.ValueType));
  }
  return type;
}

Then there is code going the other way...

Type GetSystemType(TableDataType myType) {
  Type sysType;
  switch (myType) {
    case TableDataType.Boolean: sysType = typeof(bool); break;
    case TableDataType.Character: sysType = typeof(char); break;
    case TableDataType.DateTime: sysType = typeof(DateTime); break;
    case TableDataType.Integer: sysType = typeof(Int32); break;
    case TableDataType.Decimal: sysType = typeof(Decimal); break;
    case TableDataType.String: sysType = typeof(string); break;
    default: throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(string.Format("Data Type '{0}' is not allowed.", cd.DataType));
  }
  return sysType;
}

The problem comes from using routines similar to these at more than one spot in my code. If I tell a DataGridViewColumn that it is formatted for an Int32 then pass it an Integer, I get ArgumentException errors.

I'm looking for a good, fast class wrapper that cleverly stores the value and a select range of acceptable data types.

[EDIT] Solution I came up with:

Using the information provided in harpo's comment and Bas's solution, I created this class:

public static class Enumerate {

  private Enumerate() {
    throw new NotSupportedException();
  }

  public static SqlDbType ForSqlCe(System.Type item) {
    return sqlDbCode(item);
  }

  public static SqlDbType ForSqlCe(TableDataType item) {
    return sqlDbCode(item.GetType());
  }

  static SqlDbType sqlDbCode(System.Type item) {
    switch (Type.GetTypeCode(item)) {
      case TypeCode.Boolean: return SqlDbType.Bit;
      case TypeCode.Byte:
      case TypeCode.Char:
      case TypeCode.SByte: return SqlDbType.NChar;
      case TypeCode.DateTime: return SqlDbType.DateTime;
      case TypeCode.Decimal:
      case TypeCode.Double:
      case TypeCode.Single: return SqlDbType.Decimal;
      case TypeCode.Int16:
      case TypeCode.Int32:
      case TypeCode.Int64:
      case TypeCode.UInt16:
      case TypeCode.UInt32:
      case TypeCode.UInt64: return SqlDbType.Int;
      case TypeCode.String: return SqlDbType.NVarChar;
      case TypeCode.DBNull:
      case TypeCode.Empty:
      case TypeCode.Object:
      default: throw new TypeAccessException(item + " unknown");
    }
  }

  public static TableDataType ForTableData(SqlDbType item) {
    return tableDataCode(item.GetType());
  }

  public static TableDataType ForTableData(System.Type item) {
    return tableDataCode(item);
  }

  static TableDataType tableDataCode(System.Type item) {
    switch (Type.GetTypeCode(item)) {
      case TypeCode.Boolean: return TableDataType.Boolean;
      case TypeCode.Byte:
      case TypeCode.Char:
      case TypeCode.SByte: return TableDataType.Character;
      case TypeCode.DateTime: return TableDataType.DateTime;
      case TypeCode.Decimal:
      case TypeCode.Double:
      case TypeCode.Single: return TableDataType.Decimal;
      case TypeCode.Int16:
      case TypeCode.Int32:
      case TypeCode.Int64:
      case TypeCode.UInt16:
      case TypeCode.UInt32:
      case TypeCode.UInt64: return TableDataType.Integer;
      case TypeCode.String: return TableDataType.String;
      case TypeCode.DBNull:
      case TypeCode.Empty:
      case TypeCode.Object:
      default: throw new TypeAccessException(item + " unknown");
    }
  }

  public static Type ForWin32(string item) {
    string text = item.Trim().ToLower();
    switch (text) {
      case "boolean":
      case "bool":
      case "bit": return typeof(bool);
      case "byte":
      case "char":
      case "sbyte": return typeof(char);
      case "date":
      case "datetime":
      case "time": return typeof(DateTime);
      case "decimal":
      case "double":
      case "numeric":
      case "single": return typeof(Double);
      case "int":
      case "int16":
      case "int32":
      case "int64":
      case "integer":
      case "uint16":
      case "uint32":
      case "uint64": return typeof(Int32);
      case "string": return typeof(string);
      default:
        throw new TypeAccessException(item + " unknown");
    }
  }

  public static Type ForWin32(SqlDbType item) {
    return win32Code(item.GetType());
  }

  public static Type ForWin32(TableDataType item) {
    return win32Code(item.GetType());
  }

  static Type win32Code(System.Type item) {
    switch (Type.GetTypeCode(item)) {
      case TypeCode.Boolean: return typeof(bool);
      case TypeCode.Byte:
      case TypeCode.Char:
      case TypeCode.SByte: return typeof(char);
      case TypeCode.DateTime: return typeof(DateTime);
      case TypeCode.Decimal:
      case TypeCode.Double:
      case TypeCode.Single: return typeof(Decimal);
      case TypeCode.Int16:
      case TypeCode.Int32:
      case TypeCode.Int64:
      case TypeCode.UInt16:
      case TypeCode.UInt32:
      case TypeCode.UInt64: return typeof(Int32);
      case TypeCode.String: return typeof(string);
      case TypeCode.DBNull:
      case TypeCode.Empty:
      case TypeCode.Object:
      default: throw new TypeAccessException(item + " unknown");
    }
  }

}
share|improve this question
1  
You might want to check out System.TypeCode. I don't know if that (in conjunction with Type.GetTypeCode and Convert.ChangeType) will cover your requirements, but it would at least replace your custom enum with a builtin. –  harpo Jul 13 '11 at 19:52
    
Does the code used to access your db have methods of determining the data type? You can do this with the common .Net dataadapters and readers. –  Charlie Brown Jul 13 '11 at 19:53
1  
why not build a dictionary like Dictionary<TableDataType,Type> ? –  Caspar Kleijne Jul 13 '11 at 19:55
    
@Charlie Brown: My requirement is to import an Excel Comma Separated Value text file to a Data Table, and the text file does not have any type of schema stored with it. –  jp2code Jul 13 '11 at 20:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you dont want to use System.TypeCode like harpo suggests, use Type.GetType():

string assemblyQualifiedName = "System.{0}, mscorlib, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=b77a5c561934e089";

string typeString = myEnumValue.ToString();
Type type = Type.GetType(string.Format(assemblyQualifiedName, typeString));

Another option is to store the mapping in a Dictionary:

static class TypeResolver
{
    static Dictionary<TableDataType, Type> typeLookup = new Dictionary<TableDataType, Type>();

    static TypeResolver()
    {
        typeLookup.Add(TableDataType.Integer, typeof(Int32));
        typeLookup.Add(TableDataType.String, typeof(String));
    }

    public static Type Resolve(TableDataType tableType)
    {
        return typeLookup[tableType];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I'm guessing this would require a second Dictionary<Type, TableDataType> to convert back, too. Right? ...or maybe typeLookup.Where(t => t == T)? –  jp2code Jul 13 '11 at 20:32
    
+1 this is how i've done it. I wish there was a nice way to do this. –  DustinDavis Jul 13 '11 at 20:42
    
I would use a second dictionary to maintain the back reference. This retains the O(1) when using it. –  Bas Jul 13 '11 at 20:55
    
@Bas: Why? Does that add a performance benefit or something else? –  jp2code Jul 15 '11 at 13:36

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