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It's there a way to configure the setInterval method of javascript to execute the method immediately and then executes with the timer

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Not natively though. You can try calling the function once and then doing the setInterval() –  Mrchief Jul 13 '11 at 20:46
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7 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

It's simplest to just call the function yourself directly the first time:

foo();
setInterval(foo, delay);

However there are good reasons to avoid setInterval - in particular in some circumstances a whole load of setInterval events can arrive immediately after each other without any delay. Another reason is that if you want to stop the loop you have to explicitly call clearInterval which means you have to remember the handle returned from the original setInterval call.

So an alternative method is to have foo trigger itself for subsequent calls using setTimeout instead:

function foo() {
   // do stuff
   // ...

   // and schedule a repeat
   setTimeout(foo, delay);
}

// start the cycle
foo();

This guarantees that there is at least an interval of delay between calls. It also makes it easier to cancel the loop if required - you just don't call setTimeout when your loop termination condition is reached.

Better yet, you can wrap that all up in an immediately invoked function expression which creates the function, which then calls itself again as above, and automatically starts the loop:

(function foo() {
    ...
    setTimeout(foo, delay);
})();

which defines the function and starts the cycle all in one go.

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3  
Why do you prefer setTimeout? –  Sangdol May 29 '12 at 10:03
4  
@Sangdol because it ensures that timer events don't "stack" if they're left unprocessed. In some circumstances a whole load of setInterval events can arrive immediately after each other without any delay. –  Alnitak May 29 '12 at 10:05
    
I like the last block of code you posted. And good point with setTimeout(); you guarantee the previous cycle is complete before the second one is even scheduled. –  styfle Aug 16 '12 at 21:51
7  
@JamesAndino because it's using setTimeout and not setInterval ... –  Alnitak Aug 29 '12 at 17:43
2  
There should be some kind of test that does not let you post on stack when you are tired –  James Andino Sep 5 '12 at 2:38
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I'm not sure if I'm understanding you correctly, but you could easily do something like this:

setInterval(function hello() {
  console.log('world');
  return hello;
}(), 5000);

There's obviously any number of ways of doing this, but that's the most concise way I can think of.

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This is a cool answer because it's a named function that executes immediately and also returns itself. Exactly what I was looking for. –  jmort253 Feb 17 at 22:40
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Here's a wrapper to pretty-fy it if you need it:

(function() {
    var originalSetInterval = window.setInterval;

    window.setInterval = function(fn, delay, runImmediately) {
        if(runImmediately) fn();
        originalSetInterval(fn, delay);
    };
})();

Set the third argument of setInterval to true and it'll run for the first time immediately after calling setInterval:

setInterval(function() { console.log("hello world"); }, 5000, true);

Or omit the third argument and it will retain its original behaviour:

setInterval(function() { console.log("hello world"); }, 5000);

Some browsers support additional arguments for setInterval which this wrapper doesn't take into account; I think these are rarely used, but keep that in mind if you do need them.

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The var runImmediately = runImmediately || false; line is unnecessary—runImmediately will be falsy if no third parameter is passed. –  jli Oct 28 '13 at 5:21
    
@jli right, updated. –  Mahn Oct 28 '13 at 10:47
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You could wrap setInterval() in a function that provides that behavior:

function instantGratification( fn, delay ) {
    fn();
    setInterval( fn, delay );
}

...then use it like this:

instantGratification( function() {
    console.log( 'invoked' );
}, 3000);
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If you extract the code you are passing to setInterval into a function, you can call the function directly immediately after calling setInterval. This achieves the same effect.

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There's a problem with immediate asynchronous call of your function, because standard setTimeout/setInterval has a minimal timeout about several milliseconds even if you directly set it to 0. It caused by a browser specific work.

An example of code with a REAL zero delay wich works in Chrome, Safari, Opera

function setZeroTimeout(callback) {
var channel = new MessageChannel();
channel.port1.onmessage = callback;
channel.port2.postMessage('');
}

You can find more information here

And after the first manual call you can create an interval with your function.

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actually the quickest is to do

interval = setInterval(myFunction(),45000)

this will call myfunction, and then will do it agaian every 45 seconds which is different than doing

interval = setInterval(myfunction, 45000)

which won't call it, but schedule it only

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