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I am developing a web application which has a typical layered architecture:

a DAO layer that retrieves domain model objects from a database;

this layer communicates with the service layer which does some business operations using those objects;

the web layer (Spring Controllers) use the service layer to retrieve the domain model objects (or collections for them) and pass them to the view layer;

the view layer is either simple JSPs which show the data using JSTL, or JSPs which retrieve some of the data through AJAX in the form of JSON objects (domain objects converted to JSON through Jackson library).

I have been researching about the following:

Very often I need to convert the db fields to a different format to show to the user. For example, a Date might be store as a Timestamp and I want it to show it as a formatted date (e.g. dd/mm/yyyy).

Also, I need to do the opposite, convert some value (usually user input) to the format of a domain model object's property.

My question is, where should I be doing this kind of conversions? Especially with JSON data, they should be already formatted on the AJAX response, I dont think I should format it with Javascript, am I right?

Thank you in advance.

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Very often I need to convert the db fields to a different format to show to the user. For example, a Date might be store as a Timestamp and I want it to show it as a formatted date (e.g. dd/mm/yyyy).

Also, I need to do the opposite, convert some value (usually user input) to the format of a domain model object's property.

My question is, where should I be doing this kind of conversions?

My opinion is that all data format conversions ought to be done in the view, or in collaborative objects. The model or the service layer should not be performing this activity. It would be poor design to perform this in the model, for it would couple the interfaces exposed by the model to only one view. Also, it would make it more difficult to make changes in the view, requiring changes in your model as well.

You can refer to well-written JSF applications (since you mentioned that you are using Java EE), where specific converters are written to ensure that the view would format the contents of the domain objects appropriately.

Especially with JSON data, they should be already formatted on the AJAX response, I dont think I should format it with Javascript, am I right?

That would depend on how you view the view. If your representation of the view is that the server must provide the client with formatted data, then the server ought to do this. But, most applications take the practical approach where in client-side logic is also treated as part of the view. Depending on the context in which the data is used, you may:

  • either format the data on the server, especially if the formatted data is used universally at the client side without any further modifications.
  • or, transmit data to the client in a canonical form, which is then formatted on the context in which the data used and/or is displayed to the user.
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I have never used JSF and I have read many negative things about it so I would not like to go there at the moment. You mentioned "collaborative objects", what do you mean by that? Some kind of DTOs that contain the formatted data to show to the view? This might be a good practice, but it might be an overkill ,adding new classes for every domain model class that you need to show to the view. I mentioned as a bad idea the Javascript formatting because I know that maintaining it (or in my case jQuery) is a nightmare. But if I understand correctly you are not against it? – alex Jul 14 '11 at 6:39
    
If the view class itself doesn't format the data, but instead delegates it to a converter to do the same, then you are using a collaborator for formatting. A simpler example would be the c:out tag in JSTL, which performs XML encoding of the data before writing it to output. On the topic of sending encoded data from the model to the views, I would consider it a bad practice. What if you need to add a different client tomorrow - perhaps a thick client or a web-service? What would you do then? Creating separate DTOs or domain classes for each form of encoding is IMHO poor design. – Vineet Reynolds Jul 14 '11 at 6:57
    
I am sorry if I sound confused but I am not sure if I understand. In short, your opinion is that the formatting should be done on the client, either JSTL, or Javascript. Am I correct? Also, the c:out tag that you mention, how is it independent of the view? It is declared inside the view, isn't it? So, to conclude, in my case where most of the data comes from AJAX calls, all formatting of the data should be done in Javascript? – alex Jul 15 '11 at 6:21
    
@alex, JSTL runs on the server. The c:out tag is not independent of the view. It is independent of the model, and allows the model to not bother about encoding. As far as formatting of data is concerned, my opinion is that you should do it in the "view". It can be browser-side JavaScript, or server-side routines depending on what is suitable. That's what I meant by the phrase - Depending on the context in which the data is used. You may do the formatting in two different tiers, but for practical purposes, consider that there is only 1 view in your application. – Vineet Reynolds Jul 15 '11 at 7:32
    
Just to clarify one last thing, when there user input, the conversion to db fields should also be done in Javascript? So the data is converted first and then sent to the server? – alex Jul 22 '11 at 6:07

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