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When Perl 5.8.1 came out it added hash randomization. When Perl 5.8.2 came out, I thought, it removed hash randomization unless an environment variable (PERL_HASH_SEED) was present. It now seems as if I am gravely mistaken as

PERL_HASH_SEED=$SEED perl -MData::Dumper -e 'print Dumper{map{$_,1}"a".."z"}'

Always kicks back the same key ordering regardless of the value of $SEED.

Did hash randomization go completely away, am I doing something wrong, or is this a bug?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

See Algorithmic Complexity Attacks:

In Perl 5.8.1 the hash function is randomly perturbed by a pseudorandom seed which makes generating such naughty hash keys harder. [...] but as of 5.8.2 it is only used on individual hashes if the internals detect the insertion of pathological data.

So randomization doesn't always happen, only when perl detects that it's needed.

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from perlrun as well: Most hashes by default return elements in the same order as in Perl 5.8.0. On a hash by hash basis, if pathological data is detected during a hash key insertion, then that hash will switch to an alternative random hash seed. –  Eric Strom Jul 13 '11 at 20:26
    
Drat, I had a nifty trick I wanted to use hash randomization for. –  Chas. Owens Jul 13 '11 at 20:26
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Reading perlrun, it seems to me it is saying if the env var is set it should be used for all non-pathological hashes, but that doesn't seem to be the behavior. –  ysth Jul 13 '11 at 20:38
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@Chas. Owens, It's NEVER reliably random, even when the seed takes effect. Use List::Util's shuffle –  ikegami Jul 13 '11 at 21:33
    
@ikegami Shuffle requires a full list to work, the trick was to randomize a hashes values without using more than two extra scalars. It would work on Perl 5.8.1, but only on Perl 5.8.1. –  Chas. Owens Jul 14 '11 at 0:59

At a minimum there have been some sloppy documentation updates. In the third paragraph of perlrun's entry for PERL_HASH_SEED it says:

The default behaviour is to randomise unless the PERL_HASH_SEED is set.

which which was true only in 5.8.1 and contradicts the paragraph immediately preceding it:

Most hashes by default return elements in the same order as in Perl 5.8.0. On a hash by hash basis, if pathological data is detected during a hash key insertion, then that hash will switch to an alternative random hash seed.

perlsec's entry for Algorithmic Complexity Attacks gets this right:

In Perl 5.8.1 the random perturbation was done by default, but as of 5.8.2 it is only used on individual hashes if the internals detect the insertion of pathological data.

perlsec goes on to say

If one wants for some reason emulate the old behaviour [...] set the environment variable PERL_HASH_SEED to zero to disable the protection (or any other integer to force a known perturbation, rather than random).

[emphasis added]

Since setting PERL_HASH_SEED does not effect the hash order, I'd call it a bug. Searching for "PERL_HASH_SEED" on rt.perl.org didn't return any results, so it doesn't appear to be a "known" issue.

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It doesn't contradicts the paragraph immediately preceding it, since the preceding paragraphs explains the randomising behaviour –  ikegami Jul 13 '11 at 21:36
    
The fact that PERL_HASH_SEED does not always affect hash order is not a bug since that's not what it's documented to do. You as quoted and emphasised, it's documented to affect the randomisation, and does exactly that. –  ikegami Jul 13 '11 at 21:40
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@ikegami It can certainly be made more clear. Reading just perlrun made me think setting PERL_HASH_SEED would cause it to randomize, not enable randomizing if a pathological case was detected. –  Chas. Owens Jul 14 '11 at 1:03
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@ikegami: Both paragraphs claim to describe default behavior. One says that the hash order is randomized, the other says "the same order as in Perl 5.8.0" which is not random. How is that not a contradiction? –  Michael Carman Jul 14 '11 at 14:30
    
@ikegami: While I can see how you interpret perlsec's description that way (the same thing occurred to me) it feels like a rationalization. If the seed is only used when a need for randomization is detected it should say so explicitly. Furthermore, it would seem more useful to be able to set the seed (always) than to set a known seed in the face of an algorithmic attack. I could have sworn it worked that way in 5.8.1 (i.e. set PERL_HASH_SEED to get the same order for different runs of a program) but I don't have that version installed and perldoc.perl.org doesn't go back that far. –  Michael Carman Jul 14 '11 at 14:51

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